Program Information

Congress Schedule

  National
Convention Hall
CONFERENCE CENTER
Main Hall 301+302 303+304 501+502 503
8:00

Biomechanics

8:00-9:10

Biomechanics

Ravindra Nanda

Relevancy of Biomechanics in Clinical Orthodontics in 2020

Ravindra Nanda

Professional Experience and Education

1964 BDS, KGMC, Lucknow, India
1966 MDS, KGMC, Lucknow, India
1969 PhD, Nymegen, The Netherlands
1970 Assistant Professor, Loyola, Chicago
1972 Assistant Professor, University of Connecticut, Farmington
1992-2017 Head Department of Orthodontics, Univ. of Connecticut

Honors and Awards

2009 John Valentine Mershon Memorial Lecture, AAO, Boston
2010 Life time achievement Award, Univ. of Connecticu
2011 Sheldon Friel Memorial Lecture, EOS, Istanbul
2017 Orthodontic Legend award, CDABO, Orlando

Research Interests

Biomechanics and orthodontic appliances
Clinical trials
Acceleration of tooth movement

Abstract

Practice of clinical Orthodontics has significantly changed over the last three decades. Our customary work with wires and brackets since last century now includes use of skeletal anchorage devices, orthographic surgery without pre surgical orthodontics and use of sequential plastic aligners to correct malocclusions. However we are still seeking answers to how can we accelerate orthodontic tooth movement to finish treatment sooner. Numerous commercial devices have been promoted, some with spurious claims and others with less than desirable results.
For all the existing treatment modalities and newer methods such as aligners and mini screws, there is one common denominator and that is biomechanics. Without a clear understanding of forces and moments delivered by wires or aligners via brackets or mini screws, achieving predictable results would be impossible. With the popularity of aligners and other non traditional treatment methods it even becomes more important to understand how forces work and how to prevent side effects.

Biomechanics

Noriaki Yoshida

Smart and Visible Biomechanics - Optimizing treatment mechanics based on prediction strategy for long-term tooth movement

Noriaki Yoshida

Professional Experience and Education

1980-1986 DDS from Nagasaki University School of Dentistry, Japan
1990-2000 Assistant Professor, Department of Orthodontics, Nagasaki University School of Dentistry
1992-1994 Research fellow, Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Free University Berlin, Germany
1994 Research fellow, Humboldt University, Germany
2000-2001 Senior Assistant Professor, Department of Orthodontics, Nagasaki University School of Dentistry
2005 Visiting Professor, Orthodontics, Division of Craniofacial Sciences and Therapeutics, University of Southern California, USA
2001-present Professor and Chair, Department of Orthodontics, Nagasaki University School of Dentistry

Honors and Awards

1999 Encouragement Award, Japanese Society of Stomatognathic Function

Research Interests

Biomechanics
Clinical application of temporary anchorage devices
Development of stomatognathic function

Abstract

This presentation will deal with biomechanical solutions for maximizing therapeutic efficiency and minimizing side effects during orthodontic treatment. Although various treatment techniques have been developed, it remains quite difficult to predict or compare actual tooth movements subsequent to the application of different treatment mechanics. Therefore, the prediction and planning of orthodontic tooth movement have been largely dependent on clinical experiences. With such a background, the demand for simulating long-term tooth movement under the various treatment mechanics has been increasing to improve therapeutic efficiency and reduce the treatment time.
We developed a simulation system of long-term orthodontic tooth movement based on a bone remodeling algorithm using the finite element method. Using this system, the optimal loading condition for achieving speedy and controllable tooth movements can be determined.
The optimal loading condition on the application of sliding mechanics in combination with power arms during space closure in an extraction case will be described. Also for loop mechanics, a simple and innovative design of closing loop, which produces an optimal force magnitude and M/F ratio for en-masse retraction, and is applicable in the 0.022-in slot system, will be introduced.
Clinical application of temporary anchorage devices combined with the above mentioned mechanics will be also discussed.

TMJ

Kotaro Tanimoto

The Mechanism of Degenerative Changes in Temporomandibular Joint and Possible Approach for Orthodontic Treatment

Kotaro Tanimoto

Professional Experience and Education

2016 - 2019 Vice dean, Hiroshima University School of Dentistry, Japan
2016 - 2019 Section chief , Hiroshima University Hospital, Division of Speech therapy, Japan
2016 - 2019 Section chief, Hiroshima University Hospital, Cleft and Craniofacial Center, Japan
2013 - 2019 Professor, Department of Orthodontics and Craniofacial Developmental Biology, Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Japan
2009 - 2012 Lecturer, Hiroshima University Dental Hospital Department of Oral Health Development Orthodontics, Japan
1999 - 2008 Assistant Professor, Department of Orthodontics and Craniofacial Developmental Biology, Hiroshima University Graduate school of Biomedical Sciences, Japan
2001 Ph.D, Hiroshima University Post Graduate Education of Dental Sciences
1995 - 1999 Resident, Department of Orthodontics, Hiroshima University Dental Hospital, Japan
1992 - 1995 Associate dentist, Akabane Dental Clinic, Tokyo, JAPAN
1992 DDS, Faculty of Dentistry, Hiroshima University

Honors and Awards

2019 Best Poster Presentation Award, Japanese Society for the Temporomandibular Joint
2019 Excellent Posterboard Presentation Award, Korean Association of Orthodontics

Research Interests

Temporomandibular disorders

Abstract

Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are frequently accompanied with malocclusion in orthodontic patients. Severe mandibular condylar resorption causes retrusion and deviation of the mandible, leading to the onset and progress of malocclusions such as skeletal open bite. In our department, if TMDs are diagnosed during the initial clinical examination of malocclusion patients, Temporomandibular joint (TMJ)-MRI is taken as a general rule. In cases where mandibular condylar deformity is suspected, orthodontic treatment will not start unless the condylar resorption abates.
The pathogenic mechanism of TMDs has been studied to establish safe and reliable orthodontic treatment procedure for patients with malocclusion accompanied by TMD. Although the detailed mechanism of TMDs pathology still remains unclear, inflammation in the synovial membrane and condylar cartilage has been believed to play a crucial role in the incidence of severe TMDs such as osteoarthritis (OA). TMJ-OA is characterized by degenerative joint changes such as deterioration and abrasion of the articular cartilage, and occurrence of thickening and remodeling of the underlying bone. Several cytokines were detected in the synovial fluid in patients with TMJ-OA, and induce matrix metalloproteinases:MMPs. These enzymes cause breakdown of condylar cartilage, resulting in further deterioration of the lubricating and buffering function of TMJ. Recently, details of the mechanism by which an inflammatory response is induced through mechanoreceptors that receive an excessive mechanical load has been clarified.
In this presentation, the molecular mechanism of condylar resorption will be considered based on the basic research and clinical data for the past 28 years.

TMJ

Sunil Kapila

Idiopathic Condylar Resorption: Current Approaches to Diagnosis and Management

Sunil Kapila

Professional Experience and Education

1977-1981 University of Nairobi, Kenya, Bachelor of Dental Surgery
1984-1987 University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, MS & Certificate of Specialization in Orthodontics
1987-1994 University of California San Francisco, Ph.D. in Oral Biology
1993-1999 Assistant Professor, Department of Growth and Development, UCSF
1999-2004 Associate Professor, Department of Growth and Development, UCSF
2000-2004 Eugene E. West Endowed Chair, Division of Orthodontics of Orthodontics, UCSF
2004-2016 Robert W. Browne Endowed Professor of Orthodontics and Chair, Department of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry, University of Michigan
2016-Present Professor and Eugene. E. West Endowed Chair of Orthodontics, UCSF
2017-2019 CEO and Chief Dental Officer, UCSF Dental Center, UCSF School of Dentistry

Honors and Awards

1984-1987 Fulbright Hayes Scholarship
1987-1992 Dean's Fellowship, School of Dentistry, UCSF
1989-1990 Regents Fellowship, UCSF
1993 Hatton Award Winner, American Association for Dental Research
1995 Milo Hellman Research Award, AAO
1999 B.F. Dewel Honorary Research Award, AAO Foundation
2007 Outstanding Alumnus Award, Department of Orthodontics University of Oklahoma College of Dentistry
2012 16th Annual Robert E. Moyers Memorial Lecture, Ann Arbor, MI.
2013 Salzmann Lecture, Annual Session of the AAO, Philadelphia, Penn
2013 Fellow of the International College of Dentists
2015 150th Anniversary Alumni Excellence Award Recipient, UCSF
2018-2019 Burstone Fellow in Biomechanics, AAO Foundation

Research Interests

Hormonal Pathobiology of TMJ Degeneration
Biomodulation of Tooth Movement and Root Resorption in Orthodontic Therapy
Cone Beam Computed Tomography and 3D Imaging

Abstract

The pre-treatment or in-treatment identification of patients undergoing idiopathic condylar resorption of the TMJ and their management remains one of the biggest challenges in orthodontics. Frequently, because these joint resorptive events and associated adverse dental and skeletal alterations occur during orthodontic treatment, the concomitant compromised function and facial changes are often attributed to the orthodontic therapy itself. Much is still unknown about these perplexing conditions. In his presentation, Dr. Kapila will discuss the current understanding of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of idiopathic condylar resorption, including that which may occur during juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Early recognition through careful history taking and clinical examination together with newer diagnostic methods using 3D imaging and biomarkers and constant monitoring can help mitigate some of the challenges arising during orthodontic treatment. Alternatively, these findings can be used to defer treatment of these patients until stabilization occurs. Specific radiographic and other features that indicate cessation of the disease process are a prerequisite for initiating orthodontic therapy. Dr. Kapila will also discuss a range for patient-specific treatment options for individuals presenting with different phenotypic and degenerative TMJ findings in idiopathic condylar resorption ranging from conservative management to orthognathic surgery.

Craniofacial Disorders

8:00-9:10

Craniofacial Disorders

Nik Kantaputra

What face, teeth, and gum can tell you about syndromes

Nik Kantaputra

Brief biography of Nik Kantaputra

Dr. Piranit Nik Kantaputra, a professor in medical genetics, is the director of Center of Excellence in Medical Genetics Research, Chiang Mai University and a faculty of the Division of Pediatric Dentistry, Department of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand. He graduated with Doctor of Dental Surgery from Chiang Mai University in 1986 and obtained Certificate and Master of Science in Pediatric Dentistry from the University of Minnesota, USA in 1990. He had a fellowship training in Clinical Dysmorphology with Prof. Robert J. Gorlin at the University of Minnesota during 1990-1991. His major research interest is finding the causes of rare craniofacial malformation syndromes, especially when teeth are involved. Recently his research team has identified the genes responsible for the smallest teeth and the biggest teeth in the world. Prof. Kantaputra has identified more than 13 new genetic syndromes, published more than 77 international publications, and 3 book chapters. Dr. Kantaputra is an editorial board members of American Journal of Medical Genetics and Journal of Human Genetics.

Abstract

A number of dental patients have genetic disorders which may have systemic involvements such as congenital heart diseases and brain disorders. The ability to recognize if your patients have genetic syndromes is beneficial for your clinical practice and the understanding of human development. Patients with Microcephalic Osteodysplastic Primordial Dwarfism type II have been reported to have the smallest teeth in the world and some of them have been reported to have strokes at very young ages. The syndromes of the biggest teeth in the world and the longest roots will be presented. Patients with Amelogenesis Imperfecta, hypoplastic type may have nephrocalcinosis or kidney stones if they have mutations in FAM20A. This syndrome is known as "Enamel-Renal-Gingival Syndrome". The lecture will cover common genetic syndromes and how to recognize them. The syndromes that will be included are Holoprosencephaly, X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia, Ellis-van Creveld syndrome, and Van der Woude syndrome etc. This lecture will demonstrate how teeth can be used in syndrome diagnosis and how rare craniofacial and tooth syndromes help us to understand human biology.

Evidence Based Orthodontics

8:00-9:10

Evidence Based Orthodontics

Carlos Flores Mir

Application of evidence into daily orthodontic clinical decisions - the unerupted teeth story

Carlos Flores Mir

H-Index

53 Google Scholar - 32 Scopus - 31 Web of Science

Education

DDS (Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia ? Peru - 1994)
Certificate in Orthodontics (UPCH ? Peru - 1998)
BSc in Stomatology (UPCH ? Peru - 1994)
MSc in Stomatology (UPCH ? Peru - 1999)
DSc in Stomatology (UPCH ? Peru - 2002)
Postdoctoral Fellowship (University of Alberta- Canada - 2005)

Employment

Tenured Professor at the University of Alberta Extramural Private Practice in Edmonton, Canada

Current Position

Orthodontic Program Director, University of Alberta (since 04/10)
Head of the Division of Orthodontics, University of Alberta (04/10 to 06/17)
Assistant Editor, The Angle Orthodontist (Since 04/12)
Assistant Editor, Dental Press Journal of Orthodontics (Since 01/15)
Assistant Editor, Journal of World Federation of Orthodontics (Since 04/17)

Presentations

More than 120 international presentations around the topics of Clinical Orthodontics, Evidence-based Dentistry and Evidence-based Orthodontics (Argentina, Australia, Bolivia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Chile, Costa Rica, Germany, Iceland, Israel, Italy, Mexico, Netherlands, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Romania, Uruguay, USA, Scotland, Switzerland and Spain)

Major Teaching awards

2014 Department of Dentistry, Gibb Teaching Scholar Award, 2010 Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta ? Tier II Clinical Award for Excellence in Mentoring Student, 2007 Association of Canadian Faculties of Dentistry (ACFD) - W. W. Wood Award for Excellence in Dental Education

Publications

6 book chapters related to Evidence-based Dentistry 280 peer-reviewed articles and 37 commentaries published.

Abstract

This presentation will explore how recently published evidence (systematic reviews and randomized clinical trials) focused on impacted teeth has impacted my day to day clinical decisions when faced with a potential impacted canine. The following questions will be explored:
Does CBCT make always a difference? - diagnosis focus
Is there a better outcome if a specific surgical exposure approach is used? - management focus
Is it always worth to attempt to tract the impacted tooth down? - prognosis focus
Can early extraction of deciduous canines reduce the chances of permanent canine impaction? - prognosis focus
Clinical cases will be shown to facilitate the conversation.

Evidence Based Orthodontics

Padhraig Fleming

Orthodontic Retention: Not letting go?

Padhraig Fleming

Professional Experience

2018- Present Professor of Orthodontics, Queen Mary University of London Consultant
2017- Present Postgraduate Training Lead in Orthodontics, Queen Mary University of London.

Honours and Awards

2007 MSc with Distinction
2008 Membership in Orthodontics and British Orthodontic Society Medal
2011 Chapman Prize, British Orthodontic Society
2013 PhD
2013 BF and Helen E Dewel Award, American Association of Orthodontists.

