Program Information

Congress Schedule

  National
Convention Hall
CONFERENCE CENTER
Main Hall 301+302 501+502
8:00

Patient’s Expectations and Treatment

8:00-9:10

Patient’s Expectations and Treatment

Steven J Lindauer

Patient Expectations and the Future of Orthodontics

Steven J Lindauer

Professional Experience and Education

2012-Present Editor, The Angle Orthodontist
2000-Present Professor and Chair, Department of Orthodontics, Virginia Commonwealth University
1989-2000 Professor, Associate Professor, Assistant Professor, Department of Orthodontics, Virginia Commonwealth University
1986-1989 MDentSci, Cert Orthodontic Postgraduate Program, School of Dental Medicine, University of Connecticut
1982-1986 DMD, School of Dental Medicine, University of Connecticut
1978-1982 BA, University of Pennsylvania

Honors and Awards

2017 Inducted into The International College of Dentists
2009 Inducted into The American College of Dentists

Research Interests

Orthodontic Clinical Outcomes
Orthodontic Biomechanics

Abstract

The specialty of orthodontics is undergoing rapid transformation and the pace of change has left many orthodontists feeling uncertain and perhaps even afraid of what the future will hold. While scientific research and appliance innovations allow achievement of increasingly dramatic and precise dental movements, patients often request faster and more convenient treatment options that lead to compromised outcomes. Technological advancement, economic pressure, increased competition, and shifts in marketing make it difficult to predict where we are going. It is clearly established that most patients seek orthodontic treatment because they want their teeth and their smile to look better. Is it appropriate to set goals for orthodontic treatment if there are no confirmed detrimental effects caused by not meeting them? What do our patients expect from the orthodontic treatment they voluntarily seek, and how willing are they to accept compromises? The answers to these questions may shape the future of orthodontics as we adapt to a changing environment.

Patient’s Expectations and Treatment

Susan J Cunningham

Great Expectations - understanding patient expectations in orthodontics

Susan J Cunningham

Professional experience and education

2010 to date Professor/ Honorary Consultant, UCL Eastman Dental Institute
2007 to date Programme Director, Postgraduate Orthodontic programme, UCL Eastman Dental Institute
2001-2010 Senior Lecturer/ Honorary Consultant, UCL Eastman Dental Institute
1995-2001 Lecturer, Eastman Dental Institute, London
1992-1995 Postgraduate/ Registrar, Eastman Dental Institute, London
2000 PhD University College London
1988 BChD Leeds University

Honors and Awards

2020 to date Director of Research, British Orthodontic Society
2013-2017 Director of Education, British Orthodontic Society
2009-2020 Honorary Secretary, European Orthodontic Society

Research interests

Outcomes of orthodontic and orthognathic treatment
Psychological aspects of dentofacial concerns

Abstract

Understanding and managing patient expectations are fundamental aspects of any healthcare intervention, but are particularly important in elective treatments such as orthodontics.

This presentation will consider the importance of having a comprehensive understanding of patient expectations with respect to both the process and outcomes of orthodontic treatment, reflecting also on the relationship between expectations and patient satisfaction. The management of realistic and unrealistic expectations will be discussed, highlighting the importance of good communication if this is to be successful.

Craniofacial Growth

8:00-9:10

Craniofacial Growth

Ichiro Takahashi

Mechanical stress response of chondrocytes during early development of cartilage

Ichiro Takahashi

Professional Experience and Education

2009-present Professor and Chair, Section of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
Kyushu University Faculty of Dental Science
2011-2019 Vice-dean, Kyushu University Faculty of Dental Science,
2007-2009 Associate Professor, Division of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Graduate School of Dentistry, Tohoku University
2003-2007 Assistant Professor, Division of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Graduate School of Dentistry, Tohoku University
1998-2003 Research Associate, Division of Orthodontics, Graduate School of Dentistry, Tohoku University
1996-1998 Visiting Research Fellow, Craniofacial Development Section, NIAMS/NIH
1992-1996 Research Associate, Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Tohoku University
1988-1992 PhD, Graduate School of Dentistry, Tohoku University
1982-1988 DDS, School of Dentistry, Tohoku University

Research Interests

  • Temporomandibular joint morphogenesis
  • Mechanical stress responses of cartilages and chondrocytes
  • Tooth movement and periodontal ligament
  • Craniofacial developmental biology
  • Biomaterials in bone tissue
  • Education in Orthodontics.

Abstract

Scientific background of orthodontic-orthopedic treatment for skeletal malocclusion during growing period is one of the important issues to be addressed. Mandibular condylar cartilage (MCC) is the major growing cite of mandible by endochondral bone formation. We have been performing series of experiments to analyze the cellular response of differentiating chondrocyte to compressive and tensional stress loading. In the first experiment, electrical stimulation of lateral pterygoid muscle inhibited the chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal cells in the posterior area of MCC in growing rats. Since distribution of mechanicals stress in temporomandibular joints was unclear, we employed midpalatal suture cartilage (MSC) in growing rats to verify the hypothesis that compression enhances chondrogenesis and tension inhibits chondrogenic differentiation in the MSC. As the result, hypertrophy of chondrocytes was enhanced in the MSC compressed by orthopedic force, while the cartilage was replaced by bone under expansive force. Further, integrins are found to be expressed in the MSC and Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK) was activated by expansive force. To analyze the cellular mechanisms of mechano-response of differentiating chondrocytes, embryonic limb bud cells were mechanically stimulated in vitro. When mouse limb bud cells were compressed in collagen gel 3-D culture, differentiation of chondrocytes was accelerated with enhanced expression of Sox9, the transcriptional activator for cartilage specific collagen, Col2a1. On the other hand, expansive stress inhibited the chondrogenic differentiation of rat limb bud cells in stretched micromass culture through integrin mediated ERK signaling pathway. Thus, different types of mechanical stress would differentially regulate the differentiation of chondrocytes.

Craniofacial Growth

Laura R Iwasaki

Mechanobehavior to predict temporomandibular joint growth and degeneration

Laura R Iwasaki

Professional Experience and Education

2018-Present Chair and Professor (Provisional), Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU), USA
2007-2018 Leo A. Rogers Chair and Associate Professor, Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics; Associate Professor, Oral and Craniofacial Sciences (joint appointment); School of Dentistry; Graduate Faculty, School of Graduate Studies; University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC), USA
2006-Present Research Assistant Professor (2006-2019), Research Associate Professor (2019-Present), Oral Diagnostic Sciences (volunteer appointment), School of Dental Medicine, University at Buffalo, USA
1996-2006 Assistant Professor, Growth & Development, College of Dentistry, University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC), USA
1999-2006 Graduate Faculty, Graduate College, University of Nebraska, USA
1992-1996 Assistant Professor, Preventive Dental Science, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Manitoba, Canada
1992 PhD (Interdisciplinary Studies), Faculty of Graduate Studies, University of Manitoba, Canada
1987 MSc (Preventive Dental Science) and Orthodontic Certification, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Manitoba, Canada
1983-1984 Residency (General Dentistry), Vancouver General Hospital/University of British Columbia, Canada
1983 DDS, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Alberta, Canada
1981 BSc (Dental Sciences), Faculty of Science, University of Alberta, Canada

Honors and Awards

2019 Eugene and Pauline Blair Distinguished Service Award, American Association of Orthodontists Foundation (AAOF)
2018 GAC International Corporate Center Award, AAOF
2007 American Association of Orthodontists Orthodontic Faculty Development Award
2005 3M Unitek Corporate Center Award, AAOF
2000 BF Dewel Memorial Biomedical Research Award, AAOF

Research Interests

Biomechanics and behaviors of the human craniomandibular complex with special interests in the TMJ, jaw muscles, and tooth movement.

Abstract

Mechanical loading is important to the growth and maintenance of the secondary cartilages of the condyle and eminence of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The fibrocartilage disc between the condyle and eminence distributes loads, provides lubrication and, because it is avascular, depends on mechanical loading for nutrient exchange. Hence, therapies to modify jaw growth and prevent or ameliorate degenerative joint disease could be improved by understanding the mechanical loading conditions within the TMJ. Studies in humans where the magnitude and frequency of TMJ loading were measured to distinguish dentofacial phenotypes and predict longitudinal TMJ change will be highlighted. Key measurements of mechanical loading conditions are the concentration of work input to articulating tissues during jaw use, known as energy density, and the percentage of time that muscles are used to load the jaws out of a total recording time, known as duty factor. These measurements, combined into a mechanobehavioral score (MBS = (TMJ energy densities)2 X jaw muscle duty factors), are being applied to understand better the mechanisms involved with condylar growth and the susceptibility of the TMJ to degenerative changes. This presentation will describe how clinical treatment records and data collected via validated techniques, including numerical modeling, dynamic stereometry, and laboratory and in-field electromyography are employed to determine mechanobehavioral score. Future clinical approaches that could modify mechanobehavior to achieve more successful and predictable orthopedic therapies in children with jaw discrepancies and measures to prevent degenerative changes in the TMJ will be discussed.

International Board Symposium

8:00-8:10

Opening Remarks

Nikhilesh R Vaid
Nikhilesh R Vaid

Prof Nikhilesh R. Vaid is currently the PRESIDENT -ELECT of the World Federation of Orthodontists. He is a Past President of the Asian Pacific Orthodontic Society & the Indian Orthodontic Society. Prof Vaid is Editor in Chief of APOS Trends in Orthodontics -the Journal of the Asian Pacific Orthodontic Society and three issues of Seminars in Orthodontics, including one on "Digital Technologies in Orthodontics"
He has a practice in Mumbai, India and Dubai ,UAE. He is the VICE DEAN and Professor of Orthodontics at the European University, Dubai Health Care City, DUBAI,UAE.

Clear Aligners

8:00-9:10

Clear Aligners

Zhihe Zhao

The defects, risks and countermeasures of Clear Aligner

Zhihe Zhao

Professional Experience and Education

2001-2019 Professor, West China School of Stomatology, Sichuan University, China
1998-1999 Advanced Diploma in Orthodontics, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
1994-2001 Associate Professor, School of Stomatology, West China University of Medical Sciences, China
1992-1994 Senior Lecture, School of Stomatology, West China University of Medical Sciences, China
1987-1992 Ph.D, School of Stomatology, West China University of Medical Sciences, China
1981-1987 BDS, School of Stomatology, West China University of Medical Sciences, China

Honors and Awards

2016 The First Prize of the Sichuan Province Science and Technology Progress Award
2009 The First Prize of the Education Ministry Science and Technology Progress Award
2003 The Second Prize of the Education Ministry Science and Technology Progress Award

Research Interests

Biomechanics in Orthodontics

Abstract

In recent years, clear aligner has become more and more popular. However, the clear aligner has its own defects, such as material defect, efficacy defect and mechanic defect. In addition, there are still some risks , which are mainly manifested in the risks of high initial stress, IPR risks, periodontal risks of opening deep bite, retracting anterior teeth and distalizing the molars. These defects and risks lead to more problems in clinic, therefore, the author proposes a programmed solution from the anchorage, overbite, torque controls and attachment design aspects including the design, auditing, and monitoring of using clear aligner.

