Program Information

Congress Schedule

A group of sessions will be released at 8:00am and 4:00pm in Japan Standard Time(JST) from October 4 to 6.

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All sessions in this time slot will be released at 8 am JST.

Biomechanics

Ravindra Nanda

Relevancy of Biomechanics in Clinical Orthodontics in 2020

Ravindra Nanda

Professional Experience and Education

1964 BDS, KGMC, Lucknow, India
1966 MDS, KGMC, Lucknow, India
1969 PhD, Nymegen, The Netherlands
1970 Assistant Professor, Loyola, Chicago
1972 Assistant Professor, University of Connecticut, Farmington
1992-2017 Head Department of Orthodontics, Univ. of Connecticut

Honors and Awards

2009 John Valentine Mershon Memorial Lecture, AAO, Boston
2010 Life time achievement Award, Univ. of Connecticu
2011 Sheldon Friel Memorial Lecture, EOS, Istanbul
2017 Orthodontic Legend award, CDABO, Orlando

Research Interests

Biomechanics and orthodontic appliances
Clinical trials
Acceleration of tooth movement

Abstract

Practice of clinical Orthodontics has significantly changed over the last three decades. Our customary work with wires and brackets since last century now includes use of skeletal anchorage devices, orthographic surgery without pre surgical orthodontics and use of sequential plastic aligners to correct malocclusions. However we are still seeking answers to how can we accelerate orthodontic tooth movement to finish treatment sooner. Numerous commercial devices have been promoted, some with spurious claims and others with less than desirable results.
For all the existing treatment modalities and newer methods such as aligners and mini screws, there is one common denominator and that is biomechanics. Without a clear understanding of forces and moments delivered by wires or aligners via brackets or mini screws, achieving predictable results would be impossible. With the popularity of aligners and other non traditional treatment methods it even becomes more important to understand how forces work and how to prevent side effects.

Biomechanics

Noriaki Yoshida

Smart and Visible Biomechanics - Optimizing treatment mechanics based on prediction strategy for long-term tooth movement

Noriaki Yoshida

Professional Experience and Education

1980-1986 DDS from Nagasaki University School of Dentistry, Japan
1990-2000 Assistant Professor, Department of Orthodontics, Nagasaki University School of Dentistry
1992-1994 Research fellow, Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Free University Berlin, Germany
1994 Research fellow, Humboldt University, Germany
2000-2001 Senior Assistant Professor, Department of Orthodontics, Nagasaki University School of Dentistry
2005 Visiting Professor, Orthodontics, Division of Craniofacial Sciences and Therapeutics, University of Southern California, USA
2001-present Professor and Chair, Department of Orthodontics, Nagasaki University School of Dentistry

Honors and Awards

1999 Encouragement Award, Japanese Society of Stomatognathic Function

Research Interests

Biomechanics
Clinical application of temporary anchorage devices
Development of stomatognathic function

Abstract

This presentation will deal with biomechanical solutions for maximizing therapeutic efficiency and minimizing side effects during orthodontic treatment. Although various treatment techniques have been developed, it remains quite difficult to predict or compare actual tooth movements subsequent to the application of different treatment mechanics. Therefore, the prediction and planning of orthodontic tooth movement have been largely dependent on clinical experiences. With such a background, the demand for simulating long-term tooth movement under the various treatment mechanics has been increasing to improve therapeutic efficiency and reduce the treatment time.
We developed a simulation system of long-term orthodontic tooth movement based on a bone remodeling algorithm using the finite element method. Using this system, the optimal loading condition for achieving speedy and controllable tooth movements can be determined.
The optimal loading condition on the application of sliding mechanics in combination with power arms during space closure in an extraction case will be described. Also for loop mechanics, a simple and innovative design of closing loop, which produces an optimal force magnitude and M/F ratio for en-masse retraction, and is applicable in the 0.022-in slot system, will be introduced.
Clinical application of temporary anchorage devices combined with the above mentioned mechanics will be also discussed.

The Smile

Sylvain Chamberland

Vertical Dimension and Facial Aesthetics

Sylvain Chamberland

Education

2008- M.Sc. degree, Laval University, Quebec city
1990- Certificate in Orthodontics, Montreal University, Montreal
1983- DDS degree, Laval University, Quebec city

Professional experience

1990 to date- Private practice in orthodontics, Quebec city
2009, 2014 to 2020- Guest lecturer at the AAO annual meeting
2015- Guest lecturer at Journee de l'Orthodontie Francaise, Paris
1991 to 2008- Clinical intructor and lecturer in orthodontics, DDS undergraduate program, Laval University, Quebec city
1984 to 1988- Clinical instructor in prosthodontics, DS undergraduate program, Laval University, Quebec city
1983 to 1988- Private practice in general dentistry, St-Damien, PQ.

Recognition

2017- Main speaker at the Congress of the German Orthodontic Society, Bonn, Germany
2014- The Brainerd F. Swain Award of Excellence for Best Paper presented at the annual Angle East meeting (Functional Genioplasty in Growing Patients)
2007- Member of the EHASO Eastern Component (membership process 2003 to 2006)
1997- Fellow of the Royal College of Dentist of Canada (FRCDC)
1995- Diplomate of the America Board of Orthodontics

Publication

Progressive idiopathic condylar resorption: Three case reports, AJODO 2019, 156:531-544
A la memoire de WIlliam R. Proffit, Orthod Fr, 2018, 89:323-326
Genioplastie fonctionnelle chez les patients en croissance, Ortho Fr, 2016, 87:175-188
Response to: Functional genioplasty in growing patients by Chamberland et al, 2015, 85, 6:1083
Functional genioplasty in growing patients, Angle Ortho, 2015, 85:360-373
Long-term dental and skeletal changes following SARPE, letter to the editor, OOOO 2013, 116: 120-121
Short-term and long-term stability of SARPE revisited, AJODO 2011, 139:815-822 e811.
Closer look at SARPE, JOMS 2008, 66:1895-1900

Research interest

Orthognatic surgery
TADs skeletal anchorage
TMJ arthritis, condylar resorption

Abstract

Patients with long anterior face height and anterior open bite often require a surgical approach to correct the vertical dimension. Temporary skeletal anchorage devices now offer the possibility of closing anterior open bite and reducing vertical dimension by intruding posterior teeth. Conversely, patients with reduced anterior facial height (short face syndrome) need elongation of the vertical dimension. In such case, orthognathic surgery is unavoidable if one wants to obtain normal vertical dimension. Review of the literature and case presentation will help to understand the biomechanics and treatment planning of these malocclusion.

Learning objectives

Attendees of this lecture will be able to:
1-Determine TADs placement to achieve intrusion of the buccal segment to close an open bite
2-Assess treatment goal to obtain normal vertical dimension
3-Understand mechanics to increase vertical dimension prior to orthognathic surgery for short face syndrome.

The Smile

Joseph P. Bouserhal

What about Adult Class II's: Some Thoughts...

Joseph P. Bouserhal

TITLES

  • Professor of Orthodontics and Research Lab Director, Saint Joseph University of Beirut, Lebanon
  • Adjunct Clinical Professor, Boston University, USA
  • Member, Angle Society of Orthodontists, East Component, USA
  • Member, Tweed Foundation for Orthodontic Education and Research, USA
  • Executive Committee Member, World Federation of Orthodontists

DEGREES

  • Doctor in Dental Surgery, Saint Joseph University of Beirut, Lebanon
  • Master Degree in Orthodontics, Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium
  • Doctorate Degree, University of Liege, Belgium
  • Diploma of Specialist in Lingual Orthodontics, Paris 7 University, France
  • Diploma in Dental Clinical Research, Toulouse University, France
  • Diploma in 3D Imaging, Toulouse University, France
  • Diploma in Sleep Dental Medicine, Paris 7 University, France

Abstract

Class II malocclusion is considered one of the most common problems to solve in orthodontics. Differential diagnosis constitutes the main pillar in addressing such deformations in order to be able to apply individualized therapeutic procedures.
Based on the above, each Class II has to be correctd differently and no cookbook to follow exists. A thinking classifying dento-alveolar, skeletal and soft tissue components as well as identifying maxillary from mandibular etiology has to be developed and applied.
This presentation will expose an Individualized Orthdontic Philosophy applied to Class II adult cases through differential diagnosis and individuallized treatment planning.