Research Interests

Treatment effectiveness and Predictability
Clinical Trials

Abstract

While there is increasing acceptance of the necessity for indefinite retention, there has been relatively little prospective research concerning the relative effectiveness of fixed and removable retention protocols in the longer term.

Prolonged outcomes with fixed and removable regimes will be discussed on the basis of a recent randomized controlled trial with 4-year follow-up. Patient experiences associated with retention, including factors influencing compliance with removable retention will also be presented.

The effectiveness of novel electronic methods in enhancing adherence will be discussed on the basis of a further clinical trial. Finally, practical approaches to improving outcomes with both fixed and removable designs will be illustrated.

APOS oration

8:00-9:20

Eric JW Liou

Redirecting mandibular and maxillary growth in pubertal growing patients with Class III malocclusion

Eric JW Liou

Dr. Eric Liou is an associate professor and the immediate past chairman of the Faculty of Dentistry, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital & Chang Gung University, Taipei, Taiwan. He is also a visiting professor in the Department of Orthodontics, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan. For the profession affiliations, Dr. Liou was the president of the Taiwan association of Orthodontists 2015-2016, and is the immediate past president of the World Implant Orthodontic Association (WIOA). Currently, he is the Vice President of the Asian Pacific Orthodontic Society (APOS) and an editor of the APOS Trends in Orthodontics, and Secretary General of the WIOA. His main research interests are distraction osteogenesis, TADs, orthodontic tooth movement, platelet rich plasma (PRP) and bone physiology, and surgical and non-surgical innovative approaches. Dr. Liou has numerous presentations especially on the topics of Class III orthognathic camouflage treatment, treatment of occlusal cant and facial asymmetry with yin-yang arch wires, accelerated orthodontic tooth movement with PRP, maxillary orthopedic protraction, surgery first orthognathic approach, and TADs.

Abstract

Mandibular prognathism and/or maxillary hypoplasia are the two most common features in pubertal patients with Class III malocclusion. Maxillary hypoplasia includes sagittal and/or vertical deficiency. The orthodontic camouflage treatment or orthopedic maxillary protraction in growing Class III patients usually focuses on the sagittal improvement of anterior cross bite and maxillary growth, but seldom on the maxillary vertical deficiency and control of mandibular growth. Furthermore, the subsequent relapse & cease of maxillary sutural growth after maxillary protraction, and outgrowth of mandible during puberty are substantially unsolved problems. Although we are not able to reduce the growth amount of mandible, the purpose of this presentation is to propose innovative thoughts and clinically feasible techniques for redirecting mandibular growth inferiorly and even posteriorly, and at the same time redirecting maxillary growth anteriorly and inferiorly by surface remodeling of maxilla (periosteal growth of maxilla). The rationales, clinical studies, and cases illustrations will be presented.

Clinical Practice and Support Staff (2): New Digital Technology in orthodontic clinic

8:00-09:20

Clinical Practice and Support Staff (2): New Digital Technology in orthodontic clinic

David R Musich

New Technology Enhancing Patient Care: What is Your Role?

David R Musich

CV

1990-2020 Clinical Professor of Orthodontics, U of Pennsylvania Department of Orthodontics
1981-1990 Associate Professor of Orthodontics, U of Pennsylvania Department of Orthodontics
1979-1981 Acting Chairman, Division of Orthodontics, University of Chicago Orthodontic Residency
1974-1975 Acting Chairman, Department of Orthodontics, U of Pennsylvania SDM
1973-1975 Orthodontic Consultant Craniofacial & Cleft Palate Division, Children's Hospital of University of Pennsylvania
1971-1981 Assistant Professor of Orthodontics, U of Pennsylvania Department of Orthodontics
1969-1971 MS Degree, University of Nebraska School of Dentistry
1965-1969 DDS Degree, Loyola University School of Dentistry

Honors and Awards

2006 Award of Merit, College of Diplomates, American Board of Orthodontics
2006 Special Recognition Award, United Parents Supporting Down Syndrome
2008 Angle East's Harvey Peck Award of Excellence
2009 AAO's James Brophy Distinguished Service Award
2020 AAO's Annual Session Mershon Lecture

Key Publications and Research Interests

Musich, DR: Orthodontic Treatment In Patients Requiring Orthognathic Surgical Procedures. In Integrated Clinical Orthodontics, First Edition.Edited by Vinod Krishman and Ze'ev Davidovitch. Blackwell Publishing Ltd. 2012.

2 Chapters in last 6th editions of Orthodontics: Current Principles and Techniques. (titles below)
Vanarsdall, Robert L. and Musich, David R.: Adult Interdisciplinary Therapy: Diagnosis and Treatment. In Graber, Lee, Vanarsdall, Robert, Vig, K. & Huang, G: (Eds.), Orthodontics: Current Principles and Techniques, 6th ed., Chapter 21, Elsevier Publishing Co. St. Louis, 2016.
Musich, David R.and Chemello, Peter: Orthodontic Aspects of Orthognathic Surgery. In Graber, Lee, Vanarsdall, Robert, Vig, K. & Huang, G: (Eds.), Orthodontics: Current Principles and Techniques, 6th ed., Chapter 23, Elsevier Publishing Co. St. Louis, 2016

Ngan P, Musich D: Stability and Relapse of Class III Treatment. In Stability and Relapse. In Christos Katsaros & Theodore Eliades. Quintessence Publishing. Berlin. 2018.

Abstract

Abstract
In the past 10-15 years all fields of patient care in both medicine and dentistry have been affected by significant technological advances. New technology has influenced the delivery of orthodontic treatment in 3 key areas of patient care:
1. Enhanced diagnostic tools such as 3-D radiographs, airway assessment, digital scanners and the use of biomarkers for preventive services.
2. Sophisticated treatment tools: TADS for enhanced anchorage; algorithm generated removable aligners, digitally generated lingual appliances, precise, robotically generated arch wires, minimally invasive anterior implants and surgically facilitated orthodontic treatment (SFOT).
3. Retention protocols that require enhanced communication tools.

Allied staff are required to understand the details of these technological advances, how these advances will enhance patient treatment outcomes, and be able to educate their patients how these advances, when applied, will improve the quality of their orthodontic outcome. Allied staff become a "trusted advisor" when patients are hesitant to proceed with advanced therapies; they are the ones that answer key questions when the doctor has left the room and they are the ones that help the patient make the commitment to the desired treatment plan.

Clinical Practice and Support Staff (2): New Digital Technology in orthodontic clinic

Tatsuya Kosaka

What changes are caused by digital technology in the orthodontic field?

Tatsuya Kosaka

Professional Experience and Education

2018- Director, Kosaka Orthodontic Office
2014- Part-time Faculty, Department of Orthodontics, Tokyo dental college
2013-2018 Deputy Director, Kosaka Orthodontic Office
2007-2013 Assistant Professor, Division of Orthodontics, Department of Clinical Oral Health Science, Tokyo Dental College-Suidobashi Hospital
2006-2007 Hospital Resident, Department of Orthodontics, Tokyo Dental college-Chiba Hospital
2006.03 PhD, Tokyo Dental college, Doctor's Course, Completed
2001-2003 Postgraduate training course at the Department of Orthodontics, Tokyo Dental College
2001.03 DDS, Tokyo Dental College Graduated

Research Interests

3D analysis of masticatory movement, Straight-Wire technique

Abstract

Social life has undergone large-scale transformations with the development of digital technology in recent years. These changes are accelerating day by day, with developments in both hardware and software taking place. One advantage of digitalization is the systematic consolidation and organization of large amounts of information, a change that has dramatically enhanced operational efficiency. In the medical field, digitalization has been accompanied by the increased use of keywords such as "3D," "automatization," and "network." The field of orthodontics is currently witnessing a major revolution in diagnosis and treatment as a result of the utilization of digital tools such as CBCT and intraoral scanners. This study explores the effects of digitalization at the levels of research, clinical care, and the operations of clinics respectively, and discusses the future prospects of orthodontic treatment.

9:00
Yanheng Zhou

INVISALIGN- CHANGES TO ORTHODONTICS TODAY

Yanheng Zhou

Professional Experience and Education

2002-present Professor, Department of Orthodontics, Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing, China
2018-2021 Adjunct Professor, Department of Orthodontics, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
2010-2015 Chair, Department of Orthodontics, Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing, China
2009-present Adjunct Professor, Department of Orthodontics, School of Dental Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA
2000-2010 Vice Chair, Department of Orthodontics, Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing, China
2000-2001 Associate Professor, Department of Orthodontics, Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing, China
1998-2000 Vice Chair, Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Beijing Medical University, Beijing, China
1997-2000 Associate Professor, Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Beijing Medical University, Beijing, China
1996-1997 Adv. Dip. University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
1993-1996 Assistant Professor, Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Beijing Medical University, Beijing, China
1989-1993 Ph.D. Beijing Medical University, Beijing, China
1984-1989 D.D.S. Xi'an Medical University, Xi'an, Shaanxi, China

Honors and Awards

2012 2nd prize, Chinese Medical Association, China
2012 2nd prize, Beijing Association for Science and Technology, China
2012 Mentor Award for Outstanding Doctoral Thesis, Peking University, China
2001 1st prize, Chinese Medical Award, China
2001 3rd prize, Beijing Scientific and Technical Achievements, China
2000 2nd prize, Science and Technology Award, Ministry of Education, China
2000 2nd prize, the 7th National Excellent Young Teacher Award, Ministry of Education, China
1997 3rd prize, Science and Technology Award, Ministry of Public Health, China

Research Interests

Adult orthodontics
Combined surgical and orthodontic approach
Orthodontic treatment in periodontal patients
Micro-screw anchorage
Customized lingual orthodontics
Invisible orthodontics
Mechanism and immunoregulation of orthodontic tooth movement
Application of stem cell and bioinspired material in oral tissue defects repair

Abstract

How Invisalign change the orthodontics? As we know, Invisalign was first released by Align Technology in 1997. After 23 years' growth and development, the Invisalign has changed the life of our orthodontists. The Invisalign has changed the way how the orthodontists treat the patients, and also the way how the orthodontists work at the clinic. At the same time, The Invisalign has changed the way how the patients come to see the orthodontists. The Invisalign has made the orthodontic treatment more invisible and more comfortable. The Invisalign has also made the opportunity for those patients who couldn't receive the orthodontic treatment with conventional braces.

Martin Antonio V Reyes

Title : Pre-restorative/ prosthodontic orthodontics : Balancing the Esthetic and Functional Needs of our Patients

Martin Antonio V Reyes

Professional Experience and Education

1996 Doctor of Dental Medicine University of the Philippines
1999 Certificate of Proficiency in Orthodontics University of the Philippines
2003 Masters of Science in Dentistry University of the Philippines
2003-2016 Visiting Consultant Orthodontics Asia/Arrail Dental Shanghai China
2004-Present Professorial Lecturer University of the Philippines Post Graduate Program in Orthodontics
At Present Visiting Professor Orthodontic Department St. Mary's Hospital Seoul Korea
2010-Present CEO Dentphix Inc Ortigas East Pasig

Honors and Awards

Philippine Dental Association : Outstanding President Affiliate Society

Research Interests

Skeletal Maturity Indicators for Orthodontics
Bracket Mesh Interphase

Abstract

Over the past decade, advances in technology have paved the way for newer restorations fulfilling both esthetic and functional needs of our patients. Long span restorations, bridges, and plates have stepped aside for modern day bio compatible fixtures with superior quality making our treatment much more conservative bridging the gap between what is esthetically pleasing and functionally stable. One thing that has not changed much is the importance of occlusion as one of the main considerations in the treatment planning for restorative and prosthodontic cases. In this modern day of dentistry, planning for veneers, crowns, bridges and implants requires a TEAM APPROACH in order to achieve the best possible outcome. The orthodontic specialist plays a very important role in the establishment of occlusion placing the teeth in the best possible positions that will allow easier placement of the restorations in a much more ideal manner while maintaining a stable and harmonious bite that will ensure the longevity of not only the restoration itself but the supporting structures as well. This lecture will put emphasis on some treatment planning guidelines for adjunctive orthodontic procedures such as space management, control of midline, strategic movement of molars , planning for implants and veneers and other procedures that will help to establish both an eshtetically pleasing smile, healthy look and stable bite in preparation for other restorative and prosthodontic treatment.
.

Jayesh S. Rahalkar

Contemporary Orthodontic management of loss of maxillary central incisors

Jayesh S. Rahalkar

Brief Biodata

Dr. Jayesh S. Rahalkar
MDS(Bom), M Orth RCS (Edinburgh)(UK), FDS RCS (Edingburgh)(UK), DNB (Orthodontics), Diplomate of Indian Board of Orthodontics (DIBO)

Professional experience & Education

  • Mini Residency at Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea in 2016
  • FDS RCS (Edin)(UK) in 2014 by the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh, United Kingdom
  • Diplomate of National Board (DNB) in the subject of Orthodontics by the National Board of Examinations, New Delhi in 2005.
  • M Orth RCS (Edin) (UK) in 2004 by the Royal College of Surgeons, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
  • Board Certified Diplomate of Indian Board of Orthodontics (DIBO) in 2003.
  • Master of Dental Surgery (MDS) in Orthodontics and Dentofocial Orthopedics from Govt. Dental College & Hospital, Mumbai in 1996.
  • Bachelor of Dental Surgery (BDS) from the Govt. Dental College & Hospital, Mumbai, in 1992 by standing first class first in the University of Bombay
  • Exclusive Orthodontic Practice since 1996 till date
  • Former Head; and currently working as Professor and PG Guide, Department of Orthodontics at Dr.D.Y.Patil Dental College and Hospital, Pimpri, Pune
  • Honorary Consultant Orthodontist at Deenanath Mangeshkar Hospital, Pune. He is also a team member of the complete cleft care team at Deenanath Mangeshkar Hospital.

Honours and Awards

  • Past - Chairman, Indian Board of Orthodontics 2018-2019
  • Director of Indian Board of Orthodontics in 2014 to 2019
  • Executive Committee Member of Indian Orthodontic Society (IOS)(2013-14, 2014-15, 2015-16, 2017-18, 2018-19)
  • Fellow of World Federation of Orthodontics (FWFO)
  • International Member of American Association of Orthodontists (AAO)
  • He is the recipient of the prestigious Best Outgoing student's trophy for his academic excellence

Research Interests

  • Temporary Anchorage Devices
  • Accelerated Orthodontics
  • Interdisciplinary Orthodontics

Abstract

Tooth size arch length discrepancy (TSALD) is the main reason for the decision of extraction of dental units from the arches. The space thus created is used for alignment / decrowding or retraction of procumbent anteriors. The most common choice of extraction, for the space gaining in the management of malocclusion, is premolars. In some clinical situations, molars may have to be extracted if they have a poor prognosis. But there are a few cases where maxillary central incisor might be missing / avulsed / need extraction due to bad endodontic / restorative prognosis.