International Board Symposium

8:10-8:30

[Part 1] WFO Initiates for Orthodontic Boards: A 10 Year Perspective

Roberto Justus

WFO Orthodontic Boards Committee, a ten year perspective

Roberto Justus

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE AND EDUCATION

2014 to 2019 Adjunct Professor, AT Still Univ., Graduate Dept. of Orthodontics, Phoenix, AZ, USA
2010 to 2015 WFO President
2007 to 2010 Chair, WFO Orthodontic Boards Committee
2005 Examiner, Italian Board of Orthodontics
2003 to 2004 President, ABO College of Diplomates
2002 to 2019 Examiner, ABO
1996 to 2019 AJODO (reviewer)
1995 to 1998 President Latin American Assoc. of Orthodontists
1994 to 2019 Editorial Board Member: "Seminars in Orthodontics" and "Revista Clinica de Ortodontia" (Dental Press, Brazil)
1990 Diplomate ABO
1988 to 2019 Research Director, Graduate Dept. of Orthodontics, Intercontinental Univ., MEXICO
1970 to 2019 Professor orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Technological Univ. of Mexico, MEXICO
1969 to 1970 Professor graduate orthodontics, Dept. of Orthodontics, UNAM, MEXICO
1968 MSD, Dept. of Orthodontics, Univ. of Wash., Seattle, USA

AWARDS

2018 "Honorary Member Award", British Orthodontic Society
2013 "Louise Ada Jarabak Award", American Assoc. of Orthodontists Foundation
2011 "Dale B. Wade Award", ABO
2007 "Dentistry Distinguished Professor Award", Universidad Tecnologica de Mexico
2002 "National Orthodontic Excellence Award", Mexican Association of Orthodontists
1993 "Best Lecturer 1993 Meeting Award", Latin American Association of Orthodontists, Lima, Peru
1966 "Best Dental Student in Mexico Award", Diario de Mexico newspaper

HONORS

2018 WFO Executive Committee honored me for "Promoting the establishment of Orthodontic Certifying Boards around the world"
2015 Springer Publishing Co. honored me for authoring the orthodontic textbook: "Iatrogenic Effects of Orthodontic Treatment, Decision Making in Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment"
2012 Univ. of Wash honored me as "2012 Kokich Shapiro Visiting Scholar"
2010 Seminars in Orthodontics honored me as "Guest Editor" March 2010 issue
2010 Mexican Association of Orthodontists honored me naming its 2010 meeting as the "Roberto Justus 43rd Annual Meeting"
2006 Intercontinental Univ., Graduate Dept of Orthodontics, honored me for "Excellence as Professor and Research Director"

RESEARCH INTERESTS

Clinical orthodontics

[Part 1] WFO Initiates for Orthodontic Boards: A 10 Year Perspective

David L.Turpin

Changing Modes of Decision-making

David L.Turpin

[Part 2] American Board of Orthodontics

Valmy Kulbersh

The American Board of Orthodontics: A Historical Perspective

Dr. Valmy Kulbersh

Education

1973 Doctor in Dental Surgery (DDS)
National University of Asuncion, Dental School. Asuncion, Paraguay
1977 Orthodontic Certificate and M.S
University of Detroit Dental School. Detroit, MI

Professional Experience - Academic Appointments

1977-1984 Assistant Professor, Department of Orthodontics, University of Detroit, School of Dentistry, Detroit, MI
1977-2004 Clinic Coordinator, Graduate Orthodontic Program, University of Detroit Mercy, School of Dentistry, Detroit, MI
1984-1999 Associate Professor, Department of Orthodontics, University of Detroit Mercy, School of Dentistry, Detroit, MI
1999-2001 Full Professor, Department of Orthodontics, University of Detroit Mercy, School of Dentistry, Detroit, MI
2002-present Adjunct Professor, Department of Orthodontics, University of Detroit Mercy, School of Dentistry, Detroit, MI

Professional Experience – Non academic:

1977-present Intramural Practice - University of Detroit Mercy, School of Dentistry
1980-present Private practice - Sterling Heights, MI
2013-present Great lakes Association of Orthodontics - Director and President of the American Board of Orthodontics

Hospital Appointments:

1994-2016 Staff, DMC Hospital - Oral Surgery Dept., Cleft Lip & Palate Clinic

Honors and Awards:

1974 Best Student Award, National University of Asuncion, Paraguay. School of Dentistry
1975 Student Award, Full Academic Scholarship. International Rotary Club International Foundation
1983 G.L.A.O. Academic Institution Award, Table Clinic Presentation, Ottawa, Canada
1988 ABO Case Display at Annual Meeting of the American Association of Orthodontics, Anaheim, CA
1990 Omicron Kappa Upsilon Honorary Dental Society
1991 Fellow of the American College of Dentists
1993 Fellow of the Pierre Fauchard Academy
2000 Elected to the Angle Society of Orthodontists, Midwest Component
2006 Fellow of the International College of Dentists
2011 G.L.A.O Distinguished Service Award

Research interests

Early treatment
Orthognathic surgery
Airway considerations

[Part 2] American Board of Orthodontics

David Sabott

Past and Present ABO Certification: Structure and Process

David Sabott

Professional Experience and Education

1977-present Private Practice, Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Erie, CO. USA
2014-2020 Director, American Board of Orthodontics, St. Louis, MO. USA.
2018-2021 Invited lecturer, University of Colorado, Denver, CO. USA.
2018-2019 Invited lecturer, Roseman University, Henderson, NV. USA.
2018-2020 Invited lecturer, A.T. Still University, Mesa, AZ. USA.
1977-1980 Clinical Instructor, Department of Developmental Dentistry, University of Colorado School of Dentistry, Denver, CO. USA.
1977 Certificate in Orthodontics, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL. USA
1976-1977 Clinical Instructor, Pediatric Dentistry, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA
1973-1975 Pediatric Dental Resident, Children’s Memorial Hospital / Northwestern University, Chicago, IL. USA.
1975 Master of Science (M.S. degree), Biological Materials, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL. USA.
1971-1973 Dental Extern, Children’s Hospital, Methodist Hospital Health Care System, Omaha, NB. USA.
1969-1973 Doctor of Dental Surgery, (D.D.S. degree), Creighton University Dental School, Omaha, NB. USA.
1966-1969 Creighton University, Omaha, NB. USA.

Honors and Awards

2009 Rocky Mountain Society of Orthodontics, Distinguished Service Award.
2005 Rocky Mountain Society of Orthodontists, President.
2002 Edward H. Angle Society, President of the Southwest Component.
2000 Colorado State Orthodontic Society, President.
1977 Omicron Kappa Upsilon - National Honorary Dental Fraternity
1977 American Society of Dentistry for Children - Certificate of Merit

Research Interests

Early (mixed dentition) treatment,
Facial esthetics
Sleep Apnea

[Part 2] American Board of Orthodontics

Patrick Foley

Why the Exam Has Been Changed

Patrick Foley

Education

Northern Illinois University
DeKalb, IL
1969-73   B. S. Ed.
University of Illinois, College of Dentistry
Chicago, IL
1976-80   D.D.S.
U.S. Army, General Practice Residency
Fort Gordon, GA
1980-81
Saint Louis University, Department of Orthodontics
St. Louis, MO
1985-87   M.S.D.

Experience

Teacher, Mathematics and Science
   Oswego Senior High School
   Oswego, IL
1974-76
General Dentist
   U.S. Army Dental Corps
   Butzbach, Federal Republic of Germany
1981-85
Private Practice-Limited to Orthodontics
   Lake Zurich, IL
1987-2017
Assistant Clinical Professor in Orthodontics, Saint Louis University
   Center for Advanced Dental Education,
   St. Louis, MO
2001-2017
Associate Professor in Orthodontics, Associate Director,
   Center for Advanced Dental Education,
   Saint Louis University
   St. Louis, MO
2018-Present

Awards

Omicron Delta Kappa National Honor Society 1972
Psi Omega Scholastic Achievement Award 1980
Fellowship, Academy of General Dentistry 1986
Certification, American Board of Orthodontics 1995
Re-certification, American Board of Orthodontics 2006

Publications, Presentations, Patents

A Study of the Position of the Parotid Papilla Relative to the Occlusal Plane, Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, January, 1985
Table Clinic, 1983 USAREUR Dental Meeting, “A Review of the Maxillary Labial Frenectomy Procedure”
Table Clinic, 1984 USAREUR Dental Meeting, “The Versatile Parotid Papilla --A Study of the Position of the Parotid Papilla Relative to the Occlusal Plane”
“A Survey of Orthodontic Treatment Performed by Dental Practitioners Who Are Not Specialists in Orthodontics”, Master’s Thesis, Saint Louis University, 1988
Doctor’s Roundtable Discussion, “Office Design: You Don’t Need to Re-Invent the Wheel”, 99th Annual AAO Meeting, San Diego, May 17, 1999
Doctor’s Roundtable Discussion, “Office Design: You Don’t Need to Re-Invent the Wheel”, 100th Annual AAO Meeting, Chicago, May 1, 2000
U.S. Patent, #5,779,654: Clean Breath Wand
U.S. Patent, #5,944,531: An Oral Hygiene Instructional Display

Professional Affiliations

Illinois Society of Orthodontists, President in 2014-2015
Midwestern Society of Orthodontists
American Association of Orthodontists
World Federation of Orthodontists
Trustee, University of Illinois Alumni Board, 2006-2009
Secretary, Northwest Interdisciplinary Dentofacial Study Group, 2002-2009
Chicago Dental Society
Illinois State Dental Society
American Dental Association
American Board of Orthodontics
   Guest Examiner, 2007-2015
   Director (Representing the Midwestern Society of Orthodontists) 2015-Present
College of Diplomates of the American Board of Orthodontics
International College of Dentists, 2015-2018

Research Interests

2D and 3D Cephalometrics and Superimposition
Bolton Discrepancy Studies
Applications of Digital Technology in Orthodontics

[Part 2] American Board of Orthodontics

Timothy Trulove

Experience with and Results of the Scenario Based Oral Clinical Examination

Timothy Scott Trulove, D.M.D., M.S.