The Smile

Chris Chang

Gummy smile correction

Chris Chang

Dr. Chris Chang is the founder of Beethoven Orthodontic Center and Newton's A Inc. in Hsinchu, Taiwan. He received his PhD in Bone Physiology and Certificate in Orthodontics from Indiana University. He is a diplomate of the American Board of Orthodontics and an active member of Angle Society-Midwest. Dr. Chang is the publisher of Journal of Digital Orthodontics and has authored and co-authored many orthodontic books, including Orthodontics Vols. 1-6, as well as Words of Wisdom, Jobsology and Trumpology. He is the inventor of OrthoBoneScrews(OBS).

Abstract

Maxillary whole arch intrusion and retraction by Temporary Anchorage Devices (TADs) has been proved to be an effective way to improve the esthetics of gummy smile. This lecture will present the diagnosis and treatment planning of gummy smile. Detailed mechanics and screw insertion techniques will be introduced. The rationales for surgical crown lengthening to enhance the anterior esthetics will also be discussed.

Eruption Disorders

Inger M. Kjaer

Prediction and prevention of pathological tooth eruption

Inger M. Kjaer
2015-2020 Professor Emerita at the University of Copenhagen and Consultant in dental and craniofacial deviations at the University Hospital Copenhagen, Denmark
2002-2015 Professor at the Orthodontic Institute, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
1999 Doctoral theses in Medicine. University of Copenhagen
1998-2002 Vice Dean at the faculty of Medicine, University of Copenhagen,Denmark
1997-2004 Board member representing Medicine and Science at the Central Academic Council, University of Copenhagen
1997-2000 Council member in EOS, European Orthodontic Society
1994-1998 Member of the committee responsible for health educations in the Ministery of Education.
1986-2002 Associate Professor at the Orthodontic Institute, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
1983-2005 Chairman for the board responsible for the odontological specialties in the Ministry of Health, Denmark
1983 Doctoral theses in Odontology
1975-1986 Director for a municipal dental service unit offering general dental treatment and orthodontic treatment for 5000 children
1970-1975 Research scholarships in oral biology and histochemistry
1964-1970 DDS, Fellowship at the Medical Center, University of California, San Francisco US and postgraduate training in orthodontics, Copenhagen.

Honors and Awards

2002 The Queen of Denmarks Cross of the Order, Dannebrog.
2002 Honorary member of DORS, The Danish Orthodontic Association
2009 Honorary member of FSO, The Danish Association for Orthodontic Specialists

Research interest

Bridging Prenatal human development with Postnatal human development
Etiology-based dental and craniofacial diagnostics
Neuro-orthodontics. The interrelationship between neurology and orthodontics

Abstract

Scientific understanding of the normal eruption process is a prerequisite for an evidence-based prediction and prevention of pathological tooth eruption.

Normal tooth eruption occurs in three eruption phases:
1) Early migration of tooth buds
2) Pre-gingival penetration
3) Post- gingival penetration.

The biological eruption process is based on interactions between the highly innervated root membrane,the periodontal membrane (peri-root tissue layers),
and in phase 3 also of the penetration ability of the crown follicle.

The three tissue types important for eruption are: the mucosal ectoderm, the mesodermal ectomesenchyme and the neuroectodermal peripheral nerves.
The eruption process occurs in genetically different jaw segments (fields), each innervated by specific nerve branches originated from different areas on the neural crest.

Pathological tooth eruption of incisors, canines, premolars and molars will be demonstrated and categorized according to the three eruption phases.

Phase 1: prediction and prevention is not possible.
Phase 2: primary retention and ectopia can in many cases be predicted from anamnesis, diseases (virus attacks), and sometimes prevented.
Phase 3: secondary retention can sometimes be predicted , but rarely prevented.

Pathological tooth eruptions (all phases) occur nearly always in phenotypically "weak dentitions" with several other dental deviations (agenesis,

taurodontism,invaginations,abnormal resorptions,tooth malformations) and often in dentitions with impacted molars in the preceding primary dentition.

Screening the seemingly normal primary and permanent dentitions with "individualized diagnostics eyes" (citation from professor Takayuki Kuroda) is the most important first step in prediction and preventing pathological tooth eruption.

Eruption Disorders

Ewa M. Czochrowska

Trans-alveolar transplantation for impacted teeth: scientific evidence and clinical practice

Ewa M. Czochrowska

Graduated as a dentist from the Dental Faculty in Warsaw, Poland. She finished a postgraduate training in orthodontics at the University in Oslo, Norway in 1997 then worked as a Research Fellow at the Orthodontic Department, Dental Faculty in Oslo until 2002. In 2003 she was awarded a PhD from the University in Oslo for a thesis on autotransplantation of teeth. For the publication from this work she received the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics Dewel Orthodontic Award in 2002. In 2014 she was awarded a habilitation in medical science from the Medical University in Warsaw on her work related to orthodontic treatment of patients with periodontitis.

Dr. Czochrowska was the President of the European Orthodontic Society and she host the EOS Congress in 2014 in Warsaw. She is the President of the Polish Orthodontic Society and the Active Member of the Angle Society of Europe and the European Board of Orthodontists. At present, she serves the position of the Secretary of the Angle Society of Europe. Dr. Czochrowska has organized 2 international congresses on tooth transplantation in 2016 (Sopot, Poland) and 2018 (Rotterdam, the Netherlands). Received Distinguish Teacher Award from the European Orthodontic Society for 2020. At present in the private practice in Warsaw and is working at the Department of Orthodontics, Medical University in Warsaw, Poland.

Dr. Czochrowska has authored and coauthored 10 book chapters and 50 scientific articles. She has lectured extensively worldwide on tooth transplantation and orthodontic treatment in patients with periodontal diseases.

Abstract

Treatment options for impacted teeth are related to the stage of root development, inclination of the impacted tooth, space conditions, status of adjacent teeth and patient's attitudes to treatment. Trans-alveolar transplantation, which is a surgical uprighting of an ectopic tooth, is an attractive option and it is usually performed, when orthodontic extrusion is difficult and extraction of an impacted tooth and orthodontic space closure are unfavorable from orthodontic perspective.
The highest survival and success rates upon tooth transplantation were documented for developing teeth, preferably at 1/2 to 3/4 final root development. Gentle removal of a donor tooth is crucial for the successful outcome, but in severely impacted teeth transplantation may be more difficult and therefore less predictable. Detection of tooth impaction at earlier stages of root development is important, because shorter teeth are easier to be removed and those teeth have a better chance for pulp revascularisation. The existing evidence related to the survival and success of surgically uprighted teeth will be summarized.
Trans-alveolar transplantation can be used to surgically upright impacted developing premolars, canines and upper incisors and clinical examples will be shown during the presentation. Key factors for success will be discussed including treatment planning and surgical indications for the donor selection, surgical technique, follow-up protocol and long-term results. The important benefit of trans-alveolar transplantation of developing teeth is the potential for bone preservation and regeneration, that will be shown during the lecture.

Eruption Disorders

Stella Chaushu

Failures in treating impactions - hindsight is 20/20, so learn from your mistakes

Stella Chaushu

Professional Experience and Education

2014 Full Professor, Hebrew University, Hadassah School of Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel
2010 Chairperson, Hebrew University, Hadassah School of Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel
2010 PhD, Hebrew University, Hadassah School of Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel
2007 Associate Professor, Hebrew University, Hadassah School of Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel
2002 Clinical Senior lecturer, Hebrew University, Hadassah School of Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel
1999 Clinical Lecturer, Hebrew University, Hadassah School of Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel
1989 DMD, Hebrew University, Hadassah School of Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel
1989 MSc, Hebrew University, Hadassah School of Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel

Honors and Awards

1984 Dean award for academic accomplishments during the first year of study.
1985 Dean award for academic accomplishments during the second year of study.
1986 Dean award for academic accomplishments during the first, second and third year.
1987 Golda Meir award for MSc thesis.
1989 Melvin Fener award for academic accomplishments during the fifth year of study.
1989 Dean award for academic accomplishments during the six year of study.
2003 magna cum laude for DMD thesis of student under my supervision
2007 Excellence in teaching award for undergraduate students (Dean list).
2013 Excellence in teaching award for undergraduate students (Rector list).
2013 Best poster award in the International Orthodontic Postgraduate Study Day, Kings College London Orthodontic Society, London, for student under my supervision
2013 Best poster award in the European Orthodontic Society Congress, Reykjavik, for student under my supervision.
2014 Dr. Joseph E. Johnson Clinical Award in AAO convention, New Orleans for the best table clinic of student under my supervision.
2014 Excellence in teaching award for undergraduate students (Rector list).
2014 Dr. Baruch and Fani Kaufman award for excellent doctoral degree thesis of student under my supervision.
2014 Best oral presentation award in the European Orthodontic Society Congress, Warsaw, for student under my supervision.
2015 Hatton Unilever award for best oral presentation in IADR congress, Dubrovnik, for student under my supervision.
2015 IADR LION Dental Research Award for Junior Investigators for student under my supervision.
2015 Charley Schultz resident scholar award in the annual AAO meeting, San Francisco, for the best basic science research of student under my supervision.
2016 Dewel clinical research award for the best clinical paper in 2016 by the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
2016 Best Oral Presentation in SIDO conference, Florence, for student under my supervision.
2016 BSODR GSK MINTIG award in PER IADR conference, Jerusalem, for student under my supervision.
2016 European GCARE University Research Award for student under my supervision.
2018 Third Place for the Dentsply Sirona Awards for student under my supervision
2019 First prize in the Three Minute Thesis competition at the IADR AADR CADR General Session in Vancouver, for student under my supervision.
2019 IADR CTOR Award For Student Excellence in Orthodontics Research at the IADR AADR CADR General Session, Vancouver, for student under my supervision.

