Program Information

Congress Schedule

A group of sessions will be released at 8:00am and 4:00pm in Japan Standard Time(JST) from October 4 to 6.

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All sessions in this time slot will be released at 8 am JST.

Accelerated Tooth Movement

M. Ali Darendeliler

How can we accelerate tooth movement? Do we need external Aids ?

M. Ali Darendeliler

Dr Darendeliler is Professor and Chair of Orthodontic, Discipline of Orthodontics, at the University of Sydney and Head of Department, Orthodontics, Sydney Dental Hospital, Sydney South West Area Health Service. He received his dentistry training from the University of Istanbul and his PhD from the University of Gazi, in Turkey and his first specialist training in orthodontics from the University of Geneva, Switzerland and his second specialist training from the High Education Council, Turkey. During the course of his career he has undertaken duties as a clinical instructor, research and postgraduate coordinator (Maitre d'Assisstant et de Recherche) at the University of Geneva, Assistant Professor at the University of North Carolina, Research Professor at the University of Southern California. Dr Darendeliler has been recognized for his efforts with multiple prizes including the Sheldon Friel Award, the highest recognition from the European Orthodontic Society, the Begg Award, the highest research award from the Australian Society of Orthodontists, and the Huston award for best research from the European Orthodontic Society. His research interests include orthodontic tooth movement, root resorption, obstructive sleep apnoea, temporary anchorage devices, sequential aligners, self-ligating brackets, orthopaedic treatment modalities, accelerated tooth movement, magnetic fields and forces and dentofacial orthopedics. He lectured in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia. In addition to his research and teaching commitments he also maintains a private specialist orthodontic practice.

Abstract

Clinicians have been looking at the ways of accelerating tooth movement for several reasons: Patient's demand due to increase in number of adult patients, to avoid problems related to treatment duration such as demineralization, periodontal issues and root resorption, to increase the productivity, profitability and efficiency, to have better anchorage control and to differentiate themselves from other practitioners. Several methods were used to accelerate tooth movement however the benefits of the methods used have to be looked at in terms of side effects and clinical significance. The only way to accelerate the orthodontic tooth movement is to accelerate bone resorption via biological response from the periodontal ligament as a result of mechanical loading. In fact the question to be asked is: Accelerated bone resorption; What is the evidence? Several methods, drugs and external stimuli were tested over the years and most of these were promoted by companies usually with little or no evidence. The lecture will address all available methods used to accelerate orthodontic tooth movement and will discuss their validity based on evidence.

Accelerated Tooth Movement

Martyn T. Cobourne

Adjuncts to orthodontic tooth movement. Are they really worth the bother?

Martyn T. Cobourne

Martyn Cobourne is Professor and Head of Orthodontics at Kings College London and Honorary Consultant in Orthodontics at Guys and St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust. His research is primarily focused on investigating the role of molecular signaling pathways during early craniofacial development. However, he is also interested in the effectiveness of contemporary orthodontic treatment and has led a number of multi-centre clinical trials investigating treatment efficiency. His clinical research won the B. F. and Helen E. Dewel Award of the American Association of Orthodontists in 2019. He has published over 145 peer-reviewed articles and is the author of two successful orthodontic textbooks. He was Director of Research at the British Orthodontic Society between 2012 and 2016 and is currently Editor in Chief of the Journal of Orthodontics. He is an elected member of the Board of Faculty of Dental Surgery at the Royal College of Surgeons of England and a full member of the North Atlantic Division of the USA Angle Society.

Abstract

A key goal for all orthodontists is the minimisation of treatment duration whilst maintaining excellence of treatment outcome. In recent years, a number of techniques have been popularised that aim to reduce orthodontic treatment time by speeding up rates of tooth movement. These include the use of different bracket designs and archwire sequences, customised appliances, vibrational force application, photobiomodulation and surgical-assisted orthodontics. This lecture will review the scientific basis of these different techniques and focus on the clinical evidence base for their efficiency. The relevance of these findings will be discussed in relation to current clinical practice.