The manangement of the loss and/or extraction of the maxillary central incisor requires interdisciplinary orthdontic treatment. Carefully planned treatment mechanics and pre-charting of the post-treatment occlusal relationship along with proper group functional occlusal scheme are required for a better and stable final outcome. Thus the treatment protocol and mechanics for such cases are different than the routine mechanics. The adjunct periodontal, restorative and prosthodontic procedures require correct timing and need to be executed with perfection.

This presentation will discuss a rationale for extraction of maxillary central incisor, space closure mechanics; and highlight some of the problems and pitfalls with their successful management with presentation of clinical cases.

Mike Razza

Veracity in an Era of Rampant Industry Disruption: What is the Role of the ASO?

Mike Razza

Professional Experience and Education

Employment:

2009-present Associate Professor - Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry University of Western Australia
2002-2006 Senior Lecturer - Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry University of Western Australia
1993-present Private Specialist practice Orthodontics. The Orthodontists Booragoon, Subiaco and Broome
1991-2004 Lecturer - Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry University of Western Australia
1990-1991 Clinical Research Associate University of Western Australia Dental School
1987-1990 Graduate Orthodontic Resident, UMKC School of Dentistry, Dept of Orthodontics, Kansas City, Missouri, USA
1986-1987 Dental Health Programs, Inc. Dallas, Texas

Professional Associations and Memberships

American Association of Orthodontists
World Federation of Orthodontists
Asian Pacific Orthodontic Association
Australian Dental Association
Delta Sigma Delta
International College of Dentists - Australasian Section Pierre Fauchard Academy
Australian Society of Orthodontists, Inc.

2016-present ASO Chairman Education Committee
2012-2014 ASOWA Branch President
2010-2018 ASO Representative to the APOS
2010-2016 ASOWA Branch Council
2010-2012 ASO Federal President
2008-2010 ASO Federal Chairman Australasian Orthodontic Board and ASO Federal Vice-President
2006-2008 ASO Federal Chairman Orthodontic Services Committee
2002-2012 ASO Federal Council
1996-2002 AOC Scientific Chairmen - 18th AOC March 2002

Education

Bachelor of Science - Sam Houston State University 1982
Doctor of Dental Surgery - Baylor College of Dentistry 1986
Certificate Orthodontics - University of Missouri at Kansas City 1990

Distinctions and Honours

2014 Distinguished Service Award - ASO, Inc.
2017 Honorary Life Membership - ASO, Inc.
Australian Orthodontic Board - Certified Board Member

Abstract

The profession of orthodontics is constantly under siege from differing forms of Industry Threats, Challenges and Disrupters. It is imperative that orthodontic professionals and professional societies or associations provide clear, honest, evidence-based information regarding orthodontic treatment to the public. In my opinion, it is a responsibility of professional associations or societies to mount public education campaigns to counter the Industry Threats, Challenges and Disrupters to the professional provision of orthodontic care. The Australian Society of Orthodontists (ASO)Public Education Campaign is at the forefront of public education on the benefits of seeking treatment from a highly educated orthodontist and providing the public with warnings regarding unconventional treatments and treatment delivery systems. This presentation will explore some of the Industry Threats, Challenges and Disrupters and display elements of the ASO's campaign to educate the public of the benefits of seeking an orthodontist's opinion and the risks of unconventional orthodontic delivery systems.

Desmond Ong

Management strategies for compromised first permanent molars: An orthodontic perspective

Desmond Ong

Professional Experience and Education

2017- Present Clinical Academic in Orthodontics University of Queensland, School of Dentistry, Brisbane, Australia
2011- Present Private Practice in Orthodontics, Townsville, Australia
2008 Membership in Orthodontics, Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons
2006-2010 Private Practice in Orthodontics, Gold Coast, Australia
2006-2010 Senior Lecturer in Orthodontics University of Queensland, School of Dentistry, Brisbane, Australia
2005 Membership in Orthodontics, Royal College of Surgeons, Edinburgh
2005 MDSc (Orthodontics) University of Queensland, School of Dentistry, Brisbane, Australia
2000 BDSc (Hons) University of Queensland, School of Dentistry, Brisbane, Australia

Honors and Awards

2016 Raj Prasad Award (Australian Society of Orthodontists)
2006 Young Lecturer Award (Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons)
2000 Australian Society of Periodontology Medallion

Research Interests

3D Technology in Orthodontics
TADs
Autotransplantation

Abstract

Compromised first permanent molars are relatively common in the adolescent population due to caries and/or developmental defects. Compromised first permanent molars with poor long-term prognosis are commonly associated with both short and long-term clinical dilemmas.

Several management strategies are available for both children and adolescents, depending upon the stage of dental development and type of malocclusion. In the majority of situations, compromised first permanent molars can be removed in conjunction with comprehensive orthodontic treatment, with complete closure of the extraction space. Temporary anchorage devices (TADs) can be used to facilitate predictable closure of large first permanent molar extraction spaces, particularly in the lower arch.

Autotransplantation of unerupted third molars into compromised first permanent molar extraction sites does warrant serious consideration where the long-term prognosis of a tooth is questionable, suitable donor teeth at the ideal stage of root development are present and where restorative implant placement is not possible due to expected future facial growth and dentoalveolar change.

This presentation will discuss the important case-specific diagnostic information required to determine the most appropriate management strategy for an individual patient.

Clinical Practice and Support Staff (3): Marketing and Practice Management

9:40-11:30

Clinical Practice and Support Staff (3): Marketing and Practice Management

Elizabeth M. Barrett

Marketing "On Message" : The Eight Step Discipline in Action

Elizabeth M. Barrett

Professional Experience and Education

2019-2020 Practice Administrator for Matthew J. Busch, D.D.S., Ltd.
2002-2019 Practice Administrator for Musich,D.D.S.and Busch,D.D.S.,Ltd.
1976-2002 Practice Administrator for David R.Musich,D.D.S.,Ltd.
2018 Speaker AAO Annual Session, Washington, DC
2017 Speaker AAO Annual Session, San Diego, CA
2016 Speaker Illinois Society of Orthodontists Meeting
2015 Speaker AAO Annual Session, San Francisco, CA
2011 Panelist AAO Annual Session - Practice Transition - Chicago, IL
2010 Speaker NESO Meeting, Montreal, Canada
2008-2009 Member AAO Voluntary Certification Steering Committee
2006 Speaker SWSO Annual Meeting
2006 Speaker AAOMS Meeting, San Diego, CA
2005 Speaker CDABO Annual Meeting, New Mexico
2004 Paper Presentation at Angle East Meeting, Boston, MA
2004 Speaker AAO Annual Session, Orlando, FL
2003 Guest Speaker Profit Marketing Users Group Meeting
2001 Moderator AAO Annual Session - Toronto, Canada
2001 Panelist AAO Annual Session - Toronto, Canada
2000 Speaker AAO Annual Session, Chicago, IL
1997-2017 Program Editor Eastern Component of EHASO Annual Meeting
1997 Speaker AAO Annual Session, Philadelphia, PA
1996 Speaker AAO Annual Session, Denver, CO
1977-1997 Program Coordinator-Dentofacial Study Group of Greater Chicago
1973 Bachelor of Arts Degree from St. Xavier College Chicago, IL

Honors and Awards

2017 Honorary Member of the Edward H. Angle Society of Orthodontists

Research and Interests

Enhancing Case Presentation Using Non-Verbal Communication Skills
Systematic Orthodontic Fee Calculation Method
Practice Transition and the Role of Orthodontic Team Members
Systems of Operation in Orthodontic Practice Management

Abstract

Course Description
As practices develop and become busier, orthodontic teams can benefit from a straight forward marketing plan that doubles as a risk management program. The speaker has worked in orthodontic practice management for 44 years and, with David R. Musich, D.D.S., M.S., has developed The Eight Step Discipline system for standardized communication as an enhanced due diligence protocol. Initially, each step was designed to create specific solutions for treatment planning and communication with patients, parents, general dentists and dental specialists. However, it quickly became apparent that The Eight Step Discipline is much more than a system of communication; it is also an invaluable tool for risk management in patient charting and a subtle, but effective marketing strategy that leaves a lasting impression. This program will present details of The Eight Step Discipline, its practical application in specific patient situations, its capacity to enhance due diligence in treatment record keeping and its impact on practice marketing results.

Learning Objectives

Attendees of this course will be able to:

1. Understand the crucial connection between standardized communication and effective systems of operation.

2. Identify individual team member roles in the internal and external marketing of the practice.

3. Recognize the marketing and risk management benefits of 4 vital treatment reports which are generated at specific milestones in the orthodontic patient's course of treatment.

Clinical Practice and Support Staff (3): Marketing and Practice Management

Yuko Shimizu

Challenges of being a Dental Hygienist in a foreign land

Yuko Shimizu

Professional experience and education

2009- 2019 The Orthodontist, Perth WA, Australia
2007-2008 Associate Degree in Dental Hygiene, Graduated Curtin University of Technology, Perth WA, Australia
2002 Post graduate dental hygienist workshop, University of Gothernburg, Sweden
1998-2002 Ohgushi dental clinic, Tokyo Japan
1996-1998 Graduated Tokyo Dental Association Dental Hygienist College, Tokyo Japan

Yuko Shimizu
Dental Hygienist, Perth, Western Australia

Yuko Shimizu currently works as a dental hygienist at The Orthodontist, Perth's leading orthodontic clinic. After graduating from Tokyo Dental Association Dental Hygienist College in her homeland, Japan, in 1998, Yuko's passion for travel brought her to multicultural Australia, where she fell in love with the laid-back lifestyle. In order to live and work in Australia, Yuko undertook extensive English language studies before gaining her Associate Degree in Dental Hygiene from Curtin University of Technology in 2008. In addition to her duties in the practice's two Perth metropolitan clinics, Yuko is also part of a travelling team providing orthodontic treatment to patients in remote communities. Her daily interaction with patients from various cultural backgrounds has added a new dimension to Yuko's technical skills as a dental hygienist, making her a value member of the orthodontic services team at her practice. Yuko is a member of the Dental Hygienists Association of Australia.

Abstract

While technical skills as a dental hygienist can be transferred across borders, as a Japanese trained dental hygienist, the cultural exposure of working in Australia has been the biggest challenge, but also the most rewarding aspect of my career to date.
Less than 2% of Japan's population is non-Japanese, so the patient profile is very similar across the country. In Australia however, almost a third of the population are born overseas, every day brings new opportunities to learn more about the people we treat, and how to cater to their needs to ensure that they receive the very best of care.
Working in this environment has taught me to appreciate ethic and cultural diversity, how to communicate with individual patients accordingly, and how to respect the cultural sensitivities of my patients and colleagues in the clinic.
Through sharing my experiences, this presentation will discuss how cultural exposure and understanding can improve technical performance as a dental hygienist - something that simply can't be taught in a structured learning environment.

Clinical Practice and Support Staff (3): Marketing and Practice Management

Hajime Kamiyasu

Periodontal consideration -Don't start Orthodontic treatment without the charting !-

Hajime Kamiyasu
1986 DDS, Nippon Dental University
1991 DDSc, Nippon Dental University Graduate school in Orthodontics
1995-1997 The University of Michigan Graduate periodontal clinic
1998- Kamiyasu Orthodontic Office
2008 MOrth, Membership in Orthodontics of Edinburgh
2018 Board of the Japanese Orthodontic Society

Abstract

Recently, many adult patients who are seeking orthodontic treatment visit orthodontic offices. Although there is regional difference, it is said that percentage of adult patients is about 20~30%.
Different from child or teenage patients, providers in orthodontic offices need another consideration for adult patients. The government survey in 2011 found the prevalence of moderate to severe periodontitis in 25~54 years of age were 18~34% in Japan.
Periodontal disease is called as silent disease, so it is difficult to be aware of involved this disease for patients. And for us, it is hard to evaluate condition of gingival tissue with just visual examination.
Oral cavity harbors more than 700 kinds of resident microbial species, they are usually as good bacterium and keep balance between periodontal tissue and microbiota. However, periodontal disease occurs due to break down of this equilibrium.
After placement of orthodontic appliances, plaque accumulation by inadequate oral hygiene enhances gingival inflammation such as reddish and bleeding. This kind of situation results in increasing periodontal pathogenic anaerobic microbial species in the subgingival site.
As above, we need to recognize patient´s history of periodontal treatment and know state of periodontal tissue before or during orthodontic treatment.

Main points are following,
Equilibrium between periodontal tissue and microbial species
Subgingival microbiota after placement of orthodontic appliances
Necessity of monitoring of periodontal tissue during orthodontic treatment
In order not to develop to periodontitis from gingivitis

Early Treatment

Peter Ngan

Early treatment of Class III malocclusion with TADs

Peter Ngan

Dr. Peter Ngan is the Branson-Maddrell Endowed Professor and Chair in the Department of Orthodontics, West Virginia University School of Dentistry. Dr. Ngan is also an Honorary Professor in the Faculty of Dentistry at the University of Hong Kong and a Guest Professor at the Wuhan University School of Stomatology. Dr. Ngan holds a dental degree from Harvard University, School of Dental Medicine and Certificates in Orthodontics, Pediatric Dentistry and Hospital Dentistry from the University of Pennsylvania, School of Dental Medicine/ Children Hospital of Philadelphia. He is a member of the Angle East (Eastern Component of the Edward H. Angle Society). He is a Diplomate of the American Board of Orthodontics and a Diplomate of the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry. He was inducted as Fellow of the American College of Dentists (October, 2008), Fellow of the International College of Dentists (October 2010) and Fellow of the Pierre Fauchard Academy (May 2011). Dr. Ngan's research interest includes growth and development, biology of tooth movement, dentofacial orthopedics, orthodontic appliance therapy, oral implantology, orthodontic bonding systems and adult interdisciplinary treatment.

Abstract

Young patients with a Class III malocclusion and maxillary deficiency are treated primarily with facemasks. However, because the force is applied to the teeth, the inevitable mesial migration of the dentition can result in anterior crowding and the need for a subsequent extraction therapy. Furthermore, the desired skeletal effect of this commonly used approach often turns out to be less than expected. To increase the advancement of the maxilla, facemask therapy is often combined with rapid palatal expansion (RPE) since stimulation of the midface sutures is expected. Temporary Anchorage Devices (TADs) can be inserted in the palate to avoid mesial migration of the upper molars when using a facemask and to minimize tipping or periodontal damage to the bicuspids /deciduous molars when expanding the maxilla. The author will present early Class III cases treated with the help of TADs and the skeletal and dental changes one will expect with the use of this device. After this lecture, the attendees of this lecture will be able to identify the type of Class III patients suitable to be treated with facemask, RPE and TADs; identify the various factors such as growth pattern, growth potential and the severity of malocclusion that can affect the treatment outcome with this appliance; and learn how to design and fabricate RPE with TADs that can be used in conjunction with a facemask.