Research Interests

Orthodontic treatment of impacted teeth
Orthodontic treatment of adult patients
The biology and immunology of orthodontic tooth movement
Orthodontic tooth movement into regenerative sites
Orthodontic treatment of patients with disabilities

Abstract

Every orthodontist in the world can align teeth, but when the principle aim of treatment is treating an impacted tooth, it is all or nothing - we either succeed or fail, and it is nothing in-between. Many factors that are not present in routine orthodontics complicate the treatment. The tooth is not visible, therefore accurate diagnosis of its three-dimensional position and relation with adjacent teeth is often difficult. A reliable anchorage unit which allows the application of controlled directional forces with minimal side effects on the anchorage teeth must be build-up. Close cooperation between the orthodontist and the oral surgeon is mandatory for the success of this approach. Mistakes are related to all the aspects of treatment and are not uncommon even in the hands of experts. Failures lead to malpractice lawsuits. However, mistakes sometimes occur due to lack of awareness of the whole dental profession to a specific issue which has not yet been studied and published. This lecture will cover different aspects of treatment of impacted canines and incisors, from what contributes to success through to the reasons for and the circumvention of failure and discuss mistakes seen in hindsight and how to overcome them.

Early Treatment

Peter Ngan

Early treatment of Class III malocclusion with TADs

Peter Ngan

Dr. Peter Ngan is the Branson-Maddrell Endowed Professor and Chair in the Department of Orthodontics, West Virginia University School of Dentistry. Dr. Ngan is also an Honorary Professor in the Faculty of Dentistry at the University of Hong Kong and a Guest Professor at the Wuhan University School of Stomatology. Dr. Ngan holds a dental degree from Harvard University, School of Dental Medicine and Certificates in Orthodontics, Pediatric Dentistry and Hospital Dentistry from the University of Pennsylvania, School of Dental Medicine/ Children Hospital of Philadelphia. He is a member of the Angle East (Eastern Component of the Edward H. Angle Society). He is a Diplomate of the American Board of Orthodontics and a Diplomate of the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry. He was inducted as Fellow of the American College of Dentists (October, 2008), Fellow of the International College of Dentists (October 2010) and Fellow of the Pierre Fauchard Academy (May 2011). Dr. Ngan's research interest includes growth and development, biology of tooth movement, dentofacial orthopedics, orthodontic appliance therapy, oral implantology, orthodontic bonding systems and adult interdisciplinary treatment.

Abstract

Young patients with a Class III malocclusion and maxillary deficiency are treated primarily with facemasks. However, because the force is applied to the teeth, the inevitable mesial migration of the dentition can result in anterior crowding and the need for a subsequent extraction therapy. Furthermore, the desired skeletal effect of this commonly used approach often turns out to be less than expected. To increase the advancement of the maxilla, facemask therapy is often combined with rapid palatal expansion (RPE) since stimulation of the midface sutures is expected. Temporary Anchorage Devices (TADs) can be inserted in the palate to avoid mesial migration of the upper molars when using a facemask and to minimize tipping or periodontal damage to the bicuspids /deciduous molars when expanding the maxilla. The author will present early Class III cases treated with the help of TADs and the skeletal and dental changes one will expect with the use of this device. After this lecture, the attendees of this lecture will be able to identify the type of Class III patients suitable to be treated with facemask, RPE and TADs; identify the various factors such as growth pattern, growth potential and the severity of malocclusion that can affect the treatment outcome with this appliance; and learn how to design and fabricate RPE with TADs that can be used in conjunction with a facemask.

Early Treatment

James A. McNamara

Expansion in the early mixed dentition: Is it worth the effort?

James A. McNamara

Professional Experience

Thomas M and Doris Graber Endowed Professor Emeritus, Department of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry, and Research Professor Emeritus, Center for Human Growth and Development, the University of Michigan. Private practice of Orthodontics, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Education

Bachelor's degree in Speech, University of California Berkeley; Dental education and Certificate of Orthodontic Specialty, The University of California San Francisco. Master's and Doctorate in Anatomy, The University of Michigan.

Honors and Awards

Milo Hellman Research Award; American Association of Orthodontists, 1973; E. Sheldon Friel Memorial Award, European Orthodontic Society, 1979; Research Recognition Award, American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, 1983; James E Brophy Distinguished Service Award, the American Association of Orthodontists, Albert H. Ketcham Memorial Award, American Board of Orthodontics, 2008; Beni Solow Memorial Award, European Orthodontic Society, 2011; Edward H. Angle Memorial Lecturer, American Association of Orthodontists, 2014; Angle Heritage Award, Edward H Angle Society of Orthodontists, 2017.

Research Interests

Skeletal and dentoalveolar effects produced by orthodontic, orthopedic and surgical treatments; normal craniofacial growth and development; the Cervical Vertebral Maturation method of growth assessment.

Abstract

This presentation describes four decades of research carried out at the University of Michigan that consider the clinical alteration of the transverse dimension of the face, with specific attention given to orthodontic and orthopedic treatment of patients in the early mixed dentition. The results of a series of clinical studies will be described that consider the etiology of dental crowding as well as treatment effects produced by expansion in the early mixed dentition or in the late mixed/early permanent dentition.

A protocol for early treatment will be described that includes the removable lower Schwarz appliance (40% of mixed dentition patients who are in need of rapid maxillary expansion), a bonded acrylic splint expander (100% of such patients), and placement of "temporary" anterior brackets (60% of patients). A series of retrospective and prospective studies will be presented, including an investigation considering the spontaneous improvement of Class II malocclusion following increase in the transverse dimension. The possible negative effect of maintaining or increasing lower anterior arch length on subsequent lower second molar eruption or impaction also will be discussed.

The results of these studies support the concept that intervention in the early mixed dentition can produce many favorable changes in the occlusion as the dentition matures. An ideal time to intervene in such patients is before the onset of puberty.

Early Treatment

Letizia Perillo

Early treatment of dentoskeletal Class II malocclusion

Letizia Perillo

Professional Experience and Education

Letizia Perillo is full Professor and Dean of the School of Dentistry, Chairman of the NEBEOP Postgraduate Orthodontic Program, Head of the Orthodontic Division at Multidisciplinary Department of Medical-Surgical and Dental Specialties, University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, Naples. She is 2018-2020 Visiting Professor at University of Alexandria, Egypt, 2021 Elected President of the Italian Society of Orthodontics (SIDO), 2022 Elected President of the Mediterranean Orthodontic Integration Project (MOIP), 2018-2020 International Ambassador of the American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) for SIDO, Member of the WFO, AAO, EHASO, EOS, SIDO and CH Tweed Foundation (clinical instructor), and member of the Editorial Board of several orthodontic and dental journals. Prof Perillo graduated in Medicine and Surgery in 1986 and specialized in Orthodontics in 1989 at the University of Naples Federico II. She completed her orthodontic training with a postgraduate fellowship at the University of Michigan in 1993 and a PhD in Interceptive Orthodontics at the University of Florence in 1997.