Airway

Won Moon

Non-Surgical Expansion with Midfacial Skeletal Expander (MSE) for Upper Airway Obstructive Patients

Won Moon

Professional Experience and Education

2013-2019 Thomas R. Bales Endowed Chair in Orthodontics, UCLA School of Dentistry
2012-2019 Program Director, Section of Orthodontics, UCLA School of Dentistry
2007-2015 Clinic Director, Section of Orthodontics, UCLA School of Dentistry
2003-2019 Director, International Affairs, Section of Orthodontics, UCLA School of Dentistry
1989-1991 UCLA Post-Doctoral Orthodontic Residency Program and MS in Oral Biology, UCLA School of Dentistry
1984-1989 DMD, Harvard School of Dental Medicine
1980-1984 BS, Mathematics, University of California Irvine

Honors and Awards

2019 Inspirational Leadership and Dedication Award, UCLA School of Dentistry
2018 AAOF 2018 Center Grant Award, AAOF
2014 Groundbreaking Research Project Grant Award (Decoding the Harmonic Face), UCLA School of Dentistry

Research Interests

Mid-facial expansion, 3D image analysis, Genomewide Association Study of Craniofacial Phenotypes, Finite Element Model (FEM), Applications of 3D Printing, Orthopedic Correction, Airway Changes, Accelerated Tooth Movement, and Micro-implant (MI) Design study

Abstract

The primary aim of this presentation is to illustrate how the maxillary skeletal expander (MSE) has evolved from its birth, by examining the dental and skeletal effects of maxillary expansion when the conventional rapid palatal expander (RPE), the surgically-assisted rapid palatal expander (SARPE), and the micro-implant assisted MSE are used. Dental expansion, bone bending, and true skeletal expansion will be compared. The adverse clinical consequences of RPE and SARPE will be explored, and a new approach eliminating these problems by the use of MSE will be presented. Clinical cases involving non-surgical midfacial expansion in both adolescent and adult patients will be examined.

The secondary aim is to demonstrate other advantages of utilizing MSE. Many patients requiring maxillary expansion often have narrow nasal airways, and positive changes in nasal airway with application of MSE are common. Clinical cases and research findings illustrating the enlargement of nasal airways after MSE in both adolescent and adult patients will be evaluated. Furthermore, improved breathing capacity after MSE expansion will be illustrated by dynamic airflow measurements and computational fluid dynamic simulations. The use of growth modification and distraction-like expansion and protraction techniques in conjunction with this new device open the door to many new possibilities, especially for patients with nasal airway obstruction and Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome.

The latest findings from the UCLA research team will be presented in order to enhance depth of understanding in impact of MSE for improving the upper airway.

Airway

Leslie A. Will

Update on Orthognathic Surgery: Long Term Stability and Relationship to Airway

Leslie A. Will

Professional Experience and Education

2009-present Chair and Program Director, Boston University Department of Orthodontics
2007-2009 Program Director, Tufts University Department of Orthodontics
1998-2007 Chair and Program Director, Department of Growth and Development, Harvard School of Dental Medicine
1995-1998 Associate Professor, University of Illinois at Chicago Department of Orthodontics
1982-1989 Assistant Professor, Loyola University of Chicago Department of Orthodontics
1982 MSD and certificate, University of Washington
1980 DMD, Harvard University

Honors and Awards

1980 American Association of Orthodontists Award for Exceptional Interest in the development of the Oro-facial Complex
2000 ELAM Fellow

Research Interests

  • Treatment outcomes
  • Development of dentoskeletal norms using cone beam CT
  • Characterization of skeletal transverse discrepancies with CBCT
  • Quality of life in orthodontic and orthognathic patients
  • Normal and abnormal growth and development

Abstract

Orthognathic surgical procedures are a reliable method of correcting dentoskeletal deformities of the jaws. These procedures have shown good long term stability in two dimensions. However, three-dimensional assessment of the long term stability of bimaxillary surgery is lacking in the literature.
Sixty-one patients had CBCTs taken at three time points: preoperative (T0), postoperative (T1) (10 days-8 weeks), and at least one year after the surgery (T2). Patients were divided into two groups according to the rotation of the occlusal plane during surgery.
Thirty-three anatomical landmarks were identified, and measurements were taken relative to 7 planes to assess multiplanar movement of each jaw. Overall, 17 measurements showed significant differences between T1 and T2.
Results shows that the bimaxillary advancement procedures were stable for at least one year except for lengthening of the mandible as measured between the mental foramen and lingula and widening of the gonial angles.