Early Treatment

James A McNamara

Expansion in the early mixed dentition: Is it worth the effort?

James A McNamara

Professional Experience

Thomas M and Doris Graber Endowed Professor Emeritus, Department of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry, and Research Professor Emeritus, Center for Human Growth and Development, the University of Michigan. Private practice of Orthodontics, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Education

Bachelor's degree in Speech, University of California Berkeley; Dental education and Certificate of Orthodontic Specialty, The University of California San Francisco. Master's and Doctorate in Anatomy, The University of Michigan.

Honors and Awards

Milo Hellman Research Award; American Association of Orthodontists, 1973; E. Sheldon Friel Memorial Award, European Orthodontic Society, 1979; Research Recognition Award, American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, 1983; James E Brophy Distinguished Service Award, the American Association of Orthodontists, Albert H. Ketcham Memorial Award, American Board of Orthodontics, 2008; Beni Solow Memorial Award, European Orthodontic Society, 2011; Edward H. Angle Memorial Lecturer, American Association of Orthodontists, 2014; Angle Heritage Award, Edward H Angle Society of Orthodontists, 2017.

Research Interests

Skeletal and dentoalveolar effects produced by orthodontic, orthopedic and surgical treatments; normal craniofacial growth and development; the Cervical Vertebral Maturation method of growth assessment.

Abstract

This presentation describes four decades of research carried out at the University of Michigan that consider the clinical alteration of the transverse dimension of the face, with specific attention given to orthodontic and orthopedic treatment of patients in the early mixed dentition. The results of a series of clinical studies will be described that consider the etiology of dental crowding as well as treatment effects produced by expansion in the early mixed dentition or in the late mixed/early permanent dentition.

A protocol for early treatment will be described that includes the removable lower Schwarz appliance (40% of mixed dentition patients who are in need of rapid maxillary expansion), a bonded acrylic splint expander (100% of such patients), and placement of "temporary" anterior brackets (60% of patients). A series of retrospective and prospective studies will be presented, including an investigation considering the spontaneous improvement of Class II malocclusion following increase in the transverse dimension. The possible negative effect of maintaining or increasing lower anterior arch length on subsequent lower second molar eruption or impaction also will be discussed.

The results of these studies support the concept that intervention in the early mixed dentition can produce many favorable changes in the occlusion as the dentition matures. An ideal time to intervene in such patients is before the onset of puberty.

Early Treatment

Letizia Perillo

Early treatment of dentoskeletal Class II malocclusion

Letizia Perillo

Professional Experience and Education

Letizia Perillo is full Professor and Dean of the School of Dentistry, Chairman of the NEBEOP Postgraduate Orthodontic Program, Head of the Orthodontic Division at Multidisciplinary Department of Medical-Surgical and Dental Specialties, University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, Naples. She is 2018-2020 Visiting Professor at University of Alexandria, Egypt, 2021 Elected President of the Italian Society of Orthodontics (SIDO), 2022 Elected President of the Mediterranean Orthodontic Integration Project (MOIP), 2018-2020 International Ambassador of the American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) for SIDO, Member of the WFO, AAO, EHASO, EOS, SIDO and CH Tweed Foundation (clinical instructor), and member of the Editorial Board of several orthodontic and dental journals. Prof Perillo graduated in Medicine and Surgery in 1986 and specialized in Orthodontics in 1989 at the University of Naples Federico II. She completed her orthodontic training with a postgraduate fellowship at the University of Michigan in 1993 and a PhD in Interceptive Orthodontics at the University of Florence in 1997.

Honors

  • Dean of the School of Dentistry, 2018-present
  • Postgraduate Orthodontic Program Director, 2008-present
  • Italian Orthodontic Society (SIDO) President, 2021
  • Mediterranean Orthodontic Integration Project (MOIP) President, 2022
  • American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) International Ambassador, 2018-2020
  • World Federation of Orthodontists (WFO) Representative, 2018-2019
  • Progress in Orthodontics (PIO) Associate Editor, 2017-present
  • EH Angle Society of Orthodontists (EHASO) North Atlantic Components, Member, 2014-present
  • CH Tweed International Foundation, Active member and Clinical instructor, 1999-present
  • European Orthodontic Society (EOS) Member, 1995-present

Awards

  • WJB Houston Poster Award: The association between the morphology of the upper arch and palate and buccally displaced maxillary canines in mixed dentition: a three-dimensional study. 94th EOS Congress. Edinburgh, UK, June 2018
  • Poster Prize: Universal three-dimensional reference system for craniofacial deformities. 6th MOIP Congress, Alexandria, Egypt, October 2018
  • Poster Prize: Descriptive superimposition of CBCT generated digital cast. 6th MOIP Congress. Alexandria, Egypt, October 2018
  • Oral Presentation Prize: Gingival crevicular fluid changes during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances: evaluation by vibrational spectroscopies. 6th MOIP Congress. Alexandria, Egypt, October 2018
  • Poster Prize F. Bruno: Association between 3D palatal morphology and upper arch dimensions in buccally displaced maxillary canines in mixed dentition. 49th SIDO. Florence, Italy, October 2018
  • Poster Prize: Association between 3D palatal morphology and upper arch dimensions in buccally displaced maxillary canines in mixed dentition. 49th SIDO Congress, Florence, October 2018
  • Poster Prize: Rapid and Mixed maxillary expansion: comparison on postero-anterior cephalograms and dental casts. 5th MOIP Congress, Limassol, Cyprus, November 2016
  • APOS Trends Award for the Best Reviewers. Bali, Indonesia, September 2016
  • Poster Prize: Early Class III treatment: RME/FM vs SEC III. SIDO Congress, Milan, October 2015
  • Oral Presentation Prize: Friction forces during sliding mechanics: in vitro comparison of conventional, Self-ligating and Low-friction brackets. SIDO Congress, Rome, March 2013

Research Interests

Her main research topics are early treatment, non-extraction treatment, cleft lip and palate, dentofacial orthopedics and genetics.

Abstract

One of the most heated controversies in Orthodontics concerns the role of early treatment in the correction of dentoskeletal Class II malocclusions by mandibular retrusion. Thus, a treatment for stimulating mandibular growth with functional appliances is often indicated. One of the most famous appliances is the Function Regulator (FR-2), proposed in the 1960s by Frankel. According to the literature, FR-2 treatment is able to correct a Class II malocclusion. However, some studies highlighted an increase in mandibular growth, others reported only restriction of maxillary growth or dentoalveolar effects. This lecture will show primarily the importance of the differential diagnosis in the treatment for dentoskeletal Class II malocclusions, and then the changes associated with the FR-2 treatment and their stability after a 20-year follow-up.

Clear Aligners

Jorge Faber

Orthodontic Treatment for the Elderly Patient: Old is New

Jorge Faber

Dr. Faber has published over 100 scientific papers and has lectured in all continents

2011-2017 Editor-in-chief Journal of the World Federation of Orthodontics
2006-2011 Editor-in-chief, Dental Press Journal of Orthodontics
2018-2020 Professor and researcher, Post Graduate Program in Dentistry, University of Brasilia
2004-2018 Professor, University of Brasilia
2003 PhD in Biology-Morphology, University of Brasilia
1994 MS in Orthodontics, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro
1989 DDS, University of Brasilia

Honors and Awards

College of Diplomates of the American Board of Orthodontics 2010 Case Report of the Year, American Journal of Orthodontics & Dentofacial Orthopedics.

Research interests

Orthodontics for an ageing population
Sleep apnea
Surgery First treatment

Abstract

Relatively little attention has been devoted to the smile esthetics of elderly people. Possibly, because orthodontics has been historically entwined with the treatment of children and adolescents. Only about 20 years ago adults started to be consistently treated, and several studies have demonstrated the benefits of orthodontic treatment for these individuals, as well as improvements in their quality of life. This presentation will show the results of a prospective trial which enrolled 42 patients who were 65 or older. The protocol consisted of a 6-month-pre-established treatment time with aligners. Our results showed that patients were highly satisfied with the esthetics of the partial treatments. Most patients found that the 6-month treatment time was acceptable and that the clinical results were very positive. The orthodontic treatment significantly improved patients quality of life and self-esteem. Aligner use was comfortable, however, several specific changes in aligner prescription were necessary to solve the common problems presented by this age group. Orthodontic treatment with aligners should be considered as a valuable contribution for older patients quality of life and self-esteem.

Clear Aligners

Benedict Wilmes

Improving the predictability of clear aligner therapy with mini-implants

Benedict Wilmes

Professional experience and Education

2013-2019 Professor at the Department of Orthodontics at the University of Duesseldorf, Germany
2004-2013 Research fellow at the Department of Orthodontics at the University of Duesseldorf, Germany
2000-2004 postgraduate training in orthodontics at 1996-2000 at the Department of Orthodontics at the University of Duesseldorf, Germany
1996-2000 postgraduate training in oral surgery at the Department of Maxillofacial Surgery at University of Muenster, Germany
1990-1996 Dentistry Student at University of Muenster, Germany

Honors and Awards

2007 First Prize of the German Orthodontic Society
2009 First Prize of the European Orthodontic Society
2015 Honorary Member of the South African Society of Orthodontists
2018 Best oral presentation from the 21st Meeting of German Society of Lingual Orthodontics
2019 Active Member of the Angle Society (Eastern Component)

Research interests

Non-compliant and invisible orthodontic treatment strategies (TADs, lingual orthodontics and aligner).
CAD-CAM Technologies

Abstract

Clear aligner therapy is ubiquitous in contemporary orthodontics. However, the predictability of achieving specific tooth movements with clear aligners including space closure, distalization and expansion is not absolute. The adjunctive use of customised appliances, retained with mini-implants positioned in the anterior palate, provides the clinician the opportunity to realize specific treatment objectives with greater precision and accuracy. They can be used concomitantly, or as an intermediary step prior to the fabrication of clear aligners.

Clear Aligners

Theodore Eliades

Degradation of aligners: clinical variables and concerns

Theodore Eliades

Professional Experience and Education

2017- Interim Director, Institute of Oral Biology, Center of Dental Medicine, University of Zurich
2013- Director of Research Center of Dental Medicine, University of Zurich
2011- Professor and Director, Clinic of Orthodontics & Pediatric Dentistry, Center of Dental Medicine, University of Zurich
2005-2011 Associate Professor, Department of Orthodontics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
2019 DSc, University of Manchester, UK
2002 PhD, University of Manchester, UK
2002 Doctorate in Medical Sciences, University of Athens, Greece
1994 Certificate of specialty, Ohio State University, USA
1993 MS, Ohio State University, USA
1990 Diploma in Dental Surgery, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece

Honors and Awards

2017 invited Milton Sims Visiting Professor, University of Adelaide
2015 Jan Taylor Visiting Professor, Australian Foundation for Orthodontic Research and Education
2014 Northcroft memorial lecture, British Orthodontic Society
2014 Fellow, Institute of Physics
2010 Fellow, Royal Society of Chemistry
2009 Fellow, Institute of Materials Minerals and Mining

Research Interests

Mechanics of materials and tissues, xenoestrogenicity of polymers, degradation of materials, retrieval analyses clinical aspects of materials application and treatment efficiency, dental hard tissues and bonding

Abstract

The purpose of the lecture is to highlight the changes occurring during the intraoral service of aligners which includes an array of compositional, surface, structural and mechanical effects. The lecture has two axes: the establishment of effects reported to involve softening, decrease in roughness in the areas which are coming in contact with composite attachments, thereby substantiating a wear mechanism; changes in color, and structural alterations are also described. Having demonstrated the foregoing effects, a number of potential effects on the clinical aspects of aligner treatment and their biological reactivity are discussed. Evidence from studies reporting effect of aligner on oral flora, the release of compounds such as attrition products, release of BPA and monomers as well as attachment composite ageing will be shown. In addition, the assessment of their biological reactivity with emphasis on the cytotoxicity and xenoestrogenicity will be discussed, as well as the impact on efficiency arising from the alteration of hardness, stiffness and relaxation of materials. The implication of these changes and effects in everyday practice will be postulated and guidelines for the minimizing of relevant unwanted effects will be proposed.

Biology in Orthodontics

Nan E. Hatch

Biologic control of tooth movement: is it possible and, if so, how?

Nan E. Hatch

Dr. Nan Hatch is an Associate Professor of Dentistry, the Lysle E. Johnston Junior Collegiate Professor of Orthodontics and Chair of the Department of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry at the University of Michigan. Dr. Hatch received her clinical orthodontic training and a PhD in Molecular and Cell Biology from the University of Washington in Seattle. Dr. Hatch has previously served as the Great Lakes Association of Orthodontists representative to the American Association of Orthodontists's Council on Scientific Affairs, as president of the Craniofacial Biology Group of the International Association for Dental Research and on the Awards Review Committee of the International Association for Dental Research.

Dr. Hatch is certified by the American Board of Orthodontists. She has mentored numerous orthodontic residents on their research, six of whom have won research awards from the American Association of Orthodontists or the American Association of Orthodontists Foundation. Dr. Hatch's research interests include basic and translational research in bone biology and the molecular etiology of craniofacial anomalies, as well as the deveopment of biologic mediators for the control of orthodontic tooth movement. Her research has been funded by the American Association of Orthodontists Foundation, The Hartwell Foundation, and the National Institute of Dental And Craniofacial Research.

Abstract

Orthodontic forces stimulate cell signaling that leads to tooth movement via osteoclast-mediated resorption of alveolar bone adjacent to the pressure side of tooth roots. Because tooth movement is a biologic process, drugs developed to modulate inflammatory cell signaling pathways and/or bone cell activity can be utilized to control orthodontic tooth movement. This presentation will provide current results demonstrating the impact of locally injected drugs for increasing the speed of tooth movement, enhancing orthodontic anchorage during tooth movement, and inhibiting orthodontic relapse after movement. Results and discussion of potential iatrogenic effects of delivered drugs will be presented. Novel methods for polymer-based drug delivery systems to control movement of specified teeth in the mouth will also be discussed.