Honors

  • Dean of the School of Dentistry, 2018-present
  • Postgraduate Orthodontic Program Director, 2008-present
  • Italian Orthodontic Society (SIDO) President, 2021
  • Mediterranean Orthodontic Integration Project (MOIP) President, 2022
  • American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) International Ambassador, 2018-2020
  • World Federation of Orthodontists (WFO) Representative, 2018-2019
  • Progress in Orthodontics (PIO) Associate Editor, 2017-present
  • EH Angle Society of Orthodontists (EHASO) North Atlantic Components, Member, 2014-present
  • CH Tweed International Foundation, Active member and Clinical instructor, 1999-present
  • European Orthodontic Society (EOS) Member, 1995-present

Awards

  • WJB Houston Poster Award: The association between the morphology of the upper arch and palate and buccally displaced maxillary canines in mixed dentition: a three-dimensional study. 94th EOS Congress. Edinburgh, UK, June 2018
  • Poster Prize: Universal three-dimensional reference system for craniofacial deformities. 6th MOIP Congress, Alexandria, Egypt, October 2018
  • Poster Prize: Descriptive superimposition of CBCT generated digital cast. 6th MOIP Congress. Alexandria, Egypt, October 2018
  • Oral Presentation Prize: Gingival crevicular fluid changes during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances: evaluation by vibrational spectroscopies. 6th MOIP Congress. Alexandria, Egypt, October 2018
  • Poster Prize F. Bruno: Association between 3D palatal morphology and upper arch dimensions in buccally displaced maxillary canines in mixed dentition. 49th SIDO. Florence, Italy, October 2018
  • Poster Prize: Association between 3D palatal morphology and upper arch dimensions in buccally displaced maxillary canines in mixed dentition. 49th SIDO Congress, Florence, October 2018
  • Poster Prize: Rapid and Mixed maxillary expansion: comparison on postero-anterior cephalograms and dental casts. 5th MOIP Congress, Limassol, Cyprus, November 2016
  • APOS Trends Award for the Best Reviewers. Bali, Indonesia, September 2016
  • Poster Prize: Early Class III treatment: RME/FM vs SEC III. SIDO Congress, Milan, October 2015
  • Oral Presentation Prize: Friction forces during sliding mechanics: in vitro comparison of conventional, Self-ligating and Low-friction brackets. SIDO Congress, Rome, March 2013

Research Interests

Her main research topics are early treatment, non-extraction treatment, cleft lip and palate, dentofacial orthopedics and genetics.

Abstract

One of the most heated controversies in Orthodontics concerns the role of early treatment in the correction of dentoskeletal Class II malocclusions by mandibular retrusion. Thus, a treatment for stimulating mandibular growth with functional appliances is often indicated. One of the most famous appliances is the Function Regulator (FR-2), proposed in the 1960s by Frankel. According to the literature, FR-2 treatment is able to correct a Class II malocclusion. However, some studies highlighted an increase in mandibular growth, others reported only restriction of maxillary growth or dentoalveolar effects. This lecture will show primarily the importance of the differential diagnosis in the treatment for dentoskeletal Class II malocclusions, and then the changes associated with the FR-2 treatment and their stability after a 20-year follow-up.

Interdisciplinary Treatment

Mithran S. Goonewardene

Interdisciplinary Management of Complex Dental Problems

Mithran S. Goonewardene

Mithran Goonewardene completed Dental School at The University of Western Australia in 1981 and attended the Forsyth Dental Center/Harvard School of Dental Medicine in Boston, USA from 1984-1987 where he completed his Certificate in Orthodontics and Master of Medical Science degree. He is Head of Orthodontics and Graduate Program Director at The University of Western Australia, is a full member of The Edward Angle Society of Orthodontists and is Certified by the Australian Orthodontic Board. He visits Sri Lanka regularly as a visiting Consultant in Orthodontics in the Dental Institute, Colombo and participates in part-time private practice in Perth.

Abstract

Interdisciplinary management of complex dental problems may be extremely rewarding for both the treating clinicians and patients. A rigorous systematic approach is necessary to develop a coordinated, patient centred, goal oriented treatment plan. It is critical to establish the needs of the individual patient within their own value system and establish a realistic plan. To achieve the best outcome, clinicians must establish a group of healthcare providers who will bring the necessary skills and knowledge to the interdisciplinary team. They must meet and communicate regularly and effectively through appropriate media. A sequence of activity with specific goals should be outlined, identifying the respective clinicians and their immediate goal, which all clinicians and the patient may refer to at any stage in treatment. The team leader has the responsibility of ensuring that the patient and clinicians are all cognizant of the stage that the patient has reached and what is performed next, in turn facilitating communication. If these processes are adhered to, then the patient and the team can anticipate a mutually rewarding experience with consistently excellent reproducible outcomes. Dr Goonewardene will outline strategies for managing and complex issues related to tooth loss, tooth wear, sleep disordered breathing and complex skeletal problems from an inter-disciplinary perspective. Special emphasis on how to facilitate complex 3 dimensional tooth movements using skeletal anchors will be discussed including application in the surgery first approach.

Interdisciplinary Treatment

Ute E.M. Schneider

Complex interdisciplinary adult treatments

Ute E.M. Schneider

DDS University of Mainz, Germany
MSc in Orthodontics University of Ferrara, Italy
Since 1987 Private practice in Bolzano, Italy
Member of WFO, AAO, SIDO, ASIO, AIdOr
Active Member of the EHASO (Edward H. Angle Society of Orthodontists - Angle East),
Diplomate of the Italian Board of Orthodontists (IBO)
Since 2011 Adjunct professor at the Department of Orthodontics, University of Ferrara
2012 President AIdOr
2019/20 President Angle East
2010 Brainerd Swain Award of Excellence EHASO
Research Interests:
Very early orthodontic treatment
Treatment efficiency
Interdisciplinary treatment

Abstract

Adults patients affected by severe dentoskeletal malocclusions, multiple missing teeth, and periodontal involvement, require a well-orchestrated interdisciplinary team approach. The primary goal is to provide the restorative specialist with the best possible preconditions for the definitive prosthodontic rehabilitation.
In order to achieve an occlusally, periodontally, restoratively and economically realistic outcome, all alternative treatment options must be thoroughly evaluated and discussed with the entire team and the patient before embarking on the journey of a complex interdisciplinary treatment. Without sufficient knowledge about the latest developments in the complementary dental specialties, and consequent execution of the preestablished therapeutic protocol treatment efficiency is suboptimal. Apart from a highly skilled team of professionals. continuous patient motivation has to be assured in order to achieve the predicted outcome. An array of clinical patients will be presented to illustrate patient and team management for the complex interdisciplinary orthodontic patient.

Interdisciplinary Treatment

Birte Melsen

Regeneration of degenerated dentitions, together we can

Birte Melsen
1964 DDS. Royal Dental College Aarhus Denmark
1971 Specialized in Orthodontics.
1974 Dr. Odont. At the University of Aarhus
1975-2012 Professor and Chairman of the Department of Orthodontics at The School of Dentistry, Aarhus University, Denmark.
1986-2020 Part-time in a private practice in Lubeck, Germany, limited to adult orthodontics.
2015- Visiting Professor NYU, New York, U.S
2014- Visiting professor Hannover Germany

SELECTED AWARDS AND HONORARY DEGREES

1984 Recipient of the Robert H.W. Strang Award in Orthodontics.
1997 Recipient of the American Association of Orthodontists Foundation, PARC.
1999 World SIDO prize, Rome, Italy.
1999 Recipient of the Ernest Sheldon Friel Memorial Award.
2000 Knighthood of Dannebrog, 1st Degree.
2005 Best Paper, European Journal of Orthodontics.
2009 Invited Presenter, Northcroft Memorial Lecture.
2011 Recipient of Gloria honorary doctorate the University of Krakow Polen
2012 Recipient of the Ryus Lecture Award, Coex Seoul, Korea
2013 Recipient of the Brainerd F. Swain Award of Excellence,US.
2017 Recipient Frankel Award German Orthodontic Society Bonn Germany
2018 Recipient of the Ketcham Award in Washington by AAO.
2018 Invited presenter of the H. Margolis Lecture Tuft University Boston
2018 Honorary member of the American University Beirut Libanon.
2019 Honorary president for the first World Orthodontic Biomechanic Symposium. Doha Qatar.

Professor Melsen has authored more than 400 publications in the fields of growth based on research of human autopsy material, bone biology and clinical studies. In recent years her interests have focused on the Skeletal Anchorage, Virtual Imaging and Adult Orthodontic Treatment.