Part of this sample also had airway assessments pre- and postoperatively which were evaluated for changes in nasal cavity, nasopharyngeal, oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal compartments. The amount of movement for each surgery was measured from skeletal landmarks to reference planes and was correlated with volumetric changes.

Bimaxillary advancement significantly increased nasopharyngeal (27.45%), oropharyngeal (66.39%), and hypopharyngeal (52.48%) volumes. For every millimeter anterior movement, oropharyngeal volume increased by 2319.2±771.8 mm3, while every millimeter downward movement showed a significant increase in nasopharyngeal volume.

These results show that bimaxillary surgery is stable for at least 1 year postoperatively and leads to significant increases in airway volume.

Airway

Yuehua Liu

Upper airway dilatation and dentofacial growth modification in children with obstructive sleep apnea

Yuehua Liu

Professional Experience and Education

Dr. LIU Yuehua is a Professor and Dean of Shanghai Stomatological Hospital, Fudan University. He got the Ph. D degree in 1996 from Peking University and was a Postdoctoral fellow in the University of British Columbia, Canada from 1998 to 2000.

Honors and Awards

Now he is an Executive Member of the Council and Vice-President of Chinese Orthodontic Society of Chinese Stomatological Association (CSA), Vice-Director of the Council and Immediately Past President of Shanghai Orthodontic Society of Shanghai Stomatological Association (SSA), an Examiner in Orthodontics, the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh.Professor LIU has been in charge of 6 General Programs of National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), published over 30 peer-reviewed papers on SCI Journals and authorized 4 National Invention patents. In addition, he was awarded the second prize of the advanced science and technology, Ministry of Education, PRC, in 2002 and the second prize of the advanced medical science and technology, Chinese Association of Medicine, PRC, in 2003.

Research Interests

He has been interested in rensearch in obstructive sleep apnea in children, dentofacial vertical control for profile improvement, and lingual orthodontics.

Abstract

The etiologic factors of Obstructive sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome(OSAHS) include anatomic narrowing and dysfunction of uppe airway. The pathogenesis,treatment stratege and prognosis of OSAHS in children could be different from that in adult. The manifestation of those children with OSAHS may include hypertrophy of tonsils and adenoid, mouth breathing, narrowed upper arch, clockwise rotated mandilbe,and uppe airway narrowing. Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy could never eliminate the symptoms of OSAHS in children because hard tissue anatomic abnormality surrounding uppe airway still exist. In this presentation, the children with different sererity of OSAHS were subdivided into several groups with different therapies. those therapeutic methods include Tonsillectomy & adenoidectomy, oral appliance for upper arch expansion and mandibular advancement, and myofunctional reeducation. the subjective and objective treatment efficency to OSAHS were assessed by using questionnaire, and polysomnography. The effects of dentofacial growth modification from oral appliances and myofunctional reeducation were measured and analysed. The results demonstrated that combination of various methods may achievevd more satisfied curative effect.

Patient's Expectations and Treatment

Patient’s Expectations and Treatment

Steven J. Lindauer

Patient Expectations and the Future of Orthodontics

Steven J. Lindauer

Professional Experience and Education

2012-Present Editor, The Angle Orthodontist
2000-Present Professor and Chair, Department of Orthodontics, Virginia Commonwealth University
1989-2000 Professor, Associate Professor, Assistant Professor, Department of Orthodontics, Virginia Commonwealth University
1986-1989 MDentSci, Cert Orthodontic Postgraduate Program, School of Dental Medicine, University of Connecticut
1982-1986 DMD, School of Dental Medicine, University of Connecticut
1978-1982 BA, University of Pennsylvania

Honors and Awards

2017 Inducted into The International College of Dentists
2009 Inducted into The American College of Dentists

Research Interests

Orthodontic Clinical Outcomes
Orthodontic Biomechanics

Abstract

The specialty of orthodontics is undergoing rapid transformation and the pace of change has left many orthodontists feeling uncertain and perhaps even afraid of what the future will hold. While scientific research and appliance innovations allow achievement of increasingly dramatic and precise dental movements, patients often request faster and more convenient treatment options that lead to compromised outcomes. Technological advancement, economic pressure, increased competition, and shifts in marketing make it difficult to predict where we are going. It is clearly established that most patients seek orthodontic treatment because they want their teeth and their smile to look better. Is it appropriate to set goals for orthodontic treatment if there are no confirmed detrimental effects caused by not meeting them? What do our patients expect from the orthodontic treatment they voluntarily seek, and how willing are they to accept compromises? The answers to these questions may shape the future of orthodontics as we adapt to a changing environment.

