Program Information

Congress Schedule

  National
Convention Hall
CONFERENCE CENTER
503
8:00
9:00
10:00
11:00
12:00
13:00

Clinical Practice and Support Staff (1):Myofunctional Therapy

13:30-15:30

Clinical Practice and Support Staff (1):Myofunctional Therapy

Ryuzo Kanomi

Important clinical role of MFT in Orthodontics
-The effective training methods (with daily effort) of MFT-

Ryuzo Kanomi

Professional Experience and Education

2008- Adjunct Lecturer, Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics of Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, Japan
2008-2013 Adjunct Clinical Professor, Department of Orthodontics at Osaka University, Japan
2002 PhD, Orthodontics, Osaka University, Japan
1989 DDSc, Pedodontics, Osaka Dental University, Japan
1980- Director, Kanomi Dental Office, Japan
1977 DDS, Osaka Dental University, Japan

Honors and Awards

Joseph E. Johnson Table Clinic Awards by A.A.O. (1994, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2001)

Research Interests

Early Treatment Orthodontics, Orthodontic Anchor Screw

Abstract

In recent years, numerous cases have emerged in the pediatric clinical setting in which a decrease in oral function has been observed in children with malocclusion. Is the decreased oral function causing the malocclusion? There is definitely a chicken-and-egg relationship between the two, but what goes without saying is that for children in the growing years, development of the oral cavity is closely involved in this issue.

Given this background, we will be looking closely at the normal developmental process of oral cavity function, and at a number of problems that can result from the decrease in this function. In addition, we will offer specific suggestions for methods of guidance, and items to be checked and observed.
1. MFT in patients who breathe through their mouth
2. MFT in patients with ankyloglossia
3. MFT in patients with oral habits
4. MFT in patients with a narrow maxillary dental arch
5. MFT in patients with an anterior open bite

Clinical Practice and Support Staff (1):Myofunctional Therapy

Osamu Takahashi

Effective combination of orthodontics and myofunctional therapy

Osamu Takahashi

Professional Experience and Education

2000-2020 Director, Takahashi Orthodontic Clinic, Japan
1991-2000 Faculty Member, Department of Orthodontics, Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo, Japan
1990 DDSc, Nihon University Graduate School of Dentistry at Matsudo, Japan
1986 DDS, Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo, Japan

Honors and Awards

2008 Certified Orthodontist of the Japanese Board of Orthodontics
1996 Certified Orofacial Myologist of the International Association of Orofacial Myology

Research Interests

Integrating Orthodontics and Orofacial Myology

Abstract

Myofunctional therapy (MFT) is a training to improve function of perioral muscles. Teeth are receiving pressure from perioral muscles such as lips and tongue constantly, various dental problems arise from imbalance of the pressure. MFT aims to make a desirable environment for maintaining normal morphology of dentition by improving the function of perioral muscles.
MFT can help to develop normal patterns of tooth eruption and alignment. In the patient undergoing orthodontics, MFT can contribute good progress of the treatment and to stabilize the result by creating favorable environment.
The contents of MFT are comprised; 1) training of individual muscles, 2) correcting abnormal pattern of chewing and swallowing, 3) habituation of normal resting posture of tongue, lips and jaw.
Training of individual muscles includes not only strengthening of weak muscles, but also relaxing of excessively tense muscles, and aims to produce overall harmony.
Correction of chewing and swallowing patterns aims to eliminate the inappropriate muscle function during eating. The purpose of the training of eating in MFT is different from that in dysphagia. Dysphagia patients have difficulties to eat from their mouth and the main aim of the treatment is to prevent malnutrition and aspiration. In contrast, patients of MFT usually can eat from mouth without aspiration, but the unfavorable pressure from muscles during mastication affects the dentition.
Habituation of normal resting posture is the most important object of MFT, because light sustained pressures from muscles effects tooth position.
I will present some orthodontic cases treated in combination with MFT.