Abstract

While malocclusions can generally be treated by orthodontists alone treatment of degenerated dentitions in adult patients are requiring collaboration of several colleagues, periodontologists and prosthodontists being the most frequently involved. Important is that all aspects of the problem list and the treatment plan is taken into consideration and discussed among the involved dentists and the patient before initiating any treatment. The expectations, the resources regarding time and economy of the patient have to be clear as has the fact that maintenance of the treatment results is required after treatment. The adult patients often demand an aesthetic smile and her/his problem is often far from the main problem. The need and the demand differ.
While there is no relationship between gingivitis and periodontitis in young patients maintenance of the health of the gingiva during an orthodontic treatment of adult or even elderly patients is crucial and the risk of periodontal damage should not be underestimated.
The introduction of TADs have had a significant impact, changing the perspective of orthodontics. In relation degenerated dentitions the TADS have been important in the regeneration of lost alveolar bone.
First and foremost is that the result of an orthodontic treatment being part of a reconstruction is an occlusion that is compatible with a normal function and therefore is maintainable.

Chairat Charoemratrote

Biomechanics innovation for Class III non-surgery

Chairat Charoemratrote

Education

1981-1987 DDS Chulalongkorn University, Thailand
1989-1991 M.Sc. (Orthodontics) Chulalongkorn University, Thailand
1998-2000 C.A.G.S. (Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics)
Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Boston University, USA
1996-2001 D.Sc.D. (Orthodontics) Boston University, USA

Professional experiences

1. Faculty of Dentistry, Prince of Songkla University

1987-1996 Lecturer
1996-2006 Assistant Professor
2006-present Associate Professor
2002-2010 Head of Department of Preventive Dentistry
2010-2011 Vice Dean for Administration

Research Interest

Biomechanics in Orthodontics

2011- 2019 Dean, Faculty of Dentistry, Prince of Songkla University

2. Thai Association of Orthodontists

2012-2014 President
2014-2016 President-Elect
2016-2018 President
2018-present Advisory board committee

3. Digital Dentistry Asssociation

2018-present President

Abstract

When Class III non-surgery is planned for the patients, upper and lower incisor positions and inclinations must be decided to indicate types of tooth movement. Subsequently, appropriate biomechanics is established. For the upper incisor, protraction and extrusion are the most often movements while retraction and intrusion are for the lower incisors. Many times, when mandibular rotations are favorable for reducing the concavity of the face, molar extrusion should be introduced. In this presentation, an innovative biomechanics system of upper incisor protraction with extrusion, lower incisor retraction with intrusion, and molar extrusion will be presented. Samples of cases will be introduced in details of clinical applications along with their biomechanics.

Yoon-Ah Kook

Efficient Non-Extraction Approach to Correct Class II Malocclusion

Yoon-Ah Kook

Dr. Kook is President of Korean Association of Orthodontists, the Dean of the Graduate School of Clinical Dental Science and the professor of the Orthodontic Department at Seoul St. Mary's Hospital. Currently, he is a Clinical Professor at Department of Orthodontics, Arizona School of Dentistry & Oral Health and Saint Louis Univ.

He has published about 100 articles in international peer-reviewed journals regarding corticotomy, arch form, CBCT, and arch form. He also published several book chapters.

Diplomate, American Board of Orthodontics

Abstract

purpose C-palatal appliance(MCPA) is a highly effective device, which can be easily placed and managed by orthodontists.
Scientific evidence demonstrated that the application of MCPA resulted in successful treatment outcomes by efficient molar distalization with a near-bodily movement. According to recent clinical research, effect of maxillary arch distalization related to eruption stage of second molars was evaluated. Moreover, maxillary posterior structures after distalization were evaluated after long-term retention period.
A creative and innovative approach for Class II correction using MCPA will be discussed including biomechanics and practical guidelines. Clinical pearls and a simple management of MCPA including step-by-step placement procedures with use of a digital jig will be presented.

Johnson Hsin-Chung Cheng

The smile esthetics of evidence-based research and clinical application

Johnson Hsin-Chung Cheng

Professor Johnson Cheng is the Immediate Past President of Taiwan Association of Orthodontists TAO (2017-2018) and the current dean and professor on College of Oral Medicine, Taipei Medical University. He has been the chairman and editor in chief of TAO Journal Committee (2013-2016). He graduated from school of dentistry, Taipei Medical University in 1983 and got Master degree and PhD from the same university in 1995 and 2008, respectively. He practiced in orthodontic department at his hospital and also engaged in teaching and research in his school of dentistry for over 25 years. His major researches were surface treatment of orthodontic TADs and high molecular orthodontic material, esthetic smile in orthodontics, efficient orthodontic treatment of anterior cross-bite, evidence based in orthodontics, etc. He has published over 300 different kinds of academic and clinical papers and been also invited to make lectures about his associated researches around the Asian countries and got an enthusiastic response.

Abstract

The clinical problems resolution and application of evidence-based information to patients have been much improved since the evidence-based medicine (EBM) developed in two decades. From the history development of EBM, the evidence-based dentistry (EBD) was severely behind than EBM. Most of dentistry remains in the "rule of thumb", representing a lack of scientific evidence, there is a great the improvement of space! For the orthodontics, the relevant discussion of EBD was emphasized only in recent years. This report will be presented first from the development and application of EBD, and then introduce the Cochrane Library website in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, consists of thousands have been systematic review evidence report on the steps to collect. My meta- analysis and clinical related researches of the smiling esthetic on orthodontic extraction will be described. I will also introduce the clinical application of my evidence-based researches and present lots of interesting clinical orthodontic cases in this report. Finally, I will take some home messages to the audiences about the clinical considerations of smiling esthetics on orthodontic extraction treatment.

Desmond Ong

Management strategies for compromised first permanent molars: An orthodontic perspective

Desmond Ong

Professional Experience and Education

2017- Present Clinical Academic in Orthodontics University of Queensland, School of Dentistry, Brisbane, Australia
2011- Present Private Practice in Orthodontics, Townsville, Australia
2008 Membership in Orthodontics, Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons
2006-2010 Private Practice in Orthodontics, Gold Coast, Australia
2006-2010 Senior Lecturer in Orthodontics University of Queensland, School of Dentistry, Brisbane, Australia
2005 Membership in Orthodontics, Royal College of Surgeons, Edinburgh
2005 MDSc (Orthodontics) University of Queensland, School of Dentistry, Brisbane, Australia
2000 BDSc (Hons) University of Queensland, School of Dentistry, Brisbane, Australia

Honors and Awards

2016 Raj Prasad Award (Australian Society of Orthodontists)
2006 Young Lecturer Award (Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons)
2000 Australian Society of Periodontology Medallion

Research Interests

3D Technology in Orthodontics
TADs
Autotransplantation

Abstract

Compromised first permanent molars are relatively common in the adolescent population due to caries and/or developmental defects. Compromised first permanent molars with poor long-term prognosis are commonly associated with both short and long-term clinical dilemmas.

Several management strategies are available for both children and adolescents, depending upon the stage of dental development and type of malocclusion. In the majority of situations, compromised first permanent molars can be removed in conjunction with comprehensive orthodontic treatment, with complete closure of the extraction space. Temporary anchorage devices (TADs) can be used to facilitate predictable closure of large first permanent molar extraction spaces, particularly in the lower arch.

Autotransplantation of unerupted third molars into compromised first permanent molar extraction sites does warrant serious consideration where the long-term prognosis of a tooth is questionable, suitable donor teeth at the ideal stage of root development are present and where restorative implant placement is not possible due to expected future facial growth and dentoalveolar change.

This presentation will discuss the important case-specific diagnostic information required to determine the most appropriate management strategy for an individual patient.

Tsang Tsang, Franklin She

Aggravation of gummy smile by straight wire mechanics and its management with or without orthognathic surgery up to 10 year follow-up

Tsang Tsang, Franklin She

Professional experience and education

2004-2019 Owner, The Smile Clinic Orthodontic Center Limited, Hong Kong
2002-2019 Part-time clinical Lecturer, The University of Hong Kong
2014 Biomechanics summer course, Italy
1999-2002 Master in Orthodontics, The University of Hong Kong

Research interest

Bone biology
Orthodontics camouflage of dentofacial deformites
TADs and Segmented arch technique

Abstract

Two female patients presented with gummy smile, maxillary dentoalveolar protrusion and total vertical maxillary excess, retroclined incisors, and increased overbite received orthodontic camouflage with straight wire mechanics by general dentists. The treatments caused severe bowing of upper occlusal plane which aggravated the gummy smile and had led them to seek specialist care. They were successfully managed by orthodontic camouflage and combined surgical orthodontic treatment, respectively, in conjunction with the application of miniscrews on straight wire mechanics. Aggravation of gummy smile by straight wire mechanics, use of visual treatment objective to differentiate between orthodontic camouflage and surgical cases, and LeFort I segmentalization were discussed.