Biology in Orthodontics

David S. Carlson

Orthodontics in the age of precision medicine

David S. Carlson

Professional Experience and Education

2003 Vice President for Research and Dean, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M Health Science Center.
1993 Professor and Chairman, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University College of Dentistry
1983 Professor, Department of Orthodontic and Pediatric Dentistry, University of Michigan
1978 Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, University of Michigan
1978 Research Scientist, Center for Human Growth and Development, University of Michigan
1974 Postdoctoral Research Scholar, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Michigan
1974 PhD Physical Anthropology, University of Massachusetts

Honors and Awards

2016 Emeritus Regents Professor, Texas A&M University
1998 Regents Professor, Texas A&M University
1995 Robert E. Gaylord Endowed Chair of Orthodontics, Texas A&M College of Dentistry, Texas A&M University
1990 Honorary, American Association of Orthodontists

Research Interests

Integration of basic, applied, and clinical research on normal and abnormal development and growth of the craniofacial complex
Growth, function, and treatment of the temporomandibular joint
Development of concepts, theories, and paradigms related to craniofacial growth and form
Role of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms in normal craniofacial development, growth, and dentofacial treatment

Abstract

Understanding of the mechanisms of craniofacial development and growth have improved considerably due to advances in the fields of developmental biology and genomics as well as translational orthodontic research. Overly simplistic perceptions of a dichotomy between heredity and the environment, or function, dominated orthodontic approaches to the treatment of abnormal craniofacial growth, from significant dentofacial deformities to simpler malocclusion, throughout the Twentieth Century. This lecture will address the evolution of concepts of heredity and genomics as they relate to craniofacial growth, malocclusion, and dentofacial treatment. The lecture will conclude with a discussion of the potential offered by the approach offered by the emerging field of precision medicine for diagnosis and treatment of dentofacial deformities.

Biology in Orthodontics

Adilson Luiz Ramos

Orthodontic movement through alveolar atrophic bone

Adilson Luiz Ramos
1994 - 2020 Associate Professor, State University of Maringa, Brazil
2019 - 2020 Director of the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics
2003 - 2006 Former Editor-in-chief of the Dental Press Journal of Orthodontics , the official publication of the Brazilian Association of Orthodontics
1998 - 2001 PhD at State University of Sao Paulo UNESP, Araraquara, Brazil
1992 - 1995 MS in Orthodontics at University of Sao Paulo USP, Bauru, Brazil
1989 - 1992 Residence Program at Craniofacial Anomalies Rehabilitation Hospital HRAC, University of Sao Paulo USP, Bauru, Brazil
1995 - 2020 Member of the Brazilian Association of Orthodontics
1998 - 2020 Member of the World Federation of Orthodontics
1996 - 2020 Member of the American Association of Orthodontics
2019 - 2020 Guest Member of the Angle Society of Orthodontics, North Atlantic Component

Abstract

Orthodontic tooth movement through an alveolar atrophic ridge is a treatment alternative for improving the surrounding bone implant dimensions. Sometimes, such challenging movement is needed to close missing teeth arch spaces and to correct an occlusal discrepancy. This presentation will show some studies that discuss the advantages and side effects of such movement, as , for example, root resorption and bone dehiscence. During the presentation, clinical situations will illustrate this important orthodontic strategy, particularly in interdisciplinary treatments.

10:00
11:00
12:00
13:00

Class III Treatment

13:00-14:45

  • Hugo De¬†Clerck
  • Yijin Ren
  • Yuxing Bai

Eruption Disorders

Inger M Kjaer

Prediction and prevention of pathological tooth eruption

Inger M Kjaer
2015-2020 Professor Emerita at the University of Copenhagen and Consultant in dental and craniofacial deviations at the University Hospital Copenhagen, Denmark
2002-2015 Professor at the Orthodontic Institute, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
1999 Doctoral theses in Medicine. University of Copenhagen
1998-2002 Vice Dean at the faculty of Medicine, University of Copenhagen,Denmark
1997-2004 Board member representing Medicine and Science at the Central Academic Council, University of Copenhagen
1997-2000 Council member in EOS, European Orthodontic Society
1994-1998 Member of the committee responsible for health educations in the Ministery of Education.
1986-2002 Associate Professor at the Orthodontic Institute, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
1983-2005 Chairman for the board responsible for the odontological specialties in the Ministry of Health, Denmark
1983 Doctoral theses in Odontology
1975-1986 Director for a municipal dental service unit offering general dental treatment and orthodontic treatment for 5000 children
1970-1975 Research scholarships in oral biology and histochemistry
1964-1970 DDS, Fellowship at the Medical Center, University of California, San Francisco US and postgraduate training in orthodontics, Copenhagen.

Honors and Awards

2002 The Queen of Denmarks Cross of the Order, Dannebrog.
2002 Honorary member of DORS, The Danish Orthodontic Association
2009 Honorary member of FSO, The Danish Association for Orthodontic Specialists

Research interest

Bridging Prenatal human development with Postnatal human development
Etiology-based dental and craniofacial diagnostics
Neuro-orthodontics. The interrelationship between neurology and orthodontics

Abstract

Scientific understanding of the normal eruption process is a prerequisite for an evidence-based prediction and prevention of pathological tooth eruption.

Normal tooth eruption occurs in three eruption phases:
1) Early migration of tooth buds
2) Pre-gingival penetration
3) Post- gingival penetration.

The biological eruption process is based on interactions between the highly innervated root membrane,the periodontal membrane (peri-root tissue layers),
and in phase 3 also of the penetration ability of the crown follicle.

The three tissue types important for eruption are: the mucosal ectoderm, the mesodermal ectomesenchyme and the neuroectodermal peripheral nerves.
The eruption process occurs in genetically different jaw segments (fields), each innervated by specific nerve branches originated from different areas on the neural crest.

Pathological tooth eruption of incisors, canines, premolars and molars will be demonstrated and categorized according to the three eruption phases.

Phase 1: prediction and prevention is not possible.
Phase 2: primary retention and ectopia can in many cases be predicted from anamnesis, diseases (virus attacks), and sometimes prevented.
Phase 3: secondary retention can sometimes be predicted , but rarely prevented.

Pathological tooth eruptions (all phases) occur nearly always in phenotypically "weak dentitions" with several other dental deviations (agenesis,

taurodontism,invaginations,abnormal resorptions,tooth malformations) and often in dentitions with impacted molars in the preceding primary dentition.

Screening the seemingly normal primary and permanent dentitions with "individualized diagnostics eyes" (citation from professor Takayuki Kuroda) is the most important first step in prediction and preventing pathological tooth eruption.

Eruption Disorders

Ewa M. Czochrowska

Trans-alveolar transplantation for impacted teeth: scientific evidence and clinical practice

Ewa M. Czochrowska

Graduated as a dentist from the Dental Faculty in Warsaw, Poland. She finished a postgraduate training in orthodontics at the University in Oslo, Norway in 1997 then worked as a Research Fellow at the Orthodontic Department, Dental Faculty in Oslo until 2002. In 2003 she was awarded a PhD from the University in Oslo for a thesis on autotransplantation of teeth. For the publication from this work she received the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics Dewel Orthodontic Award in 2002. In 2014 she was awarded a habilitation in medical science from the Medical University in Warsaw on her work related to orthodontic treatment of patients with periodontitis.

Dr. Czochrowska was the President of the European Orthodontic Society and she host the EOS Congress in 2014 in Warsaw. She is the President of the Polish Orthodontic Society and the Active Member of the Angle Society of Europe and the European Board of Orthodontists. At present, she serves the position of the Secretary of the Angle Society of Europe. Dr. Czochrowska has organized 2 international congresses on tooth transplantation in 2016 (Sopot, Poland) and 2018 (Rotterdam, the Netherlands). Received Distinguish Teacher Award from the European Orthodontic Society for 2020. At present in the private practice in Warsaw and is working at the Department of Orthodontics, Medical University in Warsaw, Poland.

Dr. Czochrowska has authored and coauthored 10 book chapters and 50 scientific articles. She has lectured extensively worldwide on tooth transplantation and orthodontic treatment in patients with periodontal diseases.

Abstract

Treatment options for impacted teeth are related to the stage of root development, inclination of the impacted tooth, space conditions, status of adjacent teeth and patient's attitudes to treatment. Trans-alveolar transplantation, which is a surgical uprighting of an ectopic tooth, is an attractive option and it is usually performed, when orthodontic extrusion is difficult and extraction of an impacted tooth and orthodontic space closure are unfavorable from orthodontic perspective.
The highest survival and success rates upon tooth transplantation were documented for developing teeth, preferably at 1/2 to 3/4 final root development. Gentle removal of a donor tooth is crucial for the successful outcome, but in severely impacted teeth transplantation may be more difficult and therefore less predictable. Detection of tooth impaction at earlier stages of root development is important, because shorter teeth are easier to be removed and those teeth have a better chance for pulp revascularisation. The existing evidence related to the survival and success of surgically uprighted teeth will be summarized.
Trans-alveolar transplantation can be used to surgically upright impacted developing premolars, canines and upper incisors and clinical examples will be shown during the presentation. Key factors for success will be discussed including treatment planning and surgical indications for the donor selection, surgical technique, follow-up protocol and long-term results. The important benefit of trans-alveolar transplantation of developing teeth is the potential for bone preservation and regeneration, that will be shown during the lecture.

Eruption Disorders

Stella Chaushu

Failures in treating impactions - hindsight is 20/20, so learn from your mistakes

Stella Chaushu

Professional Experience and Education

2014 Full Professor, Hebrew University, Hadassah School of Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel
2010 Chairperson, Hebrew University, Hadassah School of Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel
2010 PhD, Hebrew University, Hadassah School of Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel
2007 Associate Professor, Hebrew University, Hadassah School of Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel
2002 Clinical Senior lecturer, Hebrew University, Hadassah School of Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel
1999 Clinical Lecturer, Hebrew University, Hadassah School of Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel
1989 DMD, Hebrew University, Hadassah School of Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel
1989 MSc, Hebrew University, Hadassah School of Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel

Honors and Awards

1984 Dean award for academic accomplishments during the first year of study.
1985 Dean award for academic accomplishments during the second year of study.
1986 Dean award for academic accomplishments during the first, second and third year.
1987 Golda Meir award for MSc thesis.
1989 Melvin Fener award for academic accomplishments during the fifth year of study.
1989 Dean award for academic accomplishments during the six year of study.
2003 magna cum laude for DMD thesis of student under my supervision
2007 Excellence in teaching award for undergraduate students (Dean list).
2013 Excellence in teaching award for undergraduate students (Rector list).
2013 Best poster award in the International Orthodontic Postgraduate Study Day, Kings College London Orthodontic Society, London, for student under my supervision
2013 Best poster award in the European Orthodontic Society Congress, Reykjavik, for student under my supervision.
2014 Dr. Joseph E. Johnson Clinical Award in AAO convention, New Orleans for the best table clinic of student under my supervision.
2014 Excellence in teaching award for undergraduate students (Rector list).
2014 Dr. Baruch and Fani Kaufman award for excellent doctoral degree thesis of student under my supervision.
2014 Best oral presentation award in the European Orthodontic Society Congress, Warsaw, for student under my supervision.
2015 Hatton Unilever award for best oral presentation in IADR congress, Dubrovnik, for student under my supervision.
2015 IADR LION Dental Research Award for Junior Investigators for student under my supervision.
2015 Charley Schultz resident scholar award in the annual AAO meeting, San Francisco, for the best basic science research of student under my supervision.
2016 Dewel clinical research award for the best clinical paper in 2016 by the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
2016 Best Oral Presentation in SIDO conference, Florence, for student under my supervision.
2016 BSODR GSK MINTIG award in PER IADR conference, Jerusalem, for student under my supervision.
2016 European GCARE University Research Award for student under my supervision.
2018 Third Place for the Dentsply Sirona Awards for student under my supervision
2019 First prize in the Three Minute Thesis competition at the IADR AADR CADR General Session in Vancouver, for student under my supervision.
2019 IADR CTOR Award For Student Excellence in Orthodontics Research at the IADR AADR CADR General Session, Vancouver, for student under my supervision.

Research Interests

Orthodontic treatment of impacted teeth
Orthodontic treatment of adult patients
The biology and immunology of orthodontic tooth movement
Orthodontic tooth movement into regenerative sites
Orthodontic treatment of patients with disabilities

Abstract

Every orthodontist in the world can align teeth, but when the principle aim of treatment is treating an impacted tooth, it is all or nothing - we either succeed or fail, and it is nothing in-between. Many factors that are not present in routine orthodontics complicate the treatment. The tooth is not visible, therefore accurate diagnosis of its three-dimensional position and relation with adjacent teeth is often difficult. A reliable anchorage unit which allows the application of controlled directional forces with minimal side effects on the anchorage teeth must be build-up. Close cooperation between the orthodontist and the oral surgeon is mandatory for the success of this approach. Mistakes are related to all the aspects of treatment and are not uncommon even in the hands of experts. Failures lead to malpractice lawsuits. However, mistakes sometimes occur due to lack of awareness of the whole dental profession to a specific issue which has not yet been studied and published. This lecture will cover different aspects of treatment of impacted canines and incisors, from what contributes to success through to the reasons for and the circumvention of failure and discuss mistakes seen in hindsight and how to overcome them.

Edgewise Appliance

Yves G Bolender

Is there any difference between conventional, passive self-ligating and active self-ligating brackets? A systematic review of the literature and network meta-analysis.

Yves G Bolender

Professional Experience and Education

2017 Chairman of the Department of Dento-facial Orthopedics, Faculty of Dental Surgery, University of Strasbourg, France.
2014 Director of the post-doctoral program in Orthodontics, Faculty of Dental Surgery, University of Strasbourg, France.
2012-present Associate Professor, Department of Dento-Facial Orthopedics, Faculty of Dental Surgery, University of Strasbourg, France.
2008-2012 Associate Professor, Department of Dento-Facial Orthopedics, Faculty of Odontology, University of Lorraine, Nancy, France.
2008 Full member of the Eastern Component of the Edward H. Angle Society of Orthodontists.
2008 PhD in Materials Science, Faculty of Science, University of Lorraine, Nancy, France.
1988 Master of Medical Sciences, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA.
1988 Certificate in Orthodontics, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Forsyth Dental Center, Boston, USA.
1983 DDS, Faculty of Dental Surgery, University of Strasbourg, France.

Honors and Awards

2016 Brainerd F. Swain Award of Excellence, Eastern Component of the Edward H. Angle Society of Orthodontists, Boston, MA meeting.
2009 Brainerd F. Swain Award of Excellence, Eastern Component of the Edward H. Angle Society of Orthodontists, Newport, RI meeting.
2003 Diplomate of the American Board of Orthodontics.

Research Interests

Evidence-based orthodontics. Materials science. Esthetics.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION : Self-ligating brackets are still being actively promoted by their respective distributors. What are the advantages to use these brackets in light of the existing literature ?
AIM: This review aims to test the null hypothesis that there is no difference in treatment efficiency between therapies undertaken with conventional, passive self-ligating or active self-ligating brackets. Most published reviews have pooled passive and active self-ligating brackets together, and compared the amalgamated self-ligating brackets to conventional brackets. By contrast this network meta-analysis compares two by two the three different bracket types: conventional, passive self-ligating and active self-ligating brackets.
MATERIAL AND METHOD:
An electronic search was performed in 3 databases (Pubmed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library) from their origin up to September 2018. Additional references were hand searched. Search was strictly restricted to randomized controlled trials and split-mouth design studies. A network meta-analysis was implemented to obtain multiple comparisons between therapies undertaken with the 3 bracket types. 51 variables which investigated the following items were analyzed: treatment duration, number of visits, alignment efficiency, rate of space closure, anchorage loss, perception of discomfort during the initial phase of treatment, pain experience during wire insertion or removal, time to ligate in or to untie an archwire, bonding failures, occlusal indices, transverse arch dimensional changes, incisor position modification with and without extractions, , root resorption, periodontal outcomes and finally oral health-related quality of life.