Clinical Practice and Support Staff (1):Myofunctional Therapy

Takashi Nezu

Awareness Training and Myofunctional Therapy in Orthodontics

Takashi Nezu

Professional Experience and Education

2013-2020 The deputy director and Clinical chief, Nezu Orthodontic Clinic, Japan
2010-2013 An associate doctor, Nezu Orthodontic Clinic, Japan
2009 Completion of Graduate School of Dentistry at TDC to obtain PhD
2009 Completion of postgraduate course at Orthodontic Department, Tokyo Dental College, Japan
2005 DDS, Tokyo Dental College, Japan

Research Interests

Diagnosis and Treatment of Dysfunction in Orthodontics
Treatment planning in Orthodontics
Treatment of High Degree of Difficulty Cases

Abstract

Malocclusion is not merely caused by morphological anomalies and/or improper eruption of teeth, but it is closely related to dysfunctional problems. In addition, diagnosis and training of dysfunctions such as various oral habits etc. are extremely important in executing orthodontic treatment properly. Particularly, in the high degree of difficulty cases, both morphological correction with mechanics and functional training of the patients is quite necessary.

Unlocking of malocclusion includes mechanical unlocking, which is morphological correction with mechanics, and functional unlocking, which is neutralizing various dysfunction to release from restricted environment (locking), and to restore the health of the orofacial structure including the TMJ. During growth, it refers to induce normal growth and development.

To improve dysfunctional problems and to reduce their influence on development of malocclusion, functional unlocking consists of Awareness Training (AT) to every patient including Myofunctional Therapy (MFT).
AT is to point out the effects of dysfunctions that patients are sometimes not aware of daily, and to understand the causal relationship with malocclusion, and to finally change their behavior. Patients without any exceptions need breathing/swallowing, muscles, posture and habit training. We identify the relevance and conduct individual training procedures to each case.

In our practice, we share the information and the need for training with patients through precise clinical examination, ordinary diagnostic materials and other data from implemented technologies, such as rhinomanometry and electromyograms. In this presentation, I am going to illustrate the why and the how of our functional training.

14:00
15:00
16:00

WFO Keynote Lecture

Takayuki Kuroda

Evidence-based Orthodontic Treatment: What Is the Evidence?

Takayuki Kuroda

Professional education

  • Faculty of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University. D.D.S., 1961
  • Graduate School, Faculty of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, PhD. 1965

Academic Appointment

  • Associate Professor, Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1974~1981
  • Professor & Chairman, Second Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental university, 1981~1999
  • Professor & Chairman, Maxillofacial Orthognathics, Department of Maxillofacial Reconstruction and Function, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1999~2002
  • Professor Emeritus, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2002~Present
  • Research Associate, Department of Orthodontics, The Royal Dental College Copenhagen, 1966~1967
  • Research Associate, The Center for Human Growth and Development, University of Michigan, 1969~1970

Academic Activity

Japanese Orthodontic Society Honorary Member (Past Board Member)
Japanese Association of Cleft Lip and Palate Honorary Member (Past President)
Japanese Association for Jaw Deformity Honorary Member (Past President)
Japanese Association for Dental Research (JADR) Life Member (Past President)
International Association for Dental Research (IADR) Life Member (Past President)
World Federation of Orthodontists (WFO) Honorary Fellow
Charles H. Tweed International Foundation for Orthodontic Research     Honorary Academic Fellowship

Award

  • President Award of Japanese Association for Dental Science    2000
  • Louis Ada Jarabak Memorial International Teacher and Research Award, American Association of Orthodontists    2010
  • The order of the Sacred Treasure, Gold Rays with Neck Ribbon, Japanese Emperor    2016

Abstract

Irregularities of the teeth and unacceptable facial appearance have been human concerns since the Greek and Roman periods. The word “orthodontics” was first used in a book published in the late 18th century by Pierre Fauchard. Norman Kingsley published a book entitled “Treatise of oral deformities as a branch of mechanical surgery” in 1880 in which he introduced the mechanics of tooth movement and its biological tissue reaction. More recently, Edward Angle had a great influence on modern orthodontics. While orthodontic clinical treatment has been built on these and other forefathers, patient care in 2020 and beyond demands more than historical precedent.

Currently the terms “evidence-based orthodontics” and “evidence-based treatment” are often used in orthodontic clinical and research publications to validate a particular therapeutic approach. What is the actual “evidence” for what we do as orthodontists and where does it come from? Development of knowledge in the areas of molecular biology, craniofacial growth and development, histological tissue reaction, dental materials, as well as the improved use of statistics have supported the current theoretical basis for orthodontic treatment. As a result, there has been increased development of technical procedures for patient care.

Looking to the future, we need to focus on individual patient variables by better monitoring differences in the biological and psycho-social backgrounds among patients. Future clinicians considering orthodontic treatment planning will need to cultivate an “individualized diagnostic eye,” based on improved understanding of more broadly based and identified patient characteristics.

17:00
18:00