Junichiro Iida

Effectiveness of myofunctional therapy in orthodontic treatment and its scientific background

Junichiro Iida

Professional Experience and Education

2016-present Professor Emeritus Hokkaido University, Japan
2016-2019 Specially Appointed Professor and Chairman, Faculty of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Japan
1999-2016 Professor and Chairman, Department of Orthodontics, Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Japan
1995-1999 Associate Professor, Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan
1992-1995 Lecturer, Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan
1982-1992 Assistant Professor, Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan
1978-1982 Graduate School of Dentistry, (Ph.D. course of Orthodontics) Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan
1972-1978 School of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan

Honors and Awards

2015 Ryus Lecture Award, Korean Association of Orthodontists
1988 Hatton Award Competition, First Prize of Post-Doctoral Category, International Association for Dental Research
1978 Nagao Academic Award, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan

Research Interests

Biological background of orthodontic tooth movement
Muscular functions around the mouth
Research regarding jaw deformities
Research related cleft lip and palate patients

Abstract

Relapse of malocclusion after orthodontic treatment can be considered as the phenomenon of new malocclusion occurring after active orthodontic treatment due to failure of complete elimination of the cause of malocclusion. Force applied to teeth from the lips, tongue or cheek is thought to be one of the major factors responsible for the relapse of malocclusion. The research that we have been doing suggests that weak continuous forces applied from surrounding soft tissues to teeth possibly play the major role in changes of the position of the teeth.
From these considerations, I think it is very important to pay attention to the force that is applied to the teeth from surrounding soft tissues when deciding the treatment goal regarding the position of the teeth before the start of orthodontic treatment and also when the retention period starts.
On the other hand, myofunctional therapy is recommended for patients with abnormality in the position or in the movements of the tongue or lips, and much interest has been shown in methods used for and effects of myofunctional therapy.
We have focused on patients with lip incompetence and have carried out research on the pathophysiological conditions of patients with lip incompetence and the effectiveness of myofunctional therapy for these patients as well as research on appropriate training methods. I would like to introduce the results of our research and the scientific background of myofunctional therapy in this presentation.

Allied Health Professional Program: Clinical Practice and Support Staff

(1): Myofunctional Therapy

(2): New Digital Technology in orthodontic clinic

Clinical Practice and Support Staff (1):Myofunctional Therapy

Takashi Nezu

Awareness Training and Myofunctional Therapy in Orthodontics

Takashi Nezu

Professional Experience and Education

2013-2020 The deputy director and Clinical chief, Nezu Orthodontic Clinic, Japan
2010-2013 An associate doctor, Nezu Orthodontic Clinic, Japan
2009 Completion of Graduate School of Dentistry at TDC to obtain PhD
2009 Completion of postgraduate course at Orthodontic Department, Tokyo Dental College, Japan
2005 DDS, Tokyo Dental College, Japan

Research Interests

Diagnosis and Treatment of Dysfunction in Orthodontics
Treatment planning in Orthodontics
Treatment of High Degree of Difficulty Cases

Abstract

Malocclusion is not merely caused by morphological anomalies and/or improper eruption of teeth, but it is closely related to dysfunctional problems. In addition, diagnosis and training of dysfunctions such as various oral habits etc. are extremely important in executing orthodontic treatment properly. Particularly, in the high degree of difficulty cases, both morphological correction with mechanics and functional training of the patients is quite necessary.

Unlocking of malocclusion includes mechanical unlocking, which is morphological correction with mechanics, and functional unlocking, which is neutralizing various dysfunction to release from restricted environment (locking), and to restore the health of the orofacial structure including the TMJ. During growth, it refers to induce normal growth and development.

To improve dysfunctional problems and to reduce their influence on development of malocclusion, functional unlocking consists of Awareness Training (AT) to every patient including Myofunctional Therapy (MFT).
AT is to point out the effects of dysfunctions that patients are sometimes not aware of daily, and to understand the causal relationship with malocclusion, and to finally change their behavior. Patients without any exceptions need breathing/swallowing, muscles, posture and habit training. We identify the relevance and conduct individual training procedures to each case.

In our practice, we share the information and the need for training with patients through precise clinical examination, ordinary diagnostic materials and other data from implemented technologies, such as rhinomanometry and electromyograms. In this presentation, I am going to illustrate the why and the how of our functional training.

Clinical Practice and Support Staff (2): New Digital Technology in orthodontic clinic

Tatsuya Kosaka

What changes are caused by digital technology in the orthodontic field?

Tatsuya Kosaka

Professional Experience and Education

2018- Director, Kosaka Orthodontic Office
2014- Part-time Faculty, Department of Orthodontics, Tokyo dental college
2013-2018 Deputy Director, Kosaka Orthodontic Office
2007-2013 Assistant Professor, Division of Orthodontics, Department of Clinical Oral Health Science, Tokyo Dental College-Suidobashi Hospital
2006-2007 Hospital Resident, Department of Orthodontics, Tokyo Dental college-Chiba Hospital
2006.03 PhD, Tokyo Dental college, Doctor's Course, Completed
2001-2003 Postgraduate training course at the Department of Orthodontics, Tokyo Dental College
2001.03 DDS, Tokyo Dental College Graduated

Research Interests

3D analysis of masticatory movement, Straight-Wire technique

Abstract

Social life has undergone large-scale transformations with the development of digital technology in recent years. These changes are accelerating day by day, with developments in both hardware and software taking place. One advantage of digitalization is the systematic consolidation and organization of large amounts of information, a change that has dramatically enhanced operational efficiency. In the medical field, digitalization has been accompanied by the increased use of keywords such as "3D," "automatization," and "network." The field of orthodontics is currently witnessing a major revolution in diagnosis and treatment as a result of the utilization of digital tools such as CBCT and intraoral scanners. This study explores the effects of digitalization at the levels of research, clinical care, and the operations of clinics respectively, and discusses the future prospects of orthodontic treatment.

Temporary Anchorage Devices

Temporary Anchorage Devices

Mitsuru Motoyoshi

Safety placement of orthodontic anchoring screws

Mitsuru Motoyoshi

Professional Experience and Education

2018 Professor and Chair, Department of Orthodontics, Nihon University School of Dentistry, Japan
2009 Associate Professor, Department of Orthodontics, Nihon University School of Dentistry
2004 Assistant Professor, Department of Orthodontics, Nihon University School of Dentistry
1996 Visiting researcher, Alabama University in Birmingham, AL, USA
1984 DDS, Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo

Honors and Awards

Outstanding Presentation Award, Japanese Orthodontic Society, 2014, 2015, 2017.
Outstanding Presentation Award, Japan Implant Orthodontic Conference 2016.

Research Interests

Basis and Clinical Practice of Orthodontic Anchoring Screws

Abstract

Orthodontic treatment has been advanced by the use of orthodontic anchoring screws (OASs); however, OASs are occasionally loosened during treatment. We then investigated the risk factors for failure of OASs to improve the success rate, and found that the primary stability of OASs is related to the mechanical characteristics of the interface between the OASs and bone in relation to factors such as bone quality and quantity, screw design, placement torque, age, gender and placement site. In this presentation, certain and safety placement techniques for improving the success rate will be discussed in the search for the risk factors for failure.
On the other hand, physical knowledge and comprehension are required for realizing the effective tooth movement using OASs. Mechanics for effective tooth movement will be then also discussed using OASs placed into buccal alveolar bone and palate in this presentation.
Skeletal anchorage plates are used to distalize the entire dental arch. However, surgery is needed to place the anchorage plate, and this places a considerable burden on the patient. For this reason, OASs are frequently placed in the palatal bone instead of the anchorage plate. Palatal OASs are placed in the palatal alveolar bone, median palate, and so on, making it possible to avoid root contact. Also, the stiff palatal bone enables stable placement of palatal OASs. I would like to examine the effect of palatal OASs on tooth movement and the optimum placement technique in terms of safety.

Temporary Anchorage Devices

Junji Sugawara

How has skeletal anchorage changed the orthodontic strategies for Class III correction in adults?