Edgewise Appliance

Heemoon Kyung

Revolution & evolution in my orthodontic treatment during the last 4 decades

Heemoon Kyung
1974,03-1980,02 College of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea
1980,03-1983,02 Orthodontic training,
Infirmary Hospital of Dental College, Kyungpook Natl. University
1986.05-present Fulltime Instructor & Professor, Dental School, Kyungpook Natl. Univ.
1991,04-1992,03 Visiting Professor, Department of Orthodontics,
Faculty of Dentistry, Osaka University, Japan
1996.01-1997.12 Visiting & Clinical Associate Professor,
Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry,
The University of British Columbia, Canada
2001.1-2003.1 Dean, College of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University
2003.10-present Founding member of World Society of Lingual Orthodontics
2007.11-2010.04 President, Korean Association of Lingual Orthodontists
2010.04-present Active member of Angle Society (East Branch)
2015.07-2017.07 President of World Society of Lingual Orthodontics
2016.04-2018.03 President of Korean Association of Orthodontists

Abstract

It has passed almost 4 decades since I made the first step into the field of orthodontics.The contemporary orthodontics was driven by Dr. Angle, who invented ribbonwise bracket and edgewise beracket, and advocated non-extraction treatment modility. Ironically, unlike most of Dr. Angle"s followers, Tweed and Begg, his outstanding two disciples, supported extraction treatment modility. Tweed succeeded to edgewise techniques, while Begg developed Begg thehnique inherited ribbonarch appliance in his home country in Australia. These two treatment mechanics have been mainstreams through orthodontic treatment history. Edgewise appliances, however, have become a general trend until now. Recent major advances in contemporary orthodontics are including direct bonding system which made lingual techniques possible, invisible aligner technique, microimplants, and digital technique including CBCT. Esthetic bracket, straight wire appliance, self-ligation bracket, customized bracket and indirect bonding thchnique are also evolving as new approaches. Further, development of resilient archwires such as Nitinol, TMA, and NiTi definitely contributed to successful orthodontic treatment . Heat Induction typodont system( HITS) invented by the speaker might be one of evolutionary tools for educating orthodontic treatment. Orthodontic treatment takes from several months to few years. Understanding biomechanics ahead of actual practice, HITS would be very useful device for clinical judgement in simulation alternatives or new ideas. Today I would like to share my experiences in orthodontic education and treatment during the last 4 decades, and discuss the future of the orthodontics.

Edgewise Appliance

Kazuhito Arai

Advancement of the Edgewise appliances: do they cover the natural human diversity?

Kazuhito Arai

Professional Experience and Education

2009 - Present Professor and Chair, School of Dentistry, Department of Orthodontics, Nippon Dental University
2008 Associate Professor, School of Dentistry, Department of Orthodontics, Nippon Dental University
2000 - 2001 Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Growth and Development (Orthodontics), Harvard School of Dental Medicine
1993 Assistant Professor, School of Dentistry, Department of Orthodontics, Nippon Dental University
1993 DDSc (Orthodontics), Graduate School of Dentistry, the Nippon Dental University
1987 DDS, School of Dentistry, the Nippon Dental University

Honors and Awards

2019 Best reviewer of the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics in 2018
2018 Article Award of Japanese Orthodontic Society,
2007 Eastern Component of the Angle Society of Orthodontists, Second Best Paper for Barney Swain Award
2005 Eastern Component of the Angle Society of Orthodontists, Second Best Paper for Barney Swain Award

Abstract

How do you select an edgewise appliance for your patient? Since Edward H. Angle invented the Edgewise appliance in the 1920s, declaring it "The latest and best in orthodontic mechanism", advances in the design have yet to be exhausted. Reports in the literature and some commercial advertisements highlight significant differences in craniofacial morphology, including tooth shape, between populations in different countries or geographic regions. This lecture presents the history of preadjusted bracket and preformed archwire design based on comparisons between the manufactured variation and natural diversity of human dentition in Japan and other counties.
<Learning objectives>
- Understand that individual variation is more important than ethnicity in terms of preadjusted edgewise appliance design.
- Recognize that manufactured variation in preadjusted edgewise appliance is not based on biological research.

Geraldine G Lee

Be ahead of the curve: In-house clear aligners

Geraldine G Lee

Professional Experience and Education

2008 - 2012 Associate Consultant, National Dental Centre (Singapore)
2009 - 2013 Clinical Tutor, Orthodontic Residency Programme, National University of Singapore (Singapore)
2012 - Present Clinical Director, The Orthodontic Clinic
2015-2017 President, Association of Orthodontists, Singapore
2016 - Present Key opinion Leader, 3Shape

Abstract

As intraoral scanners and digital workflows gain popularity in clinics everywhere, clinicians are able to increase their clinic offering with in-house clear aligners and differentiate themselves from the rest.
Dr Lee will take you through the process of fabricating clear aligner treatment for simple cases entirely within your dental clinic. She will discuss proper case selection, how to take digital impressions and create instant treatment simulations, and fabrication of the clear aligners in-house. The biomechanics of moving teeth will be discussed, as well as what to look out for when planning a treatment strategy.

Seongsik Kim

Miniscrews versus surgical archwires for intermaxillary fixation in adults after orthognathic surgery

Seongsik Kim

Education

1995- D.D.S. School of Dentistry, Pusan National University
1998- M.S.D. Graduate School of Dentistry, Pusan National University
2003- Ph.D. Graduate School of Dentistry, Pusan National University

Internship and Residencies

1996-1999 Resident in Orthodontics, Pusan National University Hospital

Academic Appointments

2003-2004 Research Fellow, Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital
2004-2008 Assistant Professor of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University
2009-2012 Associate Professor of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Pusan national University
2010 Visiting Professor, School of Dentistry, University of Florida, US
2013- Professor of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Pusan national University
2015-2016 Vice Dean, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University

Abstract

Intermaxillary fixation (IMF) has the role for the maxillomandibular relation and prevention of skeletal relapse during bone healing period after orthognathic surgery. In orthognathic surgery cases with large setback movement or more counterclockwise rotation of mandible, wire fixation can immediately produce a significant extrusive load on the anterior teeth, and this vertical force persists until muscle function adapts to the postoperative mandibular morphology and occlusion. To reduce the extrusive load on anterior teeth during IMF, we have employed orthodontic mini-implant fixation in the anterior region of the jaw. We investigated the differences of skeletal and dental changes according to intermaxillary fixation (IMF) types in adult patients with Class III malocclusion treated with same orthognathic surgical method. They were divided into 2 groups according to IMF types: surgical archwire fixation (Group 1) and orthodontic mini-implant fixation (Group 2). In each cephalogram, we compared the measurements presenting vertical and horizontal tooth position immediately after surgery (T0), 3-month after surgery (T1), and 6-month after surgery (T2). Cephalometric changes were compared with the one-way analysis of variance and Independent-sample t tests were used to compare for two groups. The upper incisor after surgery tended to be proclined in both groups, but there were no significant differences between the groups. Incisor overbite was increased from T0 to T1 in both groups significantly, and the screw fixation (Group 2) showed the little more increased overbite than wire fixation (Group 1). This study suggested that orthodontic surgical arch wire could be replaced with orthodontic mini-implant for IMF

Chai Kiat Chng

Surgery First Orthodontic Management

Chai Kiat Chng

Professional Experience and Education

2018-Present Chief Dental Officer, Singapore
2018-Present Registrar, Singapore Dental Council
2018-Present Head and Senior Consultant, Cleft and Craniofacial Dentistry Unit, KK Women's & Children's Hospital, Singapore
2019-Present Adjunct Associate Professor, Faculty Of Dentistry, National University of Singapore
2010-2017 Executive Secretary, Singapore Dental Council
2011-2013 President, Association of Orthodontists, Singapore
2004-2007 MDS Orthodontics, National University of Singapore
1996-2000 BDS, National University of Singapore

Honours and Awards

2012 Singapore Health Quality Service Award

Research Interests

Biomaterials.
Cleft and Craniofacial genomics.
3-D Imaging.
Professionalism and Ethics.

Abstract

As surgery first becomes more popular, the boundaries of the surgeon and the orthodontist becomes more intricately inter-twined when it comes to planning of such cases. It is therefore important that fundamental principles of both orthodontic and surgical aspects are understood by both for the successful planning of such cases. The paradigms of ortho-orthognathic management will be discussed and strategies to ensure successful and predictable outcomes in Surgery First.

Tsang Tsang, Franklin She

Aggravation of gummy smile by straight wire mechanics and its management with or without orthognathic surgery up to 10 year follow-up

Tsang Tsang, Franklin She

Professional experience and education

2004-2019 Owner, The Smile Clinic Orthodontic Center Limited, Hong Kong
2002-2019 Part-time clinical Lecturer, The University of Hong Kong
2014 Biomechanics summer course, Italy
1999-2002 Master in Orthodontics, The University of Hong Kong

Research interest

Bone biology
Orthodontics camouflage of dentofacial deformites
TADs and Segmented arch technique

Abstract

Two female patients presented with gummy smile, maxillary dentoalveolar protrusion and total vertical maxillary excess, retroclined incisors, and increased overbite received orthodontic camouflage with straight wire mechanics by general dentists. The treatments caused severe bowing of upper occlusal plane which aggravated the gummy smile and had led them to seek specialist care. They were successfully managed by orthodontic camouflage and combined surgical orthodontic treatment, respectively, in conjunction with the application of miniscrews on straight wire mechanics. Aggravation of gummy smile by straight wire mechanics, use of visual treatment objective to differentiate between orthodontic camouflage and surgical cases, and LeFort I segmentalization were discussed.

Chairat Charoemratrote

Biomechanics innovation for Class III non-surgery

Chairat Charoemratrote

Education

1981-1987 DDS Chulalongkorn University, Thailand
1989-1991 M.Sc. (Orthodontics) Chulalongkorn University, Thailand
1998-2000 C.A.G.S. (Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics)
Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Boston University, USA
1996-2001 D.Sc.D. (Orthodontics) Boston University, USA

Professional experiences

1. Faculty of Dentistry, Prince of Songkla University

1987-1996 Lecturer
1996-2006 Assistant Professor
2006-present Associate Professor
2002-2010 Head of Department of Preventive Dentistry
2010-2011 Vice Dean for Administration

Research Interest

Biomechanics in Orthodontics

2011- 2019 Dean, Faculty of Dentistry, Prince of Songkla University

2. Thai Association of Orthodontists

2012-2014 President
2014-2016 President-Elect
2016-2018 President
2018-present Advisory board committee

3. Digital Dentistry Asssociation

2018-present President

Abstract

When Class III non-surgery is planned for the patients, upper and lower incisor positions and inclinations must be decided to indicate types of tooth movement. Subsequently, appropriate biomechanics is established. For the upper incisor, protraction and extrusion are the most often movements while retraction and intrusion are for the lower incisors. Many times, when mandibular rotations are favorable for reducing the concavity of the face, molar extrusion should be introduced. In this presentation, an innovative biomechanics system of upper incisor protraction with extrusion, lower incisor retraction with intrusion, and molar extrusion will be presented. Samples of cases will be introduced in details of clinical applications along with their biomechanics.

Clinical Practice and Support Staff (4): Teamwork and Service

13:00-14:50

Clinical Practice and Support Staff (4): Teamwork and Service

Rosemary Bray

Teamwork and Service ~ Forever The Bridge to the Technology

Rosemary Bray

Rosemary Bray, spent more than 30 years employed as a Team Member in the dental profession, both in clinical and administrative roles, working in general dentistry, periodontics and her last 17 years in Orthodontics - all in San Diego.

She left her quality, fun Orthodontic practice in 1998 to begin her self employment as a speaker and consultant in Orthodontics and Dentistry and she has now proudly celebrated her 50th anniversary in teeth! Yes, that was 50 years! This is 51!

She has lectured and worked on every continent except Antarctica (penguins must not care about teeth) and in all 50 of the United States, on behalf of the AAO & all the constituent groups , Ortho companies, numerous state and local dental societies, Ortho and dental study groups, in-office consulting and for her own workshops and seminars.

She was very honored to have been the Team Program Chair for the AAO Annual Session in Chicago in 2011 and has been an AAO speaker for now 26 consecutive years. She has spoken at many prestigious dental meetings as well, including numerous times at the Chicago Mid-Winter, Star of the North and of the South, Hinman, the ADA, the Yankee Dental, the AAPD and the CDA!

TEETH have taken her around the world to teach. She has truly "Been There and Done That" in her Orthodontic and Dental Career!

Welcome, San Diego Native .... Rosemary!

As times and technology change our Ortho profession, some things have remained constant. One of those critical aspects of a truly successful practice which will never become obsolete is the delivery of genuine, REAL customer service. Patients are savvier, more discerning and more demanding than ever before AND they have far more choices than they used to have. This level of caring SERVICE must be delivered by a well-trained and caring TEAM. These two ingredients of success, added with excellent clinical treatment, make the great practice of today and always have.
Once it was enough to get patients in the door and even keep there by delivering quality clinical care. Today, this is not sufficient. From the very first phone call to the very last retainer check appointment, it is now, not merely advised, but required of us, to Wow Them, every patient, every time. The entire TEAM must commit to providing a level of care, attentiveness and SERVICE beyond what we ever imagined or were trained to do.
Do you "Provide Patient Care" or do you "Care For Your Patient"?
Do you "Have a Job?" or are you "Passionate about Your Career?"
They are not the same. Let's discuss the difference and be once again reminded of the importance of knowing how that difference can separate the thriving practice from the struggling one.

14:00
15:00
Yoon-Ah Kook

Efficient Non-Extraction Approach to Correct Class II Malocclusion

Yoon-Ah Kook

Dr. Kook is President of Korean Association of Orthodontists, the Dean of the Graduate School of Clinical Dental Science and the professor of the Orthodontic Department at Seoul St. Mary's Hospital. Currently, he is a Clinical Professor at Department of Orthodontics, Arizona School of Dentistry & Oral Health and Saint Louis Univ.

He has published about 100 articles in international peer-reviewed journals regarding corticotomy, arch form, CBCT, and arch form. He also published several book chapters.