Education

1980-83 The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama
1983-87 The University of Alabama School of Dentistry, Birmingham, Alabama
1987-89 The University of Iowa College of Dentistry, Iowa City, IA
1996 Board Certified by the American Board of Orthodontics

Professional Experience

1989-Present Private Practice
4164 Carmichael Road
Montgomery, AL 36106
2000-present Children's Rehabilitative Services for Alabama/Cleft Palate Clinic Staff Orthodontist
2006 Instructor, Charles H. Tweed Foundation
2016-present American Board of Orthodontics
Director

Academic Appointments

1998-present Adjunct Professor of Orthodontics
The University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Dentistry

Honors and Awards

1987 Omicron Kappa Upsilon Honor Society
The University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Dentistry
1987 The Alabama Dental Association Student Leadership Award
The University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Dentistry
1987 Recipient of the Dean's Medal
The University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Dentistry

Research Interests

Clinical Orthodontics evaluating the effects and outcomes of treatment modalities

9:00

Periodontal Considerations

9:45-11:30

Periodontal Considerations

Chun-Hsi Chung

Periodontal Considerations in Orthodontic Treatment

Chun-Hsi Chung

Professional Experience and Education

2011-present Chairman, Department of Orthodontics, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, USA
2003-present Associate Professor, Department of Orthodontics, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, USA
2017-present Postdoctoral Program Director, Department of Orthodontics, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, USA
2017-2018 President, The American Board of Orthodontics
2010-2018 Director, The American Board of Orthodontics
2010-2015 Postdoctoral Program Director, Department of Orthodontics, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, USA
1996-2003 Assistant Professor, Department of Orthodontics, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, USA
1992-2007 Clinical Director, Department of Orthodontics, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine
1992-1996 Lecturer, Department of Orthodontics, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, USA
1992 Orthodontic Certificate, Department of Orthodontics, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, USA
1992 MS, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, USA
1986 DMD, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, USA

Honors and Awards

2018 The American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) Award- 2018 AAO Annual Session Doctors Program Co-chair
2006 The Orthodontic Faculty Development Fellowship Award- The American Association of Orthodontists Foundation
2000 The Orthodontic Faculty Development Fellowship Award- The American Association of Orthodontists Foundation
1997 The University of Pennsylvania Research Foundation Award
1991 The Research Award, Department of Orthodontics, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, USA

Research Interests

Craniofacial Growth and Development
Rapid Palatal Expansion
Adult Orthodontics
3D Imaging in Orthodontics

Abstract

Although periodontal implications of orthodontic treatment are well-understood, undesired consequences such as gingival recession, bone dehiscence, and fenestration are still commonly observed. Literature shows that there are anatomic and periodontal boundaries that limit the amount of acceptable tooth movement. In planning orthodontic treatment, it is important to consider periodontal susceptibility, gingival phenotype and morphology of alveolar bone. CBCT imaging is very useful in diagnosing maxillary and mandibular transverse skeletal dimensions, thickness of buccal or lingual bone, and buccolingual inclination of each tooth. Nowadays non-extraction modality has become popular in the treatment of crowded dentition with either traditional bracket systems or clear aligners. However, significant dental arch expansion and incisal proclination often take place, which may result in gingival recession and/or bone dehiscence. Extraction therapy sometimes is necessary to reposition the teeth in the center of the alveolar bone so the periodontal condition can be improved. For certain patients, soft tissue grafting and/or corticotomy in conjunction with bone grafting would be needed. To avoid excessive dental expansion, rapid palatal expansion with TADs can be attempted on young adults to treat narrow maxilla. However, for older adults surgically-assisted rapid palatal expansion or Le Fort 1 osteotomy would be required. In this presentation, the periodontics-orthodontics interdisciplinary treatment approach to maintain the periodontal integrity, minimize future periodontal concerns, and allow efficient orthodontic treatment will be delineated.

Accelerated Tooth Movement

9:45-11:30

Accelerated Tooth Movement

Fang Bing

Class II correction with the use of TADS

Fang Bing

In the correction of convex deformity, it is often accompanied by high angle, opening and closing, bimaxillary protrusion and so on, which are all challenging malocclusion and difficult to treat. This topic is about the joint application of implant anchorage and orthodontics device to release the appropriate mechanics, so as to achieve the effective correction of these patients and achieve the goal of functional and aesthetic balance and health.

Abstract

Class II correction with the use of TADS

Accelerated Tooth Movement

M. Ali Darendeliler

How can we accelerate tooth movement? Do we need external Aids ?

M. Ali Darendeliler

Dr Darendeliler is Professor and Chair of Orthodontic, Discipline of Orthodontics, at the University of Sydney and Head of Department, Orthodontics, Sydney Dental Hospital, Sydney South West Area Health Service. He received his dentistry training from the University of Istanbul and his PhD from the University of Gazi, in Turkey and his first specialist training in orthodontics from the University of Geneva, Switzerland and his second specialist training from the High Education Council, Turkey. During the course of his career he has undertaken duties as a clinical instructor, research and postgraduate coordinator (Maitre d'Assisstant et de Recherche) at the University of Geneva, Assistant Professor at the University of North Carolina, Research Professor at the University of Southern California. Dr Darendeliler has been recognized for his efforts with multiple prizes including the Sheldon Friel Award, the highest recognition from the European Orthodontic Society, the Begg Award, the highest research award from the Australian Society of Orthodontists, and the Huston award for best research from the European Orthodontic Society. His research interests include orthodontic tooth movement, root resorption, obstructive sleep apnoea, temporary anchorage devices, sequential aligners, self-ligating brackets, orthopaedic treatment modalities, accelerated tooth movement, magnetic fields and forces and dentofacial orthopedics. He lectured in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia. In addition to his research and teaching commitments he also maintains a private specialist orthodontic practice.

Abstract

Clinicians have been looking at the ways of accelerating tooth movement for several reasons: Patient's demand due to increase in number of adult patients, to avoid problems related to treatment duration such as demineralization, periodontal issues and root resorption, to increase the productivity, profitability and efficiency, to have better anchorage control and to differentiate themselves from other practitioners. Several methods were used to accelerate tooth movement however the benefits of the methods used have to be looked at in terms of side effects and clinical significance. The only way to accelerate the orthodontic tooth movement is to accelerate bone resorption via biological response from the periodontal ligament as a result of mechanical loading. In fact the question to be asked is: Accelerated bone resorption; What is the evidence? Several methods, drugs and external stimuli were tested over the years and most of these were promoted by companies usually with little or no evidence. The lecture will address all available methods used to accelerate orthodontic tooth movement and will discuss their validity based on evidence.

Accelerated Tooth Movement

Martyn T Cobourne

Adjuncts to orthodontic tooth movement. Are they really worth the bother?

Martyn T Cobourne

Martyn Cobourne is Professor and Head of Orthodontics at Kings College London and Honorary Consultant in Orthodontics at Guys and St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust. His research is primarily focused on investigating the role of molecular signaling pathways during early craniofacial development. However, he is also interested in the effectiveness of contemporary orthodontic treatment and has led a number of multi-centre clinical trials investigating treatment efficiency. His clinical research won the B. F. and Helen E. Dewel Award of the American Association of Orthodontists in 2019. He has published over 145 peer-reviewed articles and is the author of two successful orthodontic textbooks. He was Director of Research at the British Orthodontic Society between 2012 and 2016 and is currently Editor in Chief of the Journal of Orthodontics. He is an elected member of the Board of Faculty of Dental Surgery at the Royal College of Surgeons of England and a full member of the North Atlantic Division of the USA Angle Society.

Abstract

A key goal for all orthodontists is the minimisation of treatment duration whilst maintaining excellence of treatment outcome. In recent years, a number of techniques have been popularised that aim to reduce orthodontic treatment time by speeding up rates of tooth movement. These include the use of different bracket designs and archwire sequences, customised appliances, vibrational force application, photobiomodulation and surgical-assisted orthodontics. This lecture will review the scientific basis of these different techniques and focus on the clinical evidence base for their efficiency. The relevance of these findings will be discussed in relation to current clinical practice.

Bone Biology

Carlalberta Verna

The Influence of Bone Density on Tooth Movement Biomechanics

Carlalberta Verna

Professional experience and education

1989 DDS, Faculty of Medicine , School of Dentistry, University of Ferrara, Italy
1993-1996 PhD in preventive orthodontics, department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Florence, Italy
1996-1999 PhD in Odontology, Section of Orthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Aarhus, Denmark
1999-2002 Post-graduate degree in Orthodontics, Section of Orthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Aarhus, Denmark
2002-2012 Associate Professor, Section of Orthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Aarhus, Denmark
January 2013 - Professor and Head Clinic for Pediatric Oral Health and Orthodontics, University Center for Dental Medicine, UZB, University of Basel, Switzerland

Honors and Awards

Alice L. Jee Memorial Award for junior investigators. International Sun Valley Workshop on Hard Tissues, Sun Valley, Idaho, USA, 1998
W.H.B. Houston research award European Orthodontic Society, 1999
W.J.B. Houston scholarship from the European Orthodontic Society 2000-2003 Beni Solow award European Journal of Orthodontics 2004
Italian Orthodontic Society for the best scientific paper in 2006
Houston award for the best poster presentation European Orthodontic Society, 2006
Beni Solow award European Journal of Orthodontics 2009

Research interests

Biology of tooth movement, biomechanics, craniofacial anomalies

Abstract

The achievement of a planned tooth movement is the result of the interaction between variables related to the orthodontist and variables related to the patient. The orthodontist plans the individual biomechanical system in relation to the centre of resistance of one tooth or groups of teeth. It is known that the location of the centre of resistance varies according to the patients' anatomical characteristics; the anatomy of the supporting tissues and the shape of the roots. The quality of the supporting tissues in terms of bone density has seldomly been taken into consideration as potential variable that could influence the location of the centre of resistance. Surgically facilitated orthodontic tooth movement is one of the various attempts of orthodontists to influence patients' response to enhance tooth movement rate. The principle is based on the local acceleration of bone remodelling activities occurring in bone repair processes, where bone density is initially decreased. Accelerated bone turnover in animal models has shown to increase tooth movement rate and the application of a single force induces a controlled rather than an uncontrolled tipping, as would under normal bone turnover conditions. A Finite Element analysis of tooth movement after corticotomy revealed that translation in corticotomized teeth occurs at a larger M/F ratio compared to normal bone turnover. In order to achieve this, a bigger moment needs to be inserted into the wire.

Bone Biology

Hiroshi Kamioka

Bioimaging of Bone

Hiroshi Kamioka

Professional Experience and Education

2015-present Director in Okayama University Hospital Advanced Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate Treatment Center.
2014-present Professor and Chair in Dept. of Orthodontics, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University.
2005-2014 Associate Professor in Dept. of Orthodontics, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University.
1999-2005 Lecturer in Dept. of Orthodontics, Okayama University Hospital
1995-1998 Post-doctoral fellow in Dept. of Anatomy, Indiana University Medical School, USA
1993-1999 Assistant Professor in Dept. of Orthodontics, Tokushima University Dental School

Honors and Awards

2009 Microscopy and Microanalysis best biological paper award for 2008, Microscopy Society of America
2003 Best poster award in 21st Japan Bone and Mineral Metabolism Meeting
2000 Excellent presentation award in 59th Japan Orthodontic Meeting

Research Interests

Biological analysis of tooth movement

Abstract

In a variety of scientific fields, it is a worthwhile topic to visualize natural phenomenon. Newly developed visualizing method often leads breakthrough in the scientific fields. Especially, in the biological field, it is significant to reveal temporal-spatial response happened in the cells with visualizing molecular level phenomenon. Such visualization could provide information to understand cellular behavior to their extracellular stimulus in vivo and in vitro. Although osteocytes are the most abundant cells in bone, it has been difficult to study their biological feature because they are embedded in hard bone tissue. So, even the real 3D structure of the osteocyte was not uncovered till lately. As it is already known orthodontic tooth movement requires dramatic bone changes. Osteocytes are thought to be primary mechanosensory cells. In this presentation, we will introduce our application of confocal laser scanning microscopy, ultra-high voltage electron microscopy and focused ion beam scanning electric microscopy to reveal the bone microstructure and discuss the mechanosensitivity of the cells in bone.