Junji Sugawara

Professional Experience and Education

2017-2019 Director, Department of IDT, Sendai Aoba Clinic, Japan
2007-2016 Director, Department of Orthodontics, sendai Aoba Clinic, Japan
2006-2019 Visiting Clinical Professor, Department of Orthodontics, University of Connecticut, USA
1991-2006 Associate Professor, Department of Orthodontics, Tohoku University Graduate School of Dentistry, Japan
1989-1991 Instructor, Department of Orthodontics, Tohoku University Graduate School of Dentistry, Japan
1973-1998 Assistant Professor, Department of Orthodontics, Tohoku University Graduate School of Dentistry, Japan
1981 DDSc, Tohoku University, Japan

Honors and Awards

2013 The Vasavi Memorial Oration, The Indian Orthodontic Conference
2011 The Northcroft Memorial Lecture, The British Orthodontic Conference
2007 The BF and Helen E Dewel Research Award, AJO-DO
2005 The World Champion Lecturer Representing The Central and Eastern Asia, The 6th International Orthodontic Congress

Research Interests

Temporary Anchorage Devices

Abstract

The Skeletal Anchorage System (SAS) consists of titanium orthodontic anchor plates and monocortical screws that are temporarily implanted in the zygomatic buttress or the mandibular body, or in both, as absolute orthodontic anchorages. The most distinguished feature of SAS is enables us to predictably move molars. The SAS mechanics has revolutionized the concept of orthodontic and orthognathic treatment for adult patients. In this conference, I will focus on Class III patients and discuss how the strategies for Class III correction were changed following the development of SAS. Firstly, it became possible to effectively camoufalge severe Class III maloclusion in adults by distalization of the mandibular molars and/or entire dentition. Secondly, thanks to the development of SAS, it became possible to eliminate or shorten pre-surgical orthodontic treatment and significantly reduce total treatment time in Class III surgical cases. Thirdly, in moderate or severe growing Class III patients, SAS is an extremely effective biomechanics for solving various problems in the second phase treatment. Therefore, the second phase treatment for non-growing patients became more important than the first phase treatment. Thus, nowadays, the SAS becomes an indispensable modality for correction of any Class III malocclusions in my clinical practice.

Facial Esthetics

Carroll Ann E. Trotman

The Power of the Face: Restoring Function after Paralysis and Impairment

Carroll Ann E. Trotman

Dr. Trotman is the Associate Dean for Faculty Development and Professor and Chair of Orthodontics. She received her dental degree from Dundee University, Scotland and her orthodontic degree and MA in Oral Biology from Columbia University, NY. She then completed a Fellowship in Craniofacial Anomalies at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. Subsequently, she was appointed Assistant Professor in the Department of Orthodontics at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry. During her tenure at Michigan, she obtained an MS in Clinical Research Design and Statistical Analysis from the Horace Rackham School of Graduate Studies. Dr. Trotman then was appointed Associate Professor in the Department of Orthodontics at the University of North Carolina (UNC) School of Dentistry. Subsequently, she was promoted to Professor and served as the Interim Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and then Assistant Dean for Graduate Education at UNC. She then was appointed Professor and Associate Dean for Academic and Student Affairs at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry. Dr. Trotman was an American Council on Education Fellow, is a Diplomate of the American Board of Orthodontics, and maintains an active research program funded by NIH with a focus on craniofacial anomalies. Learn more about the Facial Animation Laboratory here.

Abstract

Patients with facial disability have varying degrees of impaired facial soft tissue movements/function and disfigurement. Surgeons have different treatments that attempt to correct the disability. This presentation will focus on approaches to quantify facial disability and assess treatment outcomes in patients with facial paralysis. Method: Longitudinal 3D changes in facial soft tissue movements were quantified in adults with unilateral facial paralysis (n=36) during different facial animations/movements, and in an age- and sex-frequency matched control group (n=68). Mean group measurements of displacement, velocity and asymmetry of movement were computed. Standard statistical tests were used to test for significant changes over time in the patient group and differences between the patients and controls. Also, 3D dynamic modeling and vector plots (mapping) were computed to isolate patients' abnormal movements compared with the controls. Results: The patients' mean baseline movements were significantly less for both the paralyzed and contralateral sides of the face with much greater movement asymmetry than the controls. Patients' mean measures improved significantly from baseline to 12 weeks, but still fell short of control values. Conclusion: In unilateral facial paralysis, the contralateral facial side was affected by the paralysis and may be tethered or limited in its movement by the paralyzed side. The measures and mapping effectively isolated paralyzed facial regions and tracked patient recovery, and has applications for facial reanimation surgery. A similar approach for diagnosis and outcome assessment will be briefly presented for patients with repaired cleft lip/palate.

Facial Esthetics

David M. Sarver

Macro to Mini-Explore the Possibilities David M. Sarver, DMD, MS Birmingham, Alabama

David M. Sarver

Dr. Sarver received his DMD from The University of Alabama School of Dentistry and MS in Orthodontics from the University of North Carolina in 1979. He is a Diplomate of the American Board of Orthodontics, a member of the Edward H. Angle Society of Orthodontists, a Fellow in both the International and American Colleges of Dentists and is a Fellow in the American Academy of Esthetic Dentistry. He has had the honor of presenting the Salzmann, Merson and Angle lectures at the AAO Annual meeting. In addition to his private practice, Dr. Sarvers book, Esthetics in Orthodontics and Orthognathic Surgery was published in September 1998. He is also coauthor, with Dr. Proffit and White, of the surgical text Contemporary Treatment of Dentofacial Deformity, and is coauthor the 4th, 5th editions and 6th edition of Proffits classic textbook Contemporary Orthodontics. Publication of his book Dentofacial Esthetics, from Macro to Mini is scheduled to be published in February. He has given more than 400 professional presentations in the United States, Europe, Australia and the Middle and Far East.

Abstract

The concepts in Macroesthetics to Microesthetics evaluates each patient who walks through your door focusing first on the big picture and then working your way to the minute details in order to treatment plan for the best possible outcome, taking into consideration concepts like esthetic balance and smile projection. Dr Sarver will demonstrate the idea that orthodontics is about more than occlusal function, it is about creating faces and smiles that are functional and beautiful.

Periodontal Considerations

Periodontal Considerations

Chun-Hsi Chung

Periodontal Considerations in Orthodontic Treatment

Chun-Hsi Chung

Professional Experience and Education

2011-present Chairman, Department of Orthodontics, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, USA
2003-present Associate Professor, Department of Orthodontics, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, USA
2017-present Postdoctoral Program Director, Department of Orthodontics, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, USA
2017-2018 President, The American Board of Orthodontics
2010-2018 Director, The American Board of Orthodontics
2010-2015 Postdoctoral Program Director, Department of Orthodontics, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, USA
1996-2003 Assistant Professor, Department of Orthodontics, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, USA
1992-2007 Clinical Director, Department of Orthodontics, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine
1992-1996 Lecturer, Department of Orthodontics, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, USA
1992 Orthodontic Certificate, Department of Orthodontics, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, USA
1992 MS, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, USA
1986 DMD, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, USA

Honors and Awards

2018 The American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) Award- 2018 AAO Annual Session Doctors Program Co-chair
2006 The Orthodontic Faculty Development Fellowship Award- The American Association of Orthodontists Foundation
2000 The Orthodontic Faculty Development Fellowship Award- The American Association of Orthodontists Foundation
1997 The University of Pennsylvania Research Foundation Award
1991 The Research Award, Department of Orthodontics, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, USA

Research Interests

Craniofacial Growth and Development
Rapid Palatal Expansion
Adult Orthodontics
3D Imaging in Orthodontics

Abstract

Although periodontal implications of orthodontic treatment are well-understood, undesired consequences such as gingival recession, bone dehiscence, and fenestration are still commonly observed. Literature shows that there are anatomic and periodontal boundaries that limit the amount of acceptable tooth movement. In planning orthodontic treatment, it is important to consider periodontal susceptibility, gingival phenotype and morphology of alveolar bone. CBCT imaging is very useful in diagnosing maxillary and mandibular transverse skeletal dimensions, thickness of buccal or lingual bone, and buccolingual inclination of each tooth. Nowadays non-extraction modality has become popular in the treatment of crowded dentition with either traditional bracket systems or clear aligners. However, significant dental arch expansion and incisal proclination often take place, which may result in gingival recession and/or bone dehiscence. Extraction therapy sometimes is necessary to reposition the teeth in the center of the alveolar bone so the periodontal condition can be improved. For certain patients, soft tissue grafting and/or corticotomy in conjunction with bone grafting would be needed. To avoid excessive dental expansion, rapid palatal expansion with TADs can be attempted on young adults to treat narrow maxilla. However, for older adults surgically-assisted rapid palatal expansion or Le Fort 1 osteotomy would be required. In this presentation, the periodontics-orthodontics interdisciplinary treatment approach to maintain the periodontal integrity, minimize future periodontal concerns, and allow efficient orthodontic treatment will be delineated.