Diplomate, American Board of Orthodontics

Abstract

purpose C-palatal appliance(MCPA) is a highly effective device, which can be easily placed and managed by orthodontists.
Scientific evidence demonstrated that the application of MCPA resulted in successful treatment outcomes by efficient molar distalization with a near-bodily movement. According to recent clinical research, effect of maxillary arch distalization related to eruption stage of second molars was evaluated. Moreover, maxillary posterior structures after distalization were evaluated after long-term retention period.
A creative and innovative approach for Class II correction using MCPA will be discussed including biomechanics and practical guidelines. Clinical pearls and a simple management of MCPA including step-by-step placement procedures with use of a digital jig will be presented.

Junichiro Iida

Effectiveness of myofunctional therapy in orthodontic treatment and its scientific background

Junichiro Iida

Professional Experience and Education

2016-present Professor Emeritus Hokkaido University, Japan
2016-2019 Specially Appointed Professor and Chairman, Faculty of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Japan
1999-2016 Professor and Chairman, Department of Orthodontics, Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Japan
1995-1999 Associate Professor, Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan
1992-1995 Lecturer, Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan
1982-1992 Assistant Professor, Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan
1978-1982 Graduate School of Dentistry, (Ph.D. course of Orthodontics) Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan
1972-1978 School of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan

Honors and Awards

2015 Ryus Lecture Award, Korean Association of Orthodontists
1988 Hatton Award Competition, First Prize of Post-Doctoral Category, International Association for Dental Research
1978 Nagao Academic Award, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan

Research Interests

Biological background of orthodontic tooth movement
Muscular functions around the mouth
Research regarding jaw deformities
Research related cleft lip and palate patients

Abstract

Relapse of malocclusion after orthodontic treatment can be considered as the phenomenon of new malocclusion occurring after active orthodontic treatment due to failure of complete elimination of the cause of malocclusion. Force applied to teeth from the lips, tongue or cheek is thought to be one of the major factors responsible for the relapse of malocclusion. The research that we have been doing suggests that weak continuous forces applied from surrounding soft tissues to teeth possibly play the major role in changes of the position of the teeth.
From these considerations, I think it is very important to pay attention to the force that is applied to the teeth from surrounding soft tissues when deciding the treatment goal regarding the position of the teeth before the start of orthodontic treatment and also when the retention period starts.
On the other hand, myofunctional therapy is recommended for patients with abnormality in the position or in the movements of the tongue or lips, and much interest has been shown in methods used for and effects of myofunctional therapy.
We have focused on patients with lip incompetence and have carried out research on the pathophysiological conditions of patients with lip incompetence and the effectiveness of myofunctional therapy for these patients as well as research on appropriate training methods. I would like to introduce the results of our research and the scientific background of myofunctional therapy in this presentation.

Johnson Hsin-Chung Cheng

The smile esthetics of evidence-based research and clinical application

Johnson Hsin-Chung Cheng

Professor Johnson Cheng is the Immediate Past President of Taiwan Association of Orthodontists TAO (2017-2018) and the current dean and professor on College of Oral Medicine, Taipei Medical University. He has been the chairman and editor in chief of TAO Journal Committee (2013-2016). He graduated from school of dentistry, Taipei Medical University in 1983 and got Master degree and PhD from the same university in 1995 and 2008, respectively. He practiced in orthodontic department at his hospital and also engaged in teaching and research in his school of dentistry for over 25 years. His major researches were surface treatment of orthodontic TADs and high molecular orthodontic material, esthetic smile in orthodontics, efficient orthodontic treatment of anterior cross-bite, evidence based in orthodontics, etc. He has published over 300 different kinds of academic and clinical papers and been also invited to make lectures about his associated researches around the Asian countries and got an enthusiastic response.

Abstract

The clinical problems resolution and application of evidence-based information to patients have been much improved since the evidence-based medicine (EBM) developed in two decades. From the history development of EBM, the evidence-based dentistry (EBD) was severely behind than EBM. Most of dentistry remains in the "rule of thumb", representing a lack of scientific evidence, there is a great the improvement of space! For the orthodontics, the relevant discussion of EBD was emphasized only in recent years. This report will be presented first from the development and application of EBD, and then introduce the Cochrane Library website in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, consists of thousands have been systematic review evidence report on the steps to collect. My meta- analysis and clinical related researches of the smiling esthetic on orthodontic extraction will be described. I will also introduce the clinical application of my evidence-based researches and present lots of interesting clinical orthodontic cases in this report. Finally, I will take some home messages to the audiences about the clinical considerations of smiling esthetics on orthodontic extraction treatment.

Krisnawati Erry Tarman

Association between Socioeconomic Status and self perceived Orthodontic Treatment need in Adolescents ( A survey using FAS III and IOTN AC )

Krisnawati Erry Tarman

Dr. Krisnawati Erry has graduated from Faculty of Dentistry, University of Indonesia and finished her Specialist in Orthodontic from the same university. She has been a lecturer at the Department of Orthodontics, University of Indonesia since 1987. She granted as advisor of the World Implant Orthodontic Association in 2017 ; She was reelected as President of the Indonesian Association of Orthodontists for the second time. Dr. Krisnawati has published numerous peer reviewed articles and with her students win the 2nd place for case report categories award at APOC 2018 in Boracay and also at 10th WIOC 2018 in Bali- Indonesia.

Abstract

Background: According to Basic Health Research 2013, the proportion of people who had received orthodontic treatment in Indonesia is very low. One of the reasons is that people often don't realize that they need orthodontic treatment. It shows that self-perceived orthodontic treatment need has an important role. One of the factors affecting self-perceived orthodontic treatment need is socioeconomic status, but previous studies showed contradictory results. Furthermore, this research has never been conducted in Indonesia. Objective: To determine whether the socioeconomic status associated with self-perceived orthodontic treatment need in students of 27 High school Jakarta. Methods: This cross-sectional study comprised 85 students of 27 High school Jakarta aged 15 to 17 years. Family Affluence Scale III questionnaire was given to assess their socioeconomic status and Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need Aesthetic Component sheet was given to assess their self-perceived orthodontic treatment need. The chi-square test was used for data analysis. Results: The significance value is less than 0.05 (p = 0.009) which indicates that there is a statistically significant difference between socioeconomic status and self-perceived orthodontic treatment need. Conclusion: There is an association between socioeconomic status and self-perceived orthodontic treatment need in students of 27 High School Jakarta.

Noriyoshi Shimizu

Easy debonding of ceramic brackets bonded with a light-cured orthodontic adhesive containing heat-expandable microcapsules with a CO2 laser

Noriyoshi Shimizu

Professional Experience and Education

2019 Project Professor of Nihon University School of Dentistry
2016-2018 President of Japanese Orthodontic Society
2015 Research in Charge of Nihon University School of Dentistry
2014 Director of Nihon University Dental Technician School, School of Dentistry
2013 Vice Dean of Nihon University School of Dentistry
2007-2012 Director of Nihon University Dental Hospital
2003-2018 Professor and Chairman in Department of Orthodontics, Nihon University School of Dentistry
1999 Associate Professor of Nihon University School of Dentistry
1986-1988 Visiting Researcher, University of Toronto, MRC group in Periodontal Physiology
1985 Assistant Professor of Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo
1982 Graduated from Nihon University Graduate School of Dentistry

Honors and Awards

2016 Best poster presentation award, World Federation for Laser Dentistry
2013 Academic award. The Japanese Society for Jaw Deformities
2011 Excellent presentation award. The Japanese Orthodontic Society

Research Interests

Biology of periodontal tissues

Abstract

We investigated an easy debonding method for ceramic brackets using a light-cured Bis-GMA resin adhesives containing thermal expansion microcapsules and CO2 laser.
In order to debond the ceramic bracket, a heavy force must be applied physically to the bracket; this can sometimes cause fractures of the enamel and intense tooth pain. An orthodontic adhesive therefore must have contradictory properties that firmly bond the tooth and bracket during treatment but can easily separate them after treatment.
To find out the CO2 laser irradiation conditions (Operalaser PRO, YOSHIDA), the bracket surface was irradiated with the laser and the bracket base temperature and inside temperature of the pulp chamber under various conditions were evaluated using thermocouple sensor. Sixty brackets, bonded with paste and bonding agent containing microcapsule contents 0, 10, 20, 25 and 30 wt% were irradiated with CO2 laser. Shear bond strength tests were performed at 10 min after irradiation with a dental material universal testing machine.
With CO2 laser irradiation for 5s to the bracket, the bond strength in the 25% microcapsule group decreased significantly, to ~0.17 fold, compared with that of the no-laser group(P<0.05). The maximum temperature rise in the pulp chamber was 5.3°C with laser irradiation, which was less than the level that induces pulp damage.
From these results, it seems likely that the combined use of a light-cured orthodontic bonding agent containing microcapsules and a CO2 laser is a simple debonding system for ceramic brackets, with less debonding time, enamel damage, and tooth pain.

Technicians: Advancement Digital Technology

15:10-17:00

Technicians: Advancement Digital Technology

Andrea Johnson

New and emerging digital dental technologies. Patient, dental team and environmental factors

Andrea Johnson

Professional Experience and Education

2019-present Quality Improvement coach, Montagu Hospital, UK
2019-present Deputy Lead for Quality & Clinical Governance, Oral & Maxillofacial department, Montagu Hospital, UK
2019 Guest Speaker, Cardiff Metropolitan University, UK
2017-present Chair & Trustee, registered charity Den-Tech, UK
2017-present Chair, Orthodontic Technicians Association UK
2017-present Orthodontic & Maxillofacial Laboratory Manager, Montagu Hospital, UK
2017-2019 Sessional Lecturer, Nottingham College, UK
2017 Associate Lecturer Manchester Metropolitan University, UK
2017 Visiting Lecturer, University of Chester, UK
2016-2017 Council Member, Dental Technologists Association, UK
2013-2017 Vice Chair & Secretary, Orthodontic Technicians Association UK
2015-2016 STEM Healthcare Ambassador, UK
2012-2016 Newsletter Editor, Orthodontic Technicians Association UK
2012-2015 British Standards Institute Liaison, Orthodontic Technicians Association UK
2006-2017 Orthodontic Technician, Royal Derby Hospital, UK
2004-2006 Dental Technician, Greenwood & Murfin, UK

Honors and Awards

2018 1st place poster prize, Homeless & Inclusion Conference
2017 Aldridge Medal, Orthodontic Technicians Association UK
2017 Pride of Derby Award, Royal Derby Hospital
2005 Star award, Castle College, Nottingham

Research Interests

Environmental issues related to dentistry & safe disposal of digitally printed materials

Abstract

It is a very exciting time to be working in our industry, new digital technologies are revolutionising the way we work, the service we can offer our patients, the timescale for treatments and how we communicate and case conference as professionals with our fellow colleagues around the world.
The worldwide dental market place is constantly offering new digital products, materials and services and we all assume and quite often claim that digital is better, its cleaner, it's more efficient, but is it? What are we basing that claim on exactly?
What this presentation will aim to address, and question, is that very belief and assumption that digital technologies are better, better for us as professionals, better for our patients and better for businesses. How do we actually know this? How do we measure it? And what affect are the new technologies, working practices and materials having on our environment? How do we measure progress and continue to improve?

Technicians: Advancement Digital Technology

Masahiro Iijima

3D digital models generated by intraoral scanning - Is it reliable for clinical use?

Masahiro Iijima

Professional Experience and Education

2018-Present Professor and Chair, Division of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, Japan
2005-2018 Associate Professor, Division of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, Japan
2002-2005 Assistant Professor, Division of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, Japan
2000-2002 Visiting Scholar, Ohio State University
1998-2000 Instructor, Division of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, Japan
1998 PhD, Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, Japan
1993 DDS, Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, Japan

Award

2013 Best Paper Award, Japanese Society of Dental Materials and Devices
2015 Academic Award, Japanese Society of Dental Materials and Devices

Research Interests

Biomaterials

Abstract

The use of digital technology in orthodontics has been increasing in the last few decades. In particular, digital 3D model generated by intraoral scanning has been widely accepted by the field of clinical orthodontics, and is advantageous due to the compact storage space, simplified method of transferring data, potential to expand application for treatment planning, and fabrication of customized appliances. Most studies reported that intraoral scanners are highly accurate, however, the accuracy is possibly decreased as the range of the scan and the morphology. Therefore, full-arch scan with undercut areas caused by crowded teeth may influence the accuracy. The establishment of a reliable reference is also important to investigating the accuracy of digital models. For fabrication customized fixed appliances and indirect bonding trays, the digital setup models should have reliable accuracy. This presentation will review the accuracy of full-arch digital models by intraoral scanning. In addition, setup accuracy in digital models and the clinical applications will be also discussed.

Technicians: Advancement Digital Technology

Makoto Tashiro

Evolution of orthodontic treatment with optical impression and 3D technology

Makoto Tashiro

Professional Experience and Education

2020 Assistant Professor, Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Japan
2019 PhD, Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Japan

Research Interests

Optical impression
3D Technology in Orthodontics

Abstract

In recent years, digital technologies have been applied in orthodontic clinic. There are many types of intraoral scanners on the market. The performance of the intraoral scanner has been improved, and it has become possible to obtain highly accurate three-dimensional intraoral data by an optical impression. With this situation, treatment using clear aligners has also become widespread. Clear aligners orthodontic treatment has many advantages over conventional fixed appliance treatment, including aesthetic aspects, and it is clear that it will become more widely used in the future. There are also many types of simulation software for designing clear aligners. This presentation will provide the principles, accuracy and scanning time, and the workflow using some simulation software. In addition, this will suggest the possibility of future orthodontic treatment using optical impression and 3D technology.

Interdisciplinary Treatment

Mithran S Goonewardene

Interdisciplinary Management of Complex Dental Problems

Mithran S Goonewardene

Mithran Goonewardene completed Dental School at The University of Western Australia in 1981 and attended the Forsyth Dental Center/Harvard School of Dental Medicine in Boston, USA from 1984-1987 where he completed his Certificate in Orthodontics and Master of Medical Science degree. He is Head of Orthodontics and Graduate Program Director at The University of Western Australia, is a full member of The Edward Angle Society of Orthodontists and is Certified by the Australian Orthodontic Board. He visits Sri Lanka regularly as a visiting Consultant in Orthodontics in the Dental Institute, Colombo and participates in part-time private practice in Perth.