Bone Biology

Sarandeep Huja

Need for Speed, An orthodontic imperative?

Sarandeep Huja

Dr. Sarandeep S. Huja, DDS, PhD currently serves as the Dean, of the James B. Edwards College of Dental Medicine and Professor, Department of Orthodontics Medical University of South Carolina

Dr. Huja initially received his dental (1987) and orthodontic (1992) training from the Government Dental College and Hospital, Bombay. From 1993-2001, he was associated with three US institutions, receiving his MS (1995) from Marquette University, Milwaukee, his PhD (1999) and Orthodontic Certificate (1999) from Indiana University, Indianapolis and his DDS (2001) from University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Dentistry, Lincoln. His PhD was conducted under the mentorship of Dr. David Burr from the Department of Anatomy and Dr. W. Eugene Roberts in Orthodontics from Indiana University. From 2001-2011, he was a faculty at the Ohio State University working under the mentorship of Dr. Katherine Vig, a world renowned orthodontist and educator. In 2011 he moved the University of Kentucky as Division Chief of Orthodontics. In 2016 he was appointed the Program Director of Orthodontics and Associate Dean for Faculty and Student Development and Graduate Studies at the University of Kentucky.
He has served as advisor for both PhD and Masters graduate students and has taught Orthodontics and Bone Biology to dental and graduate students. He has the Principle Investigator on grants from the NIDCR, NIH, Corporate and Foundations. His research seeks to understand bone remodeling, osteoclast biology and adaptation to physical forces. His students have been recognized with national awards on projects related to tooth movement and implant adaptation biology. Dr. Huja is also the recipient of the prestigious B.F. Dewel Memorial Biomedical Research Award, from the American Association of Orthodontists Foundation.
Dr. Huja is a member of the Midwest component of the E.H. Angle Society and is a Diplomate of the American Board of Orthodontics, and he also maintains an intramural faculty practice.
He is widely published in the field of Bone Biology and Orthodontics and is a frequent speaker at national and international meetings. He serves as the Vice Chair of the Planning and Award Review Committee of the American Association of Orthodontist Foundation and has previously served as an orthodontic site visitor for Commission on Dental Accreditation. He is an Alumnus of the ADEA Leadership Institute serving as the inaugural ADEA/ADEAGies Foundation Drs. Connie L. and Richard R. Drisko Scholar. He also served as the President of the Craniofacial Biology Group of the International Association of Dental Research.

Abstract

Many methods to expedite orthodontic tooth movement have been developed with little promise for current practice. However, the research has led to an affirmation that the benefits of reduction in treatment time is a worthy goal. We will describe and compare animal models to study tooth movement with the focus on tissue level bone biology and relate this fundamental information to tooth movement in humans and clinical practice. Forces for orthodontic tooth movement remain undefined. We will expand on the need to understand the force and engineering stress to produce optimal tooth movements and thus expediting/optimizing tooth movement. In the future, orthodontic tooth movement are likely to be individualize in a patient based on tooth root surface area, anchorage segments, desirable versus undesirable tooth movements, besides gender/age thereby producing direct path and personalized tooth movements for each patient. The participant will thus be exposed to most recent concepts and evidence based methods to achieving orthodontic tooth movements.

10:00

[Part 3] Orthodontic Boards Around the World

Kahl-Nieke Barbel

German Board of Orthodontics: How to become a Diplomate

Kahl-Nieke Barbel

Professional Experience and Education

2019 - 2020 President EOS, EOS Congress 10-14 June Hamburg
2013 - 2016 President of the German Society of Dental, Oral and Cranio-mandibular Sciences (DGZMK)
2008 - 2014 Vice-President of the European Federation of Orthodontics (FEO)
2007 - 2009 Dean of Education, Medical Faculty, University of Hamburg
2005 - 2009 President of the German Orthodontic Society
Since 2003 Vice-Chair of the German Board of Orthodontics and Orofacial Orthopaedics
2002 President of the Annual Meeting of the German Orthodontic Society in Hamburg
Since 2002 Head of the Center for Dental and Oral Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf
Since 1998 Chair and Head of the Dept. of Orthodontics, University of Hamburg
1994 Habilitation (Ph. D. degree), Thesis “Long-term clinical evaluation of orthodontic treatment”
1992 Research fellow and guest-lecturer at the Dept. of Orthodontics, School of Dental Medicine, University of Connecticut, USA
1986 - 1994 Associate Professor at the Dept. of Orthodontics, University of Cologne
1982 - 1986 Postgraduate Student at the Dept. of Orthodontics, University of Co-logne
1986 Doctorate (Dr. med. dent.),
Thesis “Update of the dentition table of I. Schour and M. Massler from 1941 with special consideration of premolars and wisdom teeth”
1976 - 1981 Dental School at the Justus-Liebig-University Giesen

Honors and Awards

2018 Teaching Award of the City of Hamburg
2009 “Teacher of the Year” Award University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf
2007 Research Award “Arnold-Biber-Preis” donated by DENTAURUM for the project “Age-dependent three-dimensional microcomputed tomography analysis of the human midpalatal suture” by Korbmacher H and Kahl-Nieke B

Research Interests

Specific scientific and clinical expertises:

  • treatment timing
  • early orthodontic treatment of Class III and other malocclusions
  • orthodontic treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis, temporomandibular joint disorders and hemifacial microsomia
  • orthodontic treatment of cleft-lip-and-palate patients as well as of adults with orthodon-tic / surgical treatment needs

Author and co-author of almost 100 original articles and author of chapters in textbooks, e.g. Kahl-Nieke B: Retention and stability considerations for adult patients. In Nanda R (ed): The Dental Clinics of North America, Adult Orthodontics I. Saunders Philadelphia, 1996, Vol. 40 (4), pp 961-994
Author of the textbook “Introduction to Orthodontics”, 1st and 2nd ed., Urban & Fischer, Munich, 2001, 3rd ed. Deutscher Ärzteverlag, Cologne, 2009
Also published in Polish in 2005

[Part 3] Orthodontic Boards Around the World

Adilson Luiz Ramos

Brazilian Board of Orthodontics: past, present, and future

Adilson Luiz Ramos
1994 - 2020 Associate Professor, State University of Maringa, Brazil
2019 - 2020 Director of the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics
2003 - 2006 Former Editor-in-chief of the Dental Press Journal of Orthodontics , the official publication of the Brazilian Association of Orthodontics
1998 - 2001 PhD at State University of Sao Paulo UNESP, Araraquara, Brazil
1992 - 1995 MS in Orthodontics at University of Sao Paulo USP, Bauru, Brazil
1989 - 1992 Residence Program at Craniofacial Anomalies Rehabilitation Hospital HRAC, University of Sao Paulo USP, Bauru, Brazil
1995 - 2020 Member of the Brazilian Association of Orthodontics
1998 - 2020 Member of the World Federation of Orthodontics
1996 - 2020 Member of the American Association of Orthodontics
2019 - 2020 Guest Member of the Angle Society of Orthodontics, North Atlantic Component

[Part 3] Orthodontic Boards Around the World

Ryuzo Kanomi

The System of Japanese Orthodontic Board

Ryuzo Kanomi, DDS, DDSc, PhD

Professional Experience and Education

2008- Adjunct Lecturer, Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics of Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, Japan
2008-2013 Adjunct Clinical Professor, Department of Orthodontics at Osaka University, Japan
2002 PhD, Orthodontics, Osaka University, Japan
1989 DDSc, Pedodontics, Osaka Dental University, Japan
1980- Director, Kanomi Dental Office, Japan
1977 DDS, Osaka Dental University, Japan

Honors and Awards

Joseph E. Johnson Table Clinic Awards by A.A.O. (1994, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2001)

Research Interests

Early Treatment Orthodontics, Orthodontic Anchor Screw

[Part 3] Orthodontic Boards Around the World

Winifred Harding

Down Under Differences

Winifred Jessie Harding

Education

BDS 1978, MDS Orthodontics 1985 University of Otago, New Zealand

Professional Experience

1986 to present - Professional Practice Fellow in the Discipline of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Otago, New Zealand
1986 to present - Self-employed orthodontist in private practice
Current Chair of the Foundation for Orthodontic Research and Education, New Zealand Association of Orthodontists
2002 - 2008 Secretary, Vice President and then President of the New Zealand Association of Orthodontists
2008 - 2019 Australasian Orthodontic Board Student Liaison University of Otago
Actively involved in mentoring young orthodontists
Chair of the 'Wish for a Smile' selection committee
Actively involved in the training of Orthodontic Auxiliaries

Honors and Awards

2018 Honorary Life Member of the New Zealand Association of Orthodontists
2017 Fellow of the International College of Dentists

Research interests

The delivery of orthodontic care in New Zealand
Qualitative aspects of specialist orthodontic practice in New Zealand
Factors influencing treatment time
Aspects of Cervical Vertebral Maturation and Dental Development in New Zealand Children

[Part 3] Orthodontic Boards Around the World

Shailesh Deshmukh

20 YEAR JOURNEY OF THE INDIAN BOARD OF ORTHODONTICS

Prof. Dr. SHAILESH V. DESHMUKH

M.D.S.; M.ORTH.R.C.S.(EDIN.UK); FDSRCSEd. (EDIN.UK)
DIPLOMATE INDIAN BOARD OF ORTHODONTICS

Teaching Experience of 27 years

Professor Bharati Vidyapeeth Deemed to be University Dental College & Hospital
Member Board of Studies Bharati Vidyapeeth Deemed to be University, Pune
Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh, UK.
Membership in Orthodontics Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh, UK.