Class II Treatment

Class II Treatment

Lorenzo Franchi

Patient-dependent factors for the efficient treatment of Class II malocclusion

Lorenzo Franchi

Professional Experience and Education

2019- Dean of the School of Dentistry, University of Florence
2018-2019 Associate Professor, Section of Dentistry, Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, The University of Florence, Florence, Italy
2006-2018 Assistant Professor, Section of Dentistry, Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, The University of Florence, Florence, Italy
2001-2019 T.M. Graber Visiting Scholar, Department of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Honors and Awards

2003 Edward Angle and Angle Society Award for Excellence in Orthodontic Research, Best Scientific Paper 2001-03 - Baccetti T., Franchi L., Cameron C.G., McNamara J. A. Jr. Treatment timing for rapid maxillary expansion. The Angle Orthodontist, vol. 71, n.5, pp. 343-350, 2001.
2006 Best Table Clinic, Joseph E. Johnson Table Clinic Award 106 Annual Meeting of the American Association of Orthodontists, Las Vegas, USA, 5-9 May, 2006.
2011 WJB Houston Award for the Best oral research presentation (Co-Author), European Orthodontic Society, Istanbul, June 2011
2014 WJB Houston Award for the Best oral research presentation (Co-Author), European Orthodontic Society, Warsaw, June 2014
2016 Dr Stephen Seward Lecture titled Pathways of Effectiveness in the Orthopedic Treatment of Class II malocclusion, 25th Australian Orthodontic Congress, Melbourne, Australia, February 20th, 2016.

Research Interests

Dentofacial Orthopedics
Growth modification
Biomechanics

Abstract

This lecture will illustrate patient-related factors that potentially can improve the efficacy of Class II treatment. Two such factors will be discussed: 1) timing of treatment, defined on the basis of reliable indicators of individual skeletal maturity, and 2) individual patient responsiveness.
Functional appliances used for the treatment of Class II malocclusion are effective in altering short-and long-term mandibular growth and mandibular sagittal position if active treatment includes the pubertal growth spurt. To predict individual patient responsiveness, mandibular morphology should be evaluated at puberty. Good responders to functional jaw orthopedics (FJO) for the treatment of Class II malocclusion associated with mandibular retrusion are characterized by a small mandibular angle.

Edgewise Appliance

Edgewise Appliance

Yves G Bolender

Is there any difference between conventional, passive self-ligating and active self-ligating brackets? A systematic review of the literature and network meta-analysis.

Yves G Bolender

Professional Experience and Education

2017 Chairman of the Department of Dento-facial Orthopedics, Faculty of Dental Surgery, University of Strasbourg, France.
2014 Director of the post-doctoral program in Orthodontics, Faculty of Dental Surgery, University of Strasbourg, France.
2012-present Associate Professor, Department of Dento-Facial Orthopedics, Faculty of Dental Surgery, University of Strasbourg, France.
2008-2012 Associate Professor, Department of Dento-Facial Orthopedics, Faculty of Odontology, University of Lorraine, Nancy, France.
2008 Full member of the Eastern Component of the Edward H. Angle Society of Orthodontists.
2008 PhD in Materials Science, Faculty of Science, University of Lorraine, Nancy, France.
1988 Master of Medical Sciences, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA.
1988 Certificate in Orthodontics, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Forsyth Dental Center, Boston, USA.
1983 DDS, Faculty of Dental Surgery, University of Strasbourg, France.

Honors and Awards

2016 Brainerd F. Swain Award of Excellence, Eastern Component of the Edward H. Angle Society of Orthodontists, Boston, MA meeting.
2009 Brainerd F. Swain Award of Excellence, Eastern Component of the Edward H. Angle Society of Orthodontists, Newport, RI meeting.
2003 Diplomate of the American Board of Orthodontics.

Research Interests

Evidence-based orthodontics. Materials science. Esthetics.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION : Self-ligating brackets are still being actively promoted by their respective distributors. What are the advantages to use these brackets in light of the existing literature ?
AIM: This review aims to test the null hypothesis that there is no difference in treatment efficiency between therapies undertaken with conventional, passive self-ligating or active self-ligating brackets. Most published reviews have pooled passive and active self-ligating brackets together, and compared the amalgamated self-ligating brackets to conventional brackets. By contrast this network meta-analysis compares two by two the three different bracket types: conventional, passive self-ligating and active self-ligating brackets.
MATERIAL AND METHOD:
An electronic search was performed in 3 databases (Pubmed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library) from their origin up to September 2018. Additional references were hand searched. Search was strictly restricted to randomized controlled trials and split-mouth design studies. A network meta-analysis was implemented to obtain multiple comparisons between therapies undertaken with the 3 bracket types. 51 variables which investigated the following items were analyzed: treatment duration, number of visits, alignment efficiency, rate of space closure, anchorage loss, perception of discomfort during the initial phase of treatment, pain experience during wire insertion or removal, time to ligate in or to untie an archwire, bonding failures, occlusal indices, transverse arch dimensional changes, incisor position modification with and without extractions, , root resorption, periodontal outcomes and finally oral health-related quality of life.

All sessions in this time slot will be released at 4 pm JST.
Opening Ceremony
WFO Keynote Lecture

WFO Keynote Lecture

Takayuki Kuroda

Evidence-based Orthodontic Treatment: What Is the Evidence?

Takayuki Kuroda

Professional education

  • Faculty of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University. D.D.S., 1961
  • Graduate School, Faculty of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, PhD. 1965

Academic Appointment

  • Associate Professor, Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1974~1981
  • Professor & Chairman, Second Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental university, 1981~1999
  • Professor & Chairman, Maxillofacial Orthognathics, Department of Maxillofacial Reconstruction and Function, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1999~2002
  • Professor Emeritus, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2002~Present
  • Research Associate, Department of Orthodontics, The Royal Dental College Copenhagen, 1966~1967
  • Research Associate, The Center for Human Growth and Development, University of Michigan, 1969~1970

Academic Activity

Japanese Orthodontic Society Honorary Member (Past Board Member)
Japanese Association of Cleft Lip and Palate Honorary Member (Past President)
Japanese Association for Jaw Deformity Honorary Member (Past President)
Japanese Association for Dental Research (JADR) Life Member (Past President)
International Association for Dental Research (IADR) Life Member (Past President)
World Federation of Orthodontists (WFO) Honorary Fellow
Charles H. Tweed International Foundation for Orthodontic Research     Honorary Academic Fellowship

Award

  • President Award of Japanese Association for Dental Science    2000
  • Louis Ada Jarabak Memorial International Teacher and Research Award, American Association of Orthodontists    2010
  • The order of the Sacred Treasure, Gold Rays with Neck Ribbon, Japanese Emperor    2016

Abstract

Irregularities of the teeth and unacceptable facial appearance have been human concerns since the Greek and Roman periods. The word “orthodontics” was first used in a book published in the late 18th century by Pierre Fauchard. Norman Kingsley published a book entitled “Treatise of oral deformities as a branch of mechanical surgery” in 1880 in which he introduced the mechanics of tooth movement and its biological tissue reaction. More recently, Edward Angle had a great influence on modern orthodontics. While orthodontic clinical treatment has been built on these and other forefathers, patient care in 2020 and beyond demands more than historical precedent.

Currently the terms “evidence-based orthodontics” and “evidence-based treatment” are often used in orthodontic clinical and research publications to validate a particular therapeutic approach. What is the actual “evidence” for what we do as orthodontists and where does it come from? Development of knowledge in the areas of molecular biology, craniofacial growth and development, histological tissue reaction, dental materials, as well as the improved use of statistics have supported the current theoretical basis for orthodontic treatment. As a result, there has been increased development of technical procedures for patient care.

Looking to the future, we need to focus on individual patient variables by better monitoring differences in the biological and psycho-social backgrounds among patients. Future clinicians considering orthodontic treatment planning will need to cultivate an “individualized diagnostic eye,” based on improved understanding of more broadly based and identified patient characteristics.