Patient’s Expectations and Treatment

Susan J. Cunningham

Great Expectations - understanding patient expectations in orthodontics

Susan J. Cunningham

Professional experience and education

2010 to date Professor/ Honorary Consultant, UCL Eastman Dental Institute
2007 to date Programme Director, Postgraduate Orthodontic programme, UCL Eastman Dental Institute
2001-2010 Senior Lecturer/ Honorary Consultant, UCL Eastman Dental Institute
1995-2001 Lecturer, Eastman Dental Institute, London
1992-1995 Postgraduate/ Registrar, Eastman Dental Institute, London
2000 PhD University College London
1988 BChD Leeds University

Honors and Awards

2020 to date Director of Research, British Orthodontic Society
2013-2017 Director of Education, British Orthodontic Society
2009-2020 Honorary Secretary, European Orthodontic Society

Research interests

Outcomes of orthodontic and orthognathic treatment
Psychological aspects of dentofacial concerns

Abstract

Understanding and managing patient expectations are fundamental aspects of any healthcare intervention, but are particularly important in elective treatments such as orthodontics.

This presentation will consider the importance of having a comprehensive understanding of patient expectations with respect to both the process and outcomes of orthodontic treatment, reflecting also on the relationship between expectations and patient satisfaction. The management of realistic and unrealistic expectations will be discussed, highlighting the importance of good communication if this is to be successful.

Imaging and Digital Orthodontics

Om P. Kharbanda

Automation in 3D cephalometrics and volumetric craniofacial imaging

Om P. Kharbanda

Chief Centre for Dental Education and Research All India Institute of Medical Sciences New Delhi from 2015
Chief Centre for Medical Education and Technology All India Institute of Medical Sciences from 2015
Professor and Head Division of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Deformities CDER AIIMS from 2004
Joined AIIMS as Postgraduate Teacher in 1985 and continued in various Faculty positions
Senior Lecturer and Consultant Orthodontics at the University of Sydney 2000-2003

Orations

Indian Orthodontic Society Oration 54th Indian Orthodontic Conference Bhubaneshwar 2019
Dr R Ahmed Oration at 71st National Indian Dental Conference Bhubaneswar 2018
Dr Suresh Raghunath Tambwekar Founders Oration during 15th Annual Conference of Cleft Lip and Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies Chandigarh 2016
Maj Gen Kartar Singh Oration during 30th Annual Pierre Fauchard Academy (PFA) Convocation and Award Ceremony Thiruvanthapuram 2016.
Invited Speaker 43rd Annual Moyers Symposium, Michigan University, USA, March 2016.
Prof V Surendra Shetty Oration during 8th World Implant Orthodontic Conference, Goa, November 2016.
Prof HS Shaikh Oration of Indian Orthodontic Society 2014
KOSG Oration of the Indian Orthodontic Society delivered during 49th Indian Orthodontic Conference Kolkata, 2014
Professor S Ranagachari Oration of the Government Dental College Chennai 2013
VASAVI Memorial Oration of the Indian Orthodontic Society delivered during 37th Indian Orthodontic Conference Lucknow 2002

Honours and Awards

Shakuntala Amirchand Award by the Indian Council of Medical Research. 1994
Best Research Paper Award presented in the Indian Orthodontic Conference, 1987
Dr PP Jacob Gold Medal for the Best Research paper published in the Journal of the Indian Orthodontic Society 1999.
Best Research Poster Award Australian Orthodontic Society Brisbane 2008
National Academy of Medical Sciences Award 2013
Outstanding Professor Award of the Indian Orthodontic Society 2018.