Honors & Awards

President Indian Dental Association, Pune Branch, India, 2018-2019
President Indian Orthodontic Society, 2017-2018
Chairman Indian Board of Orthodontics, 2015-2016
Vice- Chairman Indian Board of Orthodontics, 2014-2015
Secretary & Treasurer Indian Board of Orthodontics, 2013-2014
Director Indian Board of Orthodontics, 2012-2013
Director Indian Board of Orthodontics, 2011-2012
PhD Guide
Postgraduate Guide & Facilitator
Fellow World Federation of Orthodontists
Member American Association of Orthodontists
Reviewer European Journal of Orthodontics
Reviewer APOS Journal
Reviewer Journal of the Indian Orthodontic Society

Research Interests

Miniscrews & the Transverse Dimension
Digital Orthodontics
3D Technology

11:00

International Board Symposium

11:20-11:30

Society of World Boards, The Road Ahead

Thomas Ahman
Thomas Ahman

American Association of Orthodontists Speaker of the House
Chair, AAO Council on Membership, Ethics and Judicial Affairs
Past President, Great Lakes Association of Orthodontists
Private practice 32 years

12:00
13:00

Problems in Orthodontic Treatment

13:00-14:45

Problems in Orthodontic Treatment

Anne Marie Kuijpers-Jagtman

An evidence based approach to external apical root resorption

Anne Marie Kuijpers-Jagtman

Orthodontists are afraid of causing external apical root resorption (EARR) in their patients as an unwanted side effect of orthodontic treatment. About half of all orthodontically moved teeth show mild to moderate EARR (< 2.5 mm), but luckily only a small percentage end up with severe apical root resorption, defined as a loss of 4 mm of the original root length or more than a third of the root. On the other hand, on the microscopic level over 90% of all orthodontically moved teeth exhibit EARR.
The etiology of EARR is still not fully understood resulting in much uncertainty about how to prevent EARR and how to manage it when it occurs during orthodontic treatment. Furthermore, little is known about the long-term stability and prognosis of affected teeth, including their mobility, vitality, and periodontal status. Despite these uncertainties, patients need to be treated. The Dutch Association of Orthodontists took the initiative to develop a clinical practice guideline through a rigorous methodological approach to support clinicians in making treatment decisions and informing their patients.

Abstract

An evidence based approach to external apical root resorption

Problems in Orthodontic Treatment

Glenn Sameshima

Orthodontic Root Resorption : An Update for the Clinician

Glenn Sameshima

Professional Experience and Education

2003-current Chair and Program Director, USC Orthodontics
2000-current Associate Professor, Department of Orthodontics, Dept of Craniofacial Biology, University of Southern California, USA
1994-2000 Assistant Professor, Department of Orthodontics, University of Southern California, USA
1991- PhD, Craniofacial Biology, University of Southern California, USA
1989- Certificate, Orthodontics, University of Southern California, USA

Honors and Awards

Research Interests

Orthodontic Root Resorption
Imaging of Orthodontic Root Movement
Digital Technology and Patient Education

Abstract

We all learned that every time we move a tooth, root resorption occurs. However it is reversible and temporary unless it starts at the root apex. Severe root resorption is fortunately rare but nevertheless is still an important consideration. This presentation will summarize what we currently know from all the different studies that have been done ranging from animal studies to theoretical models to genetic studies but mostly from clinical studies and clinical experience. Eight of the most frequently asked questions will be answered that will provide the clinician with the most up to date knowledge focusing mainly on clinical management of root resorption if found at progress or at the end, and which patients are at greater risk.

Problems in Orthodontic Treatment

Stavros Kiliaridis

Occlusal interferences: How do they influence the orthodontic tooth movement?

Stavros Kiliaridis

Professional Experience and Education

Professor and Head, Dept. of Orthodontics, University of Geneva, Switzerland, 1999 until present.
Professor and Head, Dept. of Orthodontics, University of Athens, Greece, May 2008 to September 2009.
Associate Professor, Dept. of Orthodontics, Goteborg University, Sweden, 1990 to 1999.
Coordinator of specialist education in Orthodontics, Goteborg University, Sweden, 1996 to 1999.
Odont. Dr Ph.D. Dept. of Orthodontics, Goteborg University, Sweden, 1986.
Certificate in Orthodontics, Goteborg University, Sweden, 1984.
D.D.S. Graduation from the Dental School, University of Thessaloniki, Greece, 1979.

Honors and Awards

The European Orthodontic Society Essay Award, London, 1988.
Alton Moore Lecture, University of Washington, Seattle, USA, 2002.
Houston Award, Dudic, Giannopoulou, Kiliaridis, European Orthodontic Society, 2005
Senior Robert Frank Award, Clinical Research, Christou, Kiliaridis, IADR European Division, 2007
Senior Robert Frank Award, Clinical Research, Schimmel, Kiliaridis, Muller, IADR European Division, 2012
Sheldon Friel lecture, European Orthodontic Society, 2015

Coordinator of the European Orthodontic Teachers Forum 2007 to 2019.
President of the Network for Erasmus Based European Orthodontic Programmes, NEBEOP 2017 to 2019.

Research Interests

Clinical and experimental studies on masticatory function and craniofacial growth.
Methods to evaluate the functional capacity of the masticatory muscles.
Dentofacial growth and oral function in patients with Neuromuscular diseases.
Clinical and experimental studies on postemergent continuous tooth eruption.
Influence of functional appliances on dentofacial structures and masticatory muscles.

Over 220 research papers and book-chapters

Abstract

In a previous study (Dudic et al 2013) we found that during an experimentally induced orthodontic tooth movement the presence of interarch interferences decreased the amount of tooth displacement. In the treatment of Class II cases the shift of the molar occlusion from Class II to Class I is often essential to achieve an optimal treatment result. Our hypothesis was that the functional capacity of the masticatory musculature could be a predictive variable in determining the functional appliance treatment outcomes in Class II/1 malocclusion children. During the last decade, we tested this hypothesis in three different samples treated with Tween blocks, Schwarz activators and Andreasen activators, and we found that children with lower pre-treatment maximal molar bite force showed more mesial movement of mandibular first molars, distal movement of maxillary first molars, and larger change in molar class during treatment. Children with thinner pre-treatment masseter muscles demonstrated more mandibular first molar mesialisation and mandibular incisor proclination (Antonarakis, Kiliaridis, 2015, Antonarakis et al 2012, Kiliaridis et al 2010)
In conclusion, the initial condition of the masticatory muscles may partly determine treatment outcomes. Children with thinner pre-treatment masseter muscles or weaker bite force show greater dentoalveolar changes.

Airway

Won Moon

Non-Surgical Expansion with Midfacial Skeletal Expander (MSE) for Upper Airway Obstructive Patients

Won Moon

Professional Experience and Education

2013-2019 Thomas R. Bales Endowed Chair in Orthodontics, UCLA School of Dentistry
2012-2019 Program Director, Section of Orthodontics, UCLA School of Dentistry
2007-2015 Clinic Director, Section of Orthodontics, UCLA School of Dentistry
2003-2019 Director, International Affairs, Section of Orthodontics, UCLA School of Dentistry
1989-1991 UCLA Post-Doctoral Orthodontic Residency Program and MS in Oral Biology, UCLA School of Dentistry
1984-1989 DMD, Harvard School of Dental Medicine
1980-1984 BS, Mathematics, University of California Irvine

Honors and Awards

2019 Inspirational Leadership and Dedication Award, UCLA School of Dentistry
2018 AAOF 2018 Center Grant Award, AAOF
2014 Groundbreaking Research Project Grant Award (Decoding the Harmonic Face), UCLA School of Dentistry

Research Interests

Mid-facial expansion, 3D image analysis, Genomewide Association Study of Craniofacial Phenotypes, Finite Element Model (FEM), Applications of 3D Printing, Orthopedic Correction, Airway Changes, Accelerated Tooth Movement, and Micro-implant (MI) Design study

Abstract

The primary aim of this presentation is to illustrate how the maxillary skeletal expander (MSE) has evolved from its birth, by examining the dental and skeletal effects of maxillary expansion when the conventional rapid palatal expander (RPE), the surgically-assisted rapid palatal expander (SARPE), and the micro-implant assisted MSE are used. Dental expansion, bone bending, and true skeletal expansion will be compared. The adverse clinical consequences of RPE and SARPE will be explored, and a new approach eliminating these problems by the use of MSE will be presented. Clinical cases involving non-surgical midfacial expansion in both adolescent and adult patients will be examined.

The secondary aim is to demonstrate other advantages of utilizing MSE. Many patients requiring maxillary expansion often have narrow nasal airways, and positive changes in nasal airway with application of MSE are common. Clinical cases and research findings illustrating the enlargement of nasal airways after MSE in both adolescent and adult patients will be evaluated. Furthermore, improved breathing capacity after MSE expansion will be illustrated by dynamic airflow measurements and computational fluid dynamic simulations. The use of growth modification and distraction-like expansion and protraction techniques in conjunction with this new device open the door to many new possibilities, especially for patients with nasal airway obstruction and Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome.

The latest findings from the UCLA research team will be presented in order to enhance depth of understanding in impact of MSE for improving the upper airway.

Airway

Leslie A Will

Update on Orthognathic Surgery: Long Term Stability and Relationship to Airway

Leslie A Will

Professional Experience and Education

2009-present Chair and Program Director, Boston University Department of Orthodontics
2007-2009 Program Director, Tufts University Department of Orthodontics
1998-2007 Chair and Program Director, Department of Growth and Development, Harvard School of Dental Medicine
1995-1998 Associate Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago Department of Orthodontics
1982-1989 Assistant Professor, Loyola University of Chicago Department of Orthodontics
1982 MSD and certificate, University of Washington
1980 DMD, Harvard University

Honors and Awards

1980 American Association of Orthodontists Award for Exceptional Interest in the development of the Oro-facial Complex
2000 ELAM Fellow

Research Interests

  • Treatment outcomes
  • Development of dentoskeletal norms using cone beam CT
  • Characterization of skeletal transverse discrepancies with CBCT
  • Quality of life in orthodontic and orthognathic patients
  • Normal and abnormal growth and development

Abstract

Orthognathic surgical procedures are a reliable method of correcting dentoskeletal deformities of the jaws. These procedures have shown good long term stability in two dimensions. However, three-dimensional assessment of the long term stability of bimaxillary surgery is lacking in the literature.
Sixty-one patients had CBCTs taken at three time points: preoperative (T0), postoperative (T1) (10 days-8 weeks), and at least one year after the surgery (T2). Patients were divided into two groups according to the rotation of the occlusal plane during surgery.
Thirty-three anatomical landmarks were identified, and measurements were taken relative to 7 planes to assess multiplanar movement of each jaw. Overall, 17 measurements showed significant differences between T1 and T2.
Results shows that the bimaxillary advancement procedures were stable for at least one year except for lengthening of the mandible as measured between the mental foramen and lingula and widening of the gonial angles.

Part of this sample also had airway assessments pre- and postoperatively which were evaluated for changes in nasal cavity, nasopharyngeal, oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal compartments. The amount of movement for each surgery was measured from skeletal landmarks to reference planes and was correlated with volumetric changes.

Bimaxillary advancement significantly increased nasopharyngeal (27.45%), oropharyngeal (66.39%), and hypopharyngeal (52.48%) volumes. For every millimeter anterior movement, oropharyngeal volume increased by 2319.2±771.8 mm3, while every millimeter downward movement showed a significant increase in nasopharyngeal volume.

These results show that bimaxillary surgery is stable for at least 1 year postoperatively and leads to significant increases in airway volume.

Airway

Yuehua Liu

Upper airway dilatation and dentofacial growth modification in children with obstructive sleep apnea

Yuehua Liu

Professional Experience and Education

Dr. LIU Yuehua is a Professor and Dean of Shanghai Stomatological Hospital, Fudan University. He got the Ph. D degree in 1996 from Peking University and was a Postdoctoral fellow in the University of British Columbia, Canada from 1998 to 2000.