Abstract

Interdisciplinary management of complex dental problems may be extremely rewarding for both the treating clinicians and patients. A rigorous systematic approach is necessary to develop a coordinated, patient centred, goal oriented treatment plan. It is critical to establish the needs of the individual patient within their own value system and establish a realistic plan. To achieve the best outcome, clinicians must establish a group of healthcare providers who will bring the necessary skills and knowledge to the interdisciplinary team. They must meet and communicate regularly and effectively through appropriate media. A sequence of activity with specific goals should be outlined, identifying the respective clinicians and their immediate goal, which all clinicians and the patient may refer to at any stage in treatment. The team leader has the responsibility of ensuring that the patient and clinicians are all cognizant of the stage that the patient has reached and what is performed next, in turn facilitating communication. If these processes are adhered to, then the patient and the team can anticipate a mutually rewarding experience with consistently excellent reproducible outcomes. Dr Goonewardene will outline strategies for managing and complex issues related to tooth loss, tooth wear, sleep disordered breathing and complex skeletal problems from an inter-disciplinary perspective. Special emphasis on how to facilitate complex 3 dimensional tooth movements using skeletal anchors will be discussed including application in the surgery first approach.

Interdisciplinary Treatment

Ute E.M. Schneider

Complex interdisciplinary adult treatments

Ute E.M. Schneider

DDS University of Mainz, Germany
MSc in Orthodontics University of Ferrara, Italy
Since 1987 Private practice in Bolzano, Italy
Member of WFO, AAO, SIDO, ASIO, AIdOr
Active Member of the EHASO (Edward H. Angle Society of Orthodontists - Angle East),
Diplomate of the Italian Board of Orthodontists (IBO)
Since 2011 Adjunct professor at the Department of Orthodontics, University of Ferrara
2012 President AIdOr
2019/20 President Angle East
2010 Brainerd Swain Award of Excellence EHASO
Research Interests:
Very early orthodontic treatment
Treatment efficiency
Interdisciplinary treatment

Abstract

Adults patients affected by severe dentoskeletal malocclusions, multiple missing teeth, and periodontal involvement, require a well-orchestrated interdisciplinary team approach. The primary goal is to provide the restorative specialist with the best possible preconditions for the definitive prosthodontic rehabilitation.
In order to achieve an occlusally, periodontally, restoratively and economically realistic outcome, all alternative treatment options must be thoroughly evaluated and discussed with the entire team and the patient before embarking on the journey of a complex interdisciplinary treatment. Without sufficient knowledge about the latest developments in the complementary dental specialties, and consequent execution of the preestablished therapeutic protocol treatment efficiency is suboptimal. Apart from a highly skilled team of professionals. continuous patient motivation has to be assured in order to achieve the predicted outcome. An array of clinical patients will be presented to illustrate patient and team management for the complex interdisciplinary orthodontic patient.

Interdisciplinary Treatment

Birte Melsen

Regeneration of degenerated dentitions, together we can

Birte Melsen
1964 DDS. Royal Dental College Aarhus Denmark
1971 Specialized in Orthodontics.
1974 Dr. Odont. At the University of Aarhus
1975-2012 Professor and Chairman of the Department of Orthodontics at The School of Dentistry, Aarhus University, Denmark.
1986-2020 Part-time in a private practice in Lubeck, Germany, limited to adult orthodontics.
2015- Visiting Professor NYU, New York, U.S
2014- Visiting professor Hannover Germany

SELECTED AWARDS AND HONORARY DEGREES

1984 Recipient of the Robert H.W. Strang Award in Orthodontics.
1997 Recipient of the American Association of Orthodontists Foundation, PARC.
1999 World SIDO prize, Rome, Italy.
1999 Recipient of the Ernest Sheldon Friel Memorial Award.
2000 Knighthood of Dannebrog, 1st Degree.
2005 Best Paper, European Journal of Orthodontics.
2009 Invited Presenter, Northcroft Memorial Lecture.
2011 Recipient of Gloria honorary doctorate the University of Krakow Polen
2012 Recipient of the Ryus Lecture Award, Coex Seoul, Korea
2013 Recipient of the Brainerd F. Swain Award of Excellence,US.
2017 Recipient Frankel Award German Orthodontic Society Bonn Germany
2018 Recipient of the Ketcham Award in Washington by AAO.
2018 Invited presenter of the H. Margolis Lecture Tuft University Boston
2018 Honorary member of the American University Beirut Libanon.
2019 Honorary president for the first World Orthodontic Biomechanic Symposium. Doha Qatar.

Professor Melsen has authored more than 400 publications in the fields of growth based on research of human autopsy material, bone biology and clinical studies. In recent years her interests have focused on the Skeletal Anchorage, Virtual Imaging and Adult Orthodontic Treatment.

Abstract

While malocclusions can generally be treated by orthodontists alone treatment of degenerated dentitions in adult patients are requiring collaboration of several colleagues, periodontologists and prosthodontists being the most frequently involved. Important is that all aspects of the problem list and the treatment plan is taken into consideration and discussed among the involved dentists and the patient before initiating any treatment. The expectations, the resources regarding time and economy of the patient have to be clear as has the fact that maintenance of the treatment results is required after treatment. The adult patients often demand an aesthetic smile and her/his problem is often far from the main problem. The need and the demand differ.
While there is no relationship between gingivitis and periodontitis in young patients maintenance of the health of the gingiva during an orthodontic treatment of adult or even elderly patients is crucial and the risk of periodontal damage should not be underestimated.
The introduction of TADs have had a significant impact, changing the perspective of orthodontics. In relation degenerated dentitions the TADS have been important in the regeneration of lost alveolar bone.
First and foremost is that the result of an orthodontic treatment being part of a reconstruction is an occlusion that is compatible with a normal function and therefore is maintainable.

Temporary Anchorage Devices

15:25-17:10

Temporary Anchorage Devices

Mitsuru Motoyoshi

Safety placement of orthodontic anchoring screws

Mitsuru Motoyoshi

Professional Experience and Education

2018 Professor and Chair, Department of Orthodontics, Nihon University School of Dentistry, Japan
2009 Associate Professor, Department of Orthodontics, Nihon University School of Dentistry
2004 Assistant Professor, Department of Orthodontics, Nihon University School of Dentistry
1996 Visiting researcher, Alabama University in Birmingham, AL, USA
1984 DDS, Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo

Honors and Awards

Outstanding Presentation Award, Japanese Orthodontic Society, 2014, 2015, 2017.
Outstanding Presentation Award, Japan Implant Orthodontic Conference 2016.

Research Interests

Basis and Clinical Practice of Orthodontic Anchoring Screws

Abstract

Orthodontic treatment has been advanced by the use of orthodontic anchoring screws (OASs); however, OASs are occasionally loosened during treatment. We then investigated the risk factors for failure of OASs to improve the success rate, and found that the primary stability of OASs is related to the mechanical characteristics of the interface between the OASs and bone in relation to factors such as bone quality and quantity, screw design, placement torque, age, gender and placement site. In this presentation, certain and safety placement techniques for improving the success rate will be discussed in the search for the risk factors for failure.
On the other hand, physical knowledge and comprehension are required for realizing the effective tooth movement using OASs. Mechanics for effective tooth movement will be then also discussed using OASs placed into buccal alveolar bone and palate in this presentation.
Skeletal anchorage plates are used to distalize the entire dental arch. However, surgery is needed to place the anchorage plate, and this places a considerable burden on the patient. For this reason, OASs are frequently placed in the palatal bone instead of the anchorage plate. Palatal OASs are placed in the palatal alveolar bone, median palate, and so on, making it possible to avoid root contact. Also, the stiff palatal bone enables stable placement of palatal OASs. I would like to examine the effect of palatal OASs on tooth movement and the optimum placement technique in terms of safety.

Temporary Anchorage Devices

Junji Sugawara

How has skeletal anchorage changed the orthodontic strategies for Class III correction in adults?

Junji Sugawara

Professional Experience and Education

2017-2019 Director, Department of IDT, Sendai Aoba Clinic, Japan
2007-2016 Director, Department of Orthodontics, sendai Aoba Clinic, Japan
2006-2019 Visiting Clinical Professor, Department of Orthodontics, University of Connecticut, USA
1991-2006 Associate Professor, Department of Orthodontics, Tohoku University Graduate School of Dentistry, Japan
1989-1991 Instructor, Department of Orthodontics, Tohoku University Graduate School of Dentistry, Japan
1973-1998 Assistant Professor, Department of Orthodontics, Tohoku University Graduate School of Dentistry, Japan
1981 DDSc, Tohoku University, Japan

Honors and Awards

2013 The Vasavi Memorial Oration, The Indian Orthodontic Conference
2011 The Northcroft Memorial Lecture, The British Orthodontic Conference
2007 The BF and Helen E Dewel Research Award, AJO-DO
2005 The World Champion Lecturer Representing The Central and Eastern Asia, The 6th International Orthodontic Congress

Research Interests

Temporary Anchorage Devices

Abstract

The Skeletal Anchorage System (SAS) consists of titanium orthodontic anchor plates and monocortical screws that are temporarily implanted in the zygomatic buttress or the mandibular body, or in both, as absolute orthodontic anchorages. The most distinguished feature of SAS is enables us to predictably move molars. The SAS mechanics has revolutionized the concept of orthodontic and orthognathic treatment for adult patients. In this conference, I will focus on Class III patients and discuss how the strategies for Class III correction were changed following the development of SAS. Firstly, it became possible to effectively camoufalge severe Class III maloclusion in adults by distalization of the mandibular molars and/or entire dentition. Secondly, thanks to the development of SAS, it became possible to eliminate or shorten pre-surgical orthodontic treatment and significantly reduce total treatment time in Class III surgical cases. Thirdly, in moderate or severe growing Class III patients, SAS is an extremely effective biomechanics for solving various problems in the second phase treatment. Therefore, the second phase treatment for non-growing patients became more important than the first phase treatment. Thus, nowadays, the SAS becomes an indispensable modality for correction of any Class III malocclusions in my clinical practice.

The Smile

Sylvain Chamberland

Vertical Dimension and Facial Aesthetics

Sylvain Chamberland

Education

2008- M.Sc. degree, Laval University, Quebec city
1990- Certificate in Orthodontics, Montreal University, Montreal
1983- DDS degree, Laval University, Quebec city

Professional experience

1990 to date- Private practice in orthodontics, Quebec city
2009, 2014 to 2020- Guest lecturer at the AAO annual meeting
2015- Guest lecturer at Journee de l'Orthodontie Francaise, Paris
1991 to 2008- Clinical intructor and lecturer in orthodontics, DDS undergraduate program, Laval University, Quebec city
1984 to 1988- Clinical instructor in prosthodontics, DS undergraduate program, Laval University, Quebec city
1983 to 1988- Private practice in general dentistry, St-Damien, PQ.

Recognition

2017- Main speaker at the Congress of the German Orthodontic Society, Bonn, Germany
2014- The Brainerd F. Swain Award of Excellence for Best Paper presented at the annual Angle East meeting (Functional Genioplasty in Growing Patients)
2007- Member of the EHASO Eastern Component (membership process 2003 to 2006)
1997- Fellow of the Royal College of Dentist of Canada (FRCDC)
1995- Diplomate of the America Board of Orthodontics

Publication

Progressive idiopathic condylar resorption: Three case reports, AJODO 2019, 156:531-544
A la memoire de WIlliam R. Proffit, Orthod Fr, 2018, 89:323-326
Genioplastie fonctionnelle chez les patients en croissance, Ortho Fr, 2016, 87:175-188
Response to: Functional genioplasty in growing patients by Chamberland et al, 2015, 85, 6:1083
Functional genioplasty in growing patients, Angle Ortho, 2015, 85:360-373
Long-term dental and skeletal changes following SARPE, letter to the editor, OOOO 2013, 116: 120-121
Short-term and long-term stability of SARPE revisited, AJODO 2011, 139:815-822 e811.
Closer look at SARPE, JOMS 2008, 66:1895-1900

Research interest

Orthognatic surgery
TADs skeletal anchorage
TMJ arthritis, condylar resorption

Abstract

Patients with long anterior face height and anterior open bite often require a surgical approach to correct the vertical dimension. Temporary skeletal anchorage devices now offer the possibility of closing anterior open bite and reducing vertical dimension by intruding posterior teeth. Conversely, patients with reduced anterior facial height (short face syndrome) need elongation of the vertical dimension. In such case, orthognathic surgery is unavoidable if one wants to obtain normal vertical dimension. Review of the literature and case presentation will help to understand the biomechanics and treatment planning of these malocclusion.

Learning objectives

Attendees of this lecture will be able to:
1-Determine TADs placement to achieve intrusion of the buccal segment to close an open bite
2-Assess treatment goal to obtain normal vertical dimension
3-Understand mechanics to increase vertical dimension prior to orthognathic surgery for short face syndrome.

The Smile

Joseph P. Bouserhal

What about Adult Class II's: Some Thoughts...

Joseph P. Bouserhal

TITLES

  • Professor of Orthodontics and Research Lab Director, Saint Joseph University of Beirut, Lebanon
  • Adjunct Clinical Professor, Boston University, USA
  • Member, Angle Society of Orthodontists, East Component, USA
  • Member, Tweed Foundation for Orthodontic Education and Research, USA
  • Executive Committee Member, World Federation of Orthodontists

DEGREES

  • Doctor in Dental Surgery, Saint Joseph University of Beirut, Lebanon
  • Master Degree in Orthodontics, Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium
  • Doctorate Degree, University of Liege, Belgium
  • Diploma of Specialist in Lingual Orthodontics, Paris 7 University, France
  • Diploma in Dental Clinical Research, Toulouse University, France
  • Diploma in 3D Imaging, Toulouse University, France
  • Diploma in Sleep Dental Medicine, Paris 7 University, France

Abstract

Class II malocclusion is considered one of the most common problems to solve in orthodontics. Differential diagnosis constitutes the main pillar in addressing such deformations in order to be able to apply individualized therapeutic procedures.
Based on the above, each Class II has to be correctd differently and no cookbook to follow exists. A thinking classifying dento-alveolar, skeletal and soft tissue components as well as identifying maxillary from mandibular etiology has to be developed and applied.
This presentation will expose an Individualized Orthdontic Philosophy applied to Class II adult cases through differential diagnosis and individuallized treatment planning.

The Smile

Chris Chang

Gummy smile correction

Chris Chang

Dr. Chris Chang is the founder of Beethoven Orthodontic Center and Newton's A Inc. in Hsinchu, Taiwan. He received his PhD in Bone Physiology and Certificate in Orthodontics from Indiana University. He is a diplomate of the American Board of Orthodontics and an active member of Angle Society-Midwest. Dr. Chang is the publisher of Journal of Digital Orthodontics and has authored and co-authored many orthodontic books, including Orthodontics Vols. 1-6, as well as Words of Wisdom, Jobsology and Trumpology. He is the inventor of OrthoBoneScrews(OBS).

Abstract

Maxillary whole arch intrusion and retraction by Temporary Anchorage Devices (TADs) has been proved to be an effective way to improve the esthetics of gummy smile. This lecture will present the diagnosis and treatment planning of gummy smile. Detailed mechanics and screw insertion techniques will be introduced. The rationales for surgical crown lengthening to enhance the anterior esthetics will also be discussed.

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