Honors and Awards

Now he is an Executive Member of the Council and Vice-President of Chinese Orthodontic Society of Chinese Stomatological Association (CSA), Vice-Director of the Council and Immediately Past President of Shanghai Orthodontic Society of Shanghai Stomatological Association (SSA), an Examiner in Orthodontics, the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh.Professor LIU has been in charge of 6 General Programs of National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), published over 30 peer-reviewed papers on SCI Journals and authorized 4 National Invention patents. In addition, he was awarded the second prize of the advanced science and technology, Ministry of Education, PRC, in 2002 and the second prize of the advanced medical science and technology, Chinese Association of Medicine, PRC, in 2003.

Research Interests

He has been interested in rensearch in obstructive sleep apnea in children, dentofacial vertical control for profile improvement, and lingual orthodontics.

Abstract

The etiologic factors of Obstructive sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome(OSAHS) include anatomic narrowing and dysfunction of uppe airway. The pathogenesis,treatment stratege and prognosis of OSAHS in children could be different from that in adult. The manifestation of those children with OSAHS may include hypertrophy of tonsils and adenoid, mouth breathing, narrowed upper arch, clockwise rotated mandilbe,and uppe airway narrowing. Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy could never eliminate the symptoms of OSAHS in children because hard tissue anatomic abnormality surrounding uppe airway still exist. In this presentation, the children with different sererity of OSAHS were subdivided into several groups with different therapies. those therapeutic methods include Tonsillectomy & adenoidectomy, oral appliance for upper arch expansion and mandibular advancement, and myofunctional reeducation. the subjective and objective treatment efficency to OSAHS were assessed by using questionnaire, and polysomnography. The effects of dentofacial growth modification from oral appliances and myofunctional reeducation were measured and analysed. The results demonstrated that combination of various methods may achievevd more satisfied curative effect.

Rising Stars

13:00-14:45

Rising Stars

Noriaki Ono

An orthodontist tale of cellular plasticity and stem cell activation in skeletal development and regeneration

Noriaki Ono

Professional Experience and Education

2014 - 2020 Assistant Professor, Department of Orthodontics & Pediatric Dentistry, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
2012 - 2014 Instructor, Endocrine Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
2009 - 2012 Research Fellow, Endocrine Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
2007 - 2009 Clinical Fellow in Orthodontics, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan
2007 PhD, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan
2003 DDS, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan

Honors and Awards

2017 Most Outstanding Basic Abstract Award, American Society for Bone and Mineral Research
2012 Young Investigator Award, American Society for Bone and Mineral Research
2011 Gideon and Sevgi Rodan Fellowship Award, International Bone and Mineral Research
2003 Nagao Academic Award (for summa cum laude), Tokyo Medical and Dental University
2003 Kobayashi Ikueikai Award (for excellence in clinic), Tokyo Medical and Dental University

Research Interests

Skeletal stem cells and bone regeneration
Mechanism of bone development
Growth plate and cartilage biology

Abstract

Orthodontists can do amazing things for bones and teeth, but what is actually going on? I have been asking the fundamental question about special bone cells called skeletal stem cells, and what these cells do for us over the last decade. Skeletal stem cells are the cells that can produce a variety of bone cells with important functions in bone health and diseases. Our recent findings are beginning to unravel their unique properties: these stem cells are diverse, malleable and local in nature. For example, we have identified skeletal stem cells in the resting zone of the growth plate cartilage - these stem cells look exactly like chondrocytes that usually make cartilages, but acquire special features of life-long self-renewal. The question is how a small number of skeletal stem cells are maintained in adulthood: our more recent findings point to the possibility that some types of functionally dedicated mature bone cells, such as those residing in bone marrow space termed bone marrow stromal cells, can revert into stem cells under special conditions. In this lecture, I will present the current concept on skeletal stem cells, and how they can help our daily and future orthodontic practice.

Rising Stars

Akihiro Yasue

Identification of gene mutations in oligodontia patients and in vivo functional analysis of genes using genome editing technology

Akihiro Yasue

Professional Experience and Education

2014-Present Senior Lecturer, Department of Orthodontics, Tokushima University, Japan
2009-2014 Research Associate, Department of Orthodontics, Tokushima University, Japan
2008-2009 Fellow, Baylor College of Dentistry, Texas, U.S.A
2005-2008 Fellow, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Dental Branch, Texas, U.S.A
2004-2005 Research Associate, Department of Orthodontics, Tokushima University, Japan
2003-2004 Postdoc, Department of Orthodontics, Tokushima University, Japan
2002-2003 Resident, Tokushima University, Japan
1998-2002 PhD, Tokushima University Graduate School of Dentistry, Japan

Honors and Awards

2004 Award for Encouragement of Research, JADR
2010 Award for Encouragement of Research, JADR
2012 Award for Encouragement of Research, Japanese Cleft Palate Association
2001 Bernard G. Sarnat Award, Craniofacial Biology Group, IADR

Research Interests

Tooth Development, Oligodontia, Genome editing technology

Abstract

Non-syndromic tooth agenesis or isolated hypodontia is the most common human malformation. The prevalence of the condition ranges from 1.6% to 9.6% in different populations. Non-syndromic tooth agenesis has been reported to be associated with heterozygous mutations in MSX1, PAX9, WNT10A and WNT10B. MSX1 and PAX9 are the most reported genes associated with agenesis of the premolars and/or molars. Oligodontia patients with PAX9 mutation exhibit clear phenotype with agenesis in molar region, on the other hand, the patients with mutations in MSX1 gene show various phenotypes including agenesis of the premolars.
Previous functional analyses for detected mutations have been examined with cell culture system because of the methodological limitation. It means that the causality of the reported mutations detected in small pedigrees or unclear phenotypes is not always reliable. Recently, more than half of patients with hypodontia were reported to have WNT10A mutation without any functional analysis of the gene, however, the causality is statistically questionable. For such a reason, the genotype/phenotype correlation is occasionally in a state of chaos.
The presentation will show the mutation detection of the genes for the patient with oligodontia using next-generation sequencing technology-based targeted panel sequencing analysis which improves the molecular diagnosis in target genes. The presentation will also make clear the causality of pathogenic SNVs using genome editing technology in mice. This strategy showing tooth phenotype can be a useful method to verify genotype/phenotype correlation of human disorders. For Msx1 gene, in vivo functional analysis for each conserved domain will also be presented.

Cleft Lip and Palate

13:00-14:45

Cleft Lip and Palate

Jonathan R Sandy

Orthodontists central to health care in cleft lip and palate

Jonathan R Sandy

Professional Experience and Education

2014 to 2019 Dean of Medicine, Dentistry and Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Bristol.
2007 to 2014 Head of Bristol Dental School, University of Bristol.
1991 to 2020 Consultant Senior Lecturer, Reader, Professor in Orthodontics, Bristol Dental School, University of Bristol.
1988 to1991 Post-Doctoral research scientist, Biochemistry Department University of Cambridge.
1985 to 1988 PhD, Dental Institute, University of London, Eastman Dental Hospital.
1979 to 1985 Orthodontic training, Dental Institute, University of London, Eastman Dental Hospital.
1972 to 1976 Undergraduate dental training, Kings College Dental School, University of London

Honors and Awards

2007 FGDP Fellowship Ad Eundem, Royal College of Surgeons of England
2006 Northcroft Memorial Lecturer, British Orthodontic Society
2005 The Clifford Ballard Memorial Lecture, British Orthodontic Society
2005 Faculty Teaching & Learning Prize, University of Bristol
2005 British Orthodontic Society Distinction Award
2001 King James IV Professorship, Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh
2001 Charles Tomes Lecture, Royal College of Surgeons of England
1998 Fellowship of the Academy of Medical Sciences
1992 Colyer Prize, Royal Society of Medicine
1990 Chapman Prize British Society for the Study of Orthodontics
1985 Medical Research Council Research Training Fellowship for 3 years
1984 Association of University Teachers in Orthodontics Research Prize

Research interests

My research interests are centred around children born with orofacial clefting. I supported the National Institute for Health Research funded programme, Cleft Care UK, where we evaluated the impact of the centralisation of cleft services following the recommendations made by the Clinical Standards Advisory Group CSAG in 1998. I lead the Scar Free Foundation birth cohort gene backed study known as the Cleft Collective.

Abstract

The care of children born with a cleft lip and palate requires multidisciplinary care from a wide range of healthcare professionals and arguably, as this is a repairable structural anomaly, the surgeons (from whatever parent discipline) would be expected to be pivotal in organising healthcare of these children.
It is the orthodontists who have had influence in how changes in service and research can be used to improve outcomes with clear objective evidence to inform care configurations. In the United Kingdom (UK) this evolved from early work by Mike Mars in Great Ormond Street where he identified how craniofacial growth and dento-alveolar relationships are influenced in oro-facial clefting and by surgical treatment. In conjunction with Gunvor Semb from Oslo he developed measures of dento-alveolar relations (the GOSLON Index) which enabled surgical outcomes to be assessed by proxy. This was one of the measures used in the seminal six centre Eurocleft study led by Bill Shaw and the outcomes of this (where the two UK centres consistently had the worst results) informed the need for a review of cleft services in the UK. Using research from Manchester and Bristol, the Clinical Standards Advisory Group study published a report in 1998 and cleft services in the UK were centralised over several years. In a follow up study, the impact of this centralisation has yielded significant changes and improvements in overall cleft care in the UK and this has also enabled further research opportunities for clinical and genetic research.

Cleft Lip and Palate

Naoto Suda

Regenerative medicine and orthodontic treatment for cleft lip and palate children

Naoto Suda
2010-present Professor, Division of Orthodontics, Department of Human Development and Fostering, Meikai University School of Dentistry
2005-2010 Lecturer, Maxillofacial Orthognathics, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University
1998-2004 Assistant Professor, Maxillofacial Orthognathics, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University
1996-1997 Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science
1993-1995 Visiting Academics, St. Vincent Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne University
1988-1992 Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Ph.D)
1982-1988 Faculty of Dentistry, Hokkaido University

Abstract

Cleft lip and palate (CLP) causes various morphological and functional problems in esthetics of nose and lip, feeding, speech and occlusion. Among them, correction of occlusion requires long and comprehensive intervention. It is important to minimize the burden of orthodontic treatment, together with providing successful outcome for patients with CLP. The condition of intermaxillary relation, maxillary arch form, and normal tooth eruption are all related to the difficulty of orthodontic correction. A tight collaboration of orthodontists with other specialists in related fields is essential to reduce the burden of CLP children.
The regular treatment protocol in our area is to perform Millard-type gingivoperiosteoplasty (GPP) together with cheiloplasty at 3-6 months old after presurgical infant orthopedics using passive plate. Furlow palatoplasty was performed at 12-18 months old. Early alveolar closure by GPP can enable the normal maxillary arch form with integrated alveolus, and avoid performing secondary bone graft. However, labio-lingual width and alveolar height are insufficient in some cases. Regenerative medicine using the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is expected as a useful strategy to increase bone bridge formation. We isolated MSCs from human umbilical cord and transplanted with hydroxyapatite and collagen into the animal model of alveolar cleft. The human umbilical cord derived MSCs could induce successful bone bridge formation in this model.
In this presentation, some possible attempts are going to be discussed to reduce the burden of orthodontic treatment for CLP children.

14:00
15:00

Open Bite Treatment

Greg J Huang

Results from the National Adult Anterior Openbite Study

Greg J Huang

Professional Experience and Education

Professor & Chair University of Washington 2011 to present
Chair, AAO Practice-based Research Network Committee 2013 to 2015
ADA CODA: Consultant for graduate orthodontics 2008 to 2014
Associate Editor, AJODO 2004 to 2013
PCSO representative to the AAO Council on Scientific Affairs     2004 to 2013
Member, Edward H. Angle Society 2004 to present
Diplomate, American Board of Orthodontics 1998 to present

Textbooks: Orthodontics:

Current Principles and Techniques, 6th Ed. 2016
Evidence-based Orthodontics, 2nd Ed, 2018

University of Washington     MPH received 2001 Epidemiology
University of Washington MSD received 1989 Dentistry
University of Washington Certificate received 1989     Orthodontics
University of Florida DMD received 1987 Dentistry

Honors and Awards

2020 Jarabak Award
2019 Mershon Lecturer
2015 ADA Evidence-based Faculty Award
2014 PCSO Award of Merit

Research Interests

Anterior Openbite
Long-term stability of orthodontic treatment
Third molars
White Spot lesions
Accelerated tooth movement
Evidence-based Orthodontics

Abstract

Dr. Huang will present findings from the National Adult Anterior Openbite Study, which was conducted in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network. The study enrolled 91 practitioners and 347 patients from across the United States. Data was collected from 3 time points, initial, end-of-treatment, and up to one year post-treatment. Dr. Huang will describe the treatment recommendations for these adult patients, along with the facotrs related to these recommendations. He will then discuss the success rates associated with 4 major categories of treatment: aligners, fixed appliances, TADs, and orthognathic surgery, along with patient satisfaction at the end of treatment. He will also review the mechanism by which openbites were corrected using the 4 treatment categories, based on cephalometric analyses. The incisor, molar, and skeletal movements that accompanied different types of treatment were sometimes unexpected. Finally, he will present information on the stability of correction up to one year post-treatment, as well as long-term satisfaction.

Open Bite Treatment

Roberto Justus

Stability of open bite treatment with spur therapy

Roberto Justus

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE AND EDUCATION

2014 to 2019 Adjunct Professor, AT Still Univ., Graduate Dept. of Orthodontics, Phoenix, AZ, USA
2010 to 2015 WFO President
2007 to 2010 Chair, WFO Orthodontic Boards Committee
2005 Examiner, Italian Board of Orthodontics
2003 to 2004 President, ABO College of Diplomates
2002 to 2019 Examiner, ABO
1996 to 2019 AJODO (reviewer)
1995 to 1998 President Latin American Assoc. of Orthodontists
1994 to 2019 Editorial Board Member: "Seminars in Orthodontics" and "Revista Clinica de Ortodontia" (Dental Press, Brazil)
1990 Diplomate ABO
1988 to 2019 Research Director, Graduate Dept. of Orthodontics, Intercontinental Univ., MEXICO
1970 to 2019 Professor orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Technological Univ. of Mexico, MEXICO
1969 to 1970 Professor graduate orthodontics, Dept. of Orthodontics, UNAM, MEXICO
1968 MSD, Dept. of Orthodontics, Univ. of Wash., Seattle, USA

AWARDS

2018 "Honorary Member Award", British Orthodontic Society
2013 "Louise Ada Jarabak Award", American Assoc. of Orthodontists Foundation
2011 "Dale B. Wade Award", ABO
2007 "Dentistry Distinguished Professor Award", Universidad Tecnologica de Mexico
2002 "National Orthodontic Excellence Award", Mexican Association of Orthodontists
1993 "Best Lecturer 1993 Meeting Award", Latin American Association of Orthodontists, Lima, Peru
1966 "Best Dental Student in Mexico Award", Diario de Mexico newspaper

HONORS

2018 WFO Executive Committee honored me for "Promoting the establishment of Orthodontic Certifying Boards around the world"
2015 Springer Publishing Co. honored me for authoring the orthodontic textbook: "Iatrogenic Effects of Orthodontic Treatment, Decision Making in Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment"
2012 Univ. of Wash honored me as "2012 Kokich Shapiro Visiting Scholar"
2010 Seminars in Orthodontics honored me as "Guest Editor" March 2010 issue
2010 Mexican Association of Orthodontists honored me naming its 2010 meeting as the "Roberto Justus 43rd Annual Meeting"
2006 Intercontinental Univ., Graduate Dept of Orthodontics, honored me for "Excellence as Professor and Research Director"

RESEARCH INTERESTS

Clinical orthodontics

Abstract

The high relapse incidence of anterior open bite malocclusion is frequently due to an anterior tongue rest posture. A maxillary fixed intraoral appliance with spurs is recommended to modify tongue posture. Research with this appliance in a large sample of anterior open bite patients demonstrated long term stability post retention.
You will learn why:
-Long term stability of open bite closure is no better than 80%.
-Myofunctional therapy with oral exercises is ineffective in closing open bites.
-TADs used for anterior open bite closure might not have a stable outcome.
-Fixed intraoral spurs are recommended to establish a normal tongue rest posture (a new engram).
-Spurs modify tongue posture and also interrupt digit sucking habits.
-The anterior open bite closes with spurs, without using brackets or wires.
-Long term stability post retention is achieved when spurs are used.
-Spurs are indicated or contraindicated.
-Early correction of open bite protects roots from resorbing.
-Intraoral spurs do not provoke psychological problems.
You will learn the:
-Risk factors for anterior open bite.
-In office construction of the spur appliance.

Open Bite Treatment

Tae-Woo Kim

Strategic approach to treat the open bite efficiently and to retain the stable result

Tae-Woo Kim

Education

1983 - 1984 Internship, Seoul National University, Dental Hospital
1984 - 1986 Residency, Seoul National University, Dental Hospital, Department of Orthodontics
1986 Master of Dental Surgery. Seoul National University, Graduate School
1993 Ph.D, Seoul National University, Graduate School

Academic activities

May 1990 - Mar. 1994 Fellow Doctor, Department of Orthodontics, Seoul National University Dental Hospital
Mar. 1994 - Mar. 1996 Full-time Lecturer, Department of Orthodontics, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University
April 1996 - Mar 2001 Assistant Professor, Department of Orthodontics, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University
April 2001 - Mar 2004 Associate Professor, Department of Orthodontics, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University
Dec. 1995 - Dec. 1997, Jul. - Sep. 2011
Visiting Professor, Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Washington
Aug. - Oct. 2007 Visiting professor, Department of Orthodontics, University of California, Los Angeles
April 1994 - Dec. 1995, April 1998 - Mar. 2002
Editor-in-Chief, Korean Journal of Orthodontists
April 2014 - Mar. 2016 President, Korean Association of Orthodontists

Honors and Awards

Oct. 2017 Kwan Song Award, Korean Association of Orthodontists
Sept. 20-21, 2018 Kokich-Saphiro lecture, University of Washington

Research Interest

TMD, open bite, mini-implants and long-term stability

Abstract

Open bite has been one of interesting fields to me, since I started orthodontic residency in 1983. In my department, I have many open bite cases, especially with TMD, because they are referred from local clinics and other orthodontists. Seoul National University Dental Hospital is the final destination of problem cases in South Korea. I think more than 60 % of my patients are open bite cases.
Anterior open bite is a very challenging malocclusion even for excellent orthodontists. It is very difficult to diagnose differentially and to retain the post-treatment result well, because one case may have several etiologic factors. Since MRI and CT were used to screen the etiologic factors, I have realized once more that 'open bite' is one sign of different diseases caused by thumb sucking, tongue thrusting, low tongue posture, mouth breathing, macroglossia, temporomandibular disease and ankyloses of anterior teeth. It cannot be overemphasized to try to find and to remove the causing factors first. According to the causes the open bite should be treated differentially. In this lecture, the following contents will be presented.
1)Etiologic factors of open bite
2)How to find and resolve the etiologic factors
3)Mechanics to close the open bite efficiently
4)Strategies to obtain the long-term stability

Open Bite Treatment

Flavia Artese

Open Bite: Are we treating the right causes?

Flavia Artese

Associate Professor of Orthodontics, Rio de Janeiro State University;
MSc and PhD in Orthodontics, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro;
Diplomate of the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics,
Member of the Angle Midwest Society,
Editor in Chief of the Dental Press Journal of Orthodontics,
Chair of the 10th International Orthodontic Congress.

Abstract

Anterior open bite is considered one of the malocclusions of most difficult treatment, especially regarding stability. The literature presents many researches on this subject, but with controversial information. There are disagreements on the definition of open bite, its etiology and types of treatment. Possibly, the lack of consensus on the etiology of the anterior open bite may have led to different types of treatment and can be the explanation for the high level of relapse of this malocclusion. The purpose of this presentation is to review the concepts of
anterior open bite focusing on etiology, treatment methods and their stability and present criteria for the diagnosis and treatment of this malocclusion, based in its etiology, with examples of treated cases, stable for over10 years.

Class II Treatment

15:25-17:10

Class II Treatment

Sabine Ruf

Class II Tx: success, stability and health effects

Sabine Ruf

Professional experience and Education

since 2005 Professor, Chair and Clinical Director for Orthodontics Justus-Liebig-University Giessen
2002-2005 Professor and Chair for Orthodontics University Bern, Switzerland
2001 Habilitation (Dr. med. dent. Habil.)
1995 Certified Orthodontist
1994 Doctorate (Dr. med. dent.) awarded
1986-1991 Undergraduate dental education Justus-Liebig-University Giessen
since 2017 Elected Member of the Scientific Committee of the Angle Society of Europe
since 2013 Deputy Executive Director Dental School Justus-Liebig-University Giessen
2009 Recognition as Active Member of the Angle Society of Europe
since 2007 Council Member German Orthodontic Society

Awards

  • Beni Solow Award European Orthodontic Society - Seniorautor (2019)
  • Best Lecture Award German Society Computerized Dentistry - Coauthor (2018)
  • Best Poster Award German Orthodontic Society (Clinical research)- Seniorauthor (2018)
  • Best Paper Award German Orthodontic Society - Seniorauthor (2018)
  • Young Investigator Award - German Orthodontic Society - Seniorauthor (2016)
  • Young Investigator Award - German Orthodontic Society - Seniorauthor (2011)
  • Best Paper Award German Orthodontic Society - Seniorauthor (2008)
  • Best Poster Award European Orthodontic Society - Coauthor (2006)
  • Young Investigator Award SGDMFR and ARö" - Seniorauthor (2006)
  • Best Poster Award European Orthodontic Society - Seniorauthor (2001)
  • Sixth S.I.D.O World Award Italian Orthodontic Society (1997)
  • W.J.B. Houston Research Award European Orthodontic Society (1997)

Main areas of interest

  • Dentofacial Orthopedics
  • Craniomandibular function and dysfunction
  • Stability and Relapse
  • Oral health and Orthodontics
  • Orthodontic Healthcare Research
  • Interactions general medicine and Orthodontics

Abstract

Class II Tx: success, stability and health effects
Class II malocclusions are frequent and multiple treatment techniques have been described. While data on dentoskeletal effects are abundant in literature, success rates have seldom been analyzed despite the fact, that possible success is the basis for any treatment decision a patient. Patients also become increasingly aware of the fact that orthodontic treatments have a relapse potential and in turn expect evidence-based estimates for the stability of their treatment. Furthermore, there is also increasing demand from our patients with respect to specific information on the general and/or oral health effects of orthodontic treatment.
The current lecture will give an overview of the current evidence available for the three above mentioned patient information demands (success, stability and health effects).
Attendees of this lecture will be able to:
-describe and compare the success rates of different Class II treatment approaches
-outline the long-term effects and stability of Class II treatment
-estimate the health benefits of Class II treatment

Class II Treatment

Lorenzo Franchi

Patient-dependent factors for the efficient treatment of Class II malocclusion

Lorenzo Franchi

Professional Experience and Education

2019- Dean of the School of Dentistry, University of Florence
2018-2019 Associate Professor, Section of Dentistry, Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, The University of Florence, Florence, Italy
2006-2018 Assistant Professor, Section of Dentistry, Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, The University of Florence, Florence, Italy
2001-2019 T.M. Graber Visiting Scholar, Department of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Honors and Awards

2003 Edward Angle and Angle Society Award for Excellence in Orthodontic Research, Best Scientific Paper 2001-03 - Baccetti T., Franchi L., Cameron C.G., McNamara J. A. Jr. Treatment timing for rapid maxillary expansion. The Angle Orthodontist, vol. 71, n.5, pp. 343-350, 2001.
2006 Best Table Clinic, Joseph E. Johnson Table Clinic Award 106 Annual Meeting of the American Association of Orthodontists, Las Vegas, USA, 5-9 May, 2006.
2011 WJB Houston Award for the Best oral research presentation (Co-Author), European Orthodontic Society, Istanbul, June 2011
2014 WJB Houston Award for the Best oral research presentation (Co-Author), European Orthodontic Society, Warsaw, June 2014
2016 Dr Stephen Seward Lecture titled Pathways of Effectiveness in the Orthopedic Treatment of Class II malocclusion, 25th Australian Orthodontic Congress, Melbourne, Australia, February 20th, 2016.

Research Interests

Dentofacial Orthopedics
Growth modification
Biomechanics

Abstract

This lecture will illustrate patient-related factors that potentially can improve the efficacy of Class II treatment. Two such factors will be discussed: 1) timing of treatment, defined on the basis of reliable indicators of individual skeletal maturity, and 2) individual patient responsiveness.
Functional appliances used for the treatment of Class II malocclusion are effective in altering short-and long-term mandibular growth and mandibular sagittal position if active treatment includes the pubertal growth spurt. To predict individual patient responsiveness, mandibular morphology should be evaluated at puberty. Good responders to functional jaw orthopedics (FJO) for the treatment of Class II malocclusion associated with mandibular retrusion are characterized by a small mandibular angle.

Genetics

Sylvia A. Frazier-Bowers

Designer Genes and Personalized Orthodontics: The Clinical Relevance of Genetic Advances

Sylvia A. Frazier-Bowers

Professional Experience and Education

December 1999 UNC at Chapel Hill PhD, Genetics & Molecular Biology
May 1997 UNC at Chapel Hill Certificate, Orthodontics
May 1993 University of Illinois at Chicago D.D.S., Dentistry
December 1991 University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign B.S., Dentistry
August 1987 University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign B.A., English, cognate in Biology
2018 to Present Assistant Dean, Inclusive Excellence and Equity Initiatives, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
2011 to Present Associate Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, School of Dentistry, Department of Orthodontics
2004 to 2011 Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, School of Dentistry, Department of Orthodontics
2006 to 2011 Adjunct Faculty, Carolina Center for Genome Sciences
2001 to 2004 Assistant Professor, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Dental Branch, Department of Orthodontics
2002 to 2004 Adjunct Faculty, UTHSCH Medical School, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Genetics Division
2000 to 2001 Postdoctoral Fellow andResearch Assistant Professor, UTHSCH, Dental Branch, Department of Orthodontics

Honors and Awards

2019 Relational Leadership Institute
2015 to 2017 Academic Leadership Program Fellow, UNC Institute for the Arts and Humanities
2013 SAO Faculty Lecture Award, Southern Association of Orthodontists
2012 Class of 2012, Excellence in Mentoring Award, SNDA, UNC School of Dentistry
2011 Class of 2011 Excellence in Teaching Award, Department of Orthodontics, UNC School of Dentistry
2009 UNC School of Dentistry Student Research Mentor Award
2006 2006 General Clinical Research Centers Outstanding Trainee Award
2006 UNC School of Dentistry Student Research Mentor Award
2006 UNC Junior Faculty Development Award (designated IBM fund award)
2002 2002 Earl Shepard Memorial Fellowship Award from the American Association of Orthodontist Foundation
2001 2001 Albert P Westfall Memorial Teaching Fellowship Award from the American Association of Orthodontist Foundation

Research Interests

My current efforts also broadly focus on gene discovery and phenotype dissection of dentofacial variation and eruption disorders using 2 and 3 dimensional methods for rigorous clinical characterization, genotyping and mutational analysis through the candidate gene approach.

Abstract

This lecture will provide an overview of current practices in the diagnosis and treatment of malocclusions with a genetic basis. We are quickly approaching a time when personalized orthodontics will be an integral part of our diagnostic regime just as it is with medicine. Taking a family history in fact represents the gold standard in the diagnosis and management of medical (and by extension) dental disorders. The objective of this lecture will be to recognize and diagnose both common and rare dental disorders encountered in orthodontic practices from both clinical and genetic perspectives. Data from genetic and clinical studies have helped to create a paradigm shift in contemporary orthodontic practices. Applying genetic knowledge to the field of orthodontics will augment the current differential diagnosis of dental disorders, permitting recognition of etiologically distinct disorders that respond to treatment in different ways. That is, proper diagnosis equals proper treatment. This session will include discussion of Primary Failure of Eruption, ankylosis, delayed eruption and Class III malocclusion with an emphasis on adopting a diagnostic rubric for proper management. Or, what to do, and what not to do.

Genetics

Carine E.L. Carels

Genetics and Genomics of Orofacial Clefting and Tooth Agenesis

Carine E.L. Carels

CV Prof. dr. Carine CARELS, DDS, PhD, hon fellow FDSRCS

  • Professor and Head Dept of Orthodontics, KU Leuven, Belgium, 1987-2008
  • Sabbatical Leave at Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands (to study Genetics and Molecular Life Sciences, Bachelor and Master Level), Academic Year 2008-2009
  • Professor of Orthodontics with emphasis on Dental and Facial Genetics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands (2010-2016)
  • Professor in the Department of Oral Health Sciences, KU Leuven, Belgium (2016-2017)
  • Professor in the Department of Human Genetics and of Oral Health Sciences, KU Leuven, Belgium (2017- now)

Abstract

Tooth agenesis and orofacial clefts both represent very common developmental anomalies and their co-occurrence is often reported in patients as well as in animal models. Here we aimed to perform a systematic review to thoroughly investigate the literature in order to identify genes and genomic loci contributing to syndromic or non-syndromic co-occurrence of tooth agenesis and orofacial clefts and to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying their dual involvement in the development of teeth and facial primordia. Altogether, 84 articles including phenotype and genotype description provided 9 genomic loci and 26 gene candidates underlying the co-occurrence of the two congenital defects: MSX1, PAX9, IRF6, TP63, KMT2D, KDM6A, SATB2, TBX22, TGFα, TGFβ3, TGFβR1, TGFβR2, FGF8, FGFR1, KISS1R, WNT3, WNT5A, CDH1, CHD7, AXIN2, TWIST1, BCOR, OFD1, PTCH1, PITX2 and PVRL1.
The molecular pathways, cellular functions, tissue-specific expression and disease association were investigated using publicly accessible databases (EntrezGene, UniProt, OMIM). The Gene Ontology terms of the biological processes mediated by the candidate genes were used to cluster them using the GOTermMapper (Lewis-Sigler Institute, Princeton University), speculating on six super-clusters: (a) anatomical development, (b) cell division, growth and motility, (c) cell metabolism and catabolism, (d) cell transport, (e) cell structure organization and (f) organ/system-specific processes.
This review aims to increase the knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the co-occurrence of tooth agenesis and orofacial clefts, to pave the way for improving targeted (prenatal) molecular diagnosis and finally to reflect on therapeutic or ultimately preventive strategies for these disabling conditions in the future.

Genetics

Tetsutaro Yamaguchi

Human Genetics in Malocclusion

Tetsutaro Yamaguchi

Professional Experience and Education

2019-prs Professor and chair, Department of Oral Interdisciplinary, Division of Orthodontics, Kanagawa Dental University Graduate School of Dentistry, Japan
2012-2019 Associate Professor, Division of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Japan
2007-2012 Assistant Professor, Division of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Japan
2004-2007 Research Associate, Division of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Japan
2000-2004 Clinical Researcher, Division of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Japan
1996-2000 Graduate School of Dentistry, Showa University, Ph.D., Orthodontics
1989-1995 School of Dentistry, Showa University, D.D.S., Dentistry

Honors and Awards

2018, 2017, 2015
The Japanese Society for Jaw Deformities, The Best Poster Presentation Award
2016, 2012, 2010, 2009, 2008
The Japanese Orthodontic Society, The Best Poster Presentation Award
2011 The Kamijo Grant Prize (Research), Showa University

Research Interests

Human genetics in orofacial disease and traits

Abstract

Malocclusion, an incorrect relationship between the maxilla and the mandible or a general misalignment of the teeth, is highly influenced by genetics. Genetic exploration of human craniofacial morphology, as morphological variation, began in 2001. In recent years, several genome-wide studies have surfaced that began with simple curiosity regarding the development and organization of the human face. Major contributions to progress in this area were made by researchers in various fields, including anatomy and human evolution, rather than by dentists. Explosive recent advances in genome science have identified genetic factors of malocclusion in humans. Research on the genetics of human mandibular prognathism was initiated in 2005; thereafter, it progressed by studying human genes with malocclusion as a phenotype.
Several important discoveries have been made, to date. Genes underlying congenital anomalies play important roles in the dentofacial variation in human malocclusion, even in healthy populations. Moreover, in genome-wide studies, genes with previously unknown functions were associated with human craniofacial morphology. Various phenotype classification and human genetic analysis, each having advantages and disadvantages, have been applied in relation to human genetics in malocclusion. With limitations in each method, the current status, based on associated literature, is difficult to report from the standpoint of reproducibility. In this context, considering everything that has been learned to date, what sort of progress in research will have to be made in future? What hopes and expectations are reasonable? To benefit clinical practice, prospective malocclusion research will be conducted by examining existing studies.

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