Research interests

3D Technology in Orthodontics NonExtraction Treatment Miniscrew Implants Cleft lip and palate

Abstract

The science and technology of 3D imaging at relatively low radiation and advanced software capabilities have enabled clinicians and researchers three dimensional visualisation, measurements and volumetric analysis of the craniofacial region. Researchers have proposed new 3D landmarks and 3D cephalometric analysis. The complexity of on-screen three-dimensional landmark plotting requires considerable effort and time notwithstanding the experience of the operator as compared to landmark plotting on 2D conventional cephalogram. Such issues necessitated the urge for automating the process of 3D landmark plotting and measurements. In the last few years, three types of approaches for automatic detection of cephalometric landmarks have been proposed. The first being registration-based and second knowledge-based and third deep learning-based. We have developed an innovative knowledge-based technique and tested its reliability for automation of useful 3D cephalometric landmarks. The automated detection can also generate linear, angles and ratios measurements. One step ahead, using template matching extended to a knowledge of anatomical definitions on CBCT, our group has developed an automated volumetric analysis of paranasal sinus and nasal-respiratory passages.

This presentation will deal with the current automated 3D cephalometric analysis and novel patented technology of automated 3D cephalometric and airway analysis with the least indulgence of an orthodontist for 3D plotting and measurements. The presentation will dwell upon how the possibilities of knowledge-based automation could add new dimensions in the understanding of malocclusion assessment and how functional jaw orthopaedics, orthodontics and surgical treatment would affect the craniofacial structures in three dimensions of space and volume of the functional spaces.

Imaging and Digital Orthodontics

Nikhilesh R. Vaid

C"LOUD" & CLEAR!

Nikhilesh R. Vaid

Prof Nikhilesh R. Vaid is currently the PRESIDENT -ELECT of the World Federation of Orthodontists. He is a Past President of the Asian Pacific Orthodontic Society & the Indian Orthodontic Society. Prof Vaid is Editor in Chief of APOS Trends in Orthodontics -the Journal of the Asian Pacific Orthodontic Society and three issues of Seminars in Orthodontics, including one on "Digital Technologies in Orthodontics"
He has a practice in Mumbai, India and Dubai ,UAE. He is the VICE DEAN and Professor of Orthodontics at the European University, Dubai Health Care City, DUBAI,UAE.

Abstract

The past decade in Orthodontics has made some very "emphatic statements",which will chart the course of how orthodontics is practiced, marketed, researched and taught over the next decade and probably the rest of this century!
The presentation will discuss the technological kaleidoscope from an evidence based perspective, as influencing the speciality of orthodontics. The application of cloud based services to clinical care and their futuristic possibilities will be analyzed. Core Data Sets (CDS)of tech infusion research in orthodontics will be presented.
The learning objectives will be -
1) Identification of seminal literature on technological developments and their impact on the speciality.
2) Analysis of "what we know" about technological infusions in the last decade,"what we don't" and bridge the gap between the two.
3) Understand with clinical examples-where technology can enhance patient outcomes, where it can't !

Imaging and Digital Orthodontics

Toru Deguchi

Three-dimensional diagnostic application for graduate program in United States

Toru Deguchi

Professional Experience and Education

1992 Graduated Aichi-Gakuin University School of Dentistry
1996 Graduated PhD course in Orthodontics in Okayama University
2001 Graduated Master course in Orthodontics in Indiana University
2001 Clinical instructor in Department of Orthodontics in Indiana University
2002 Assistant professor in Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics in Okayama University
2010 Associate professor in Division of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics in Tohoku University
2013 Associate professor and Program Director in The Ohio State University Division of Orthodontics

Honors and Awards

2002 Distinguished Scientific Award in 62nd Annual Meeting of the Japanese Orthodontic Society
2005 Distinguished Research Award in Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences
2005 Distinguished Scientific Award in 53rd Annual Meeting of the Japanese Association for Dental Research
2005, 2007, 2011, 2013, 2014, 2019
Excellent Presentation Award in Annual Meeting of the Japanese Orthodontic Society
2010 Young Investigator Award in The 3rd Interface Oral Health Science International Symposium
2014 Michael Matlof Memorial Teaching Fellowship Award from American Association of Orthodontics
2016 Burstone Indiana Biomechanics Award from American Association of Orthodontics

Research Interests

Dr. Toru Deguchi has been focusing his clinical interests in the field of temporary anchorage device, lingual orthodontics, and interdisciplinary cases. He has been also engaged in the research field such as histomorphometric studies related to tooth movement and pain related studies. Recently, he has initiated research related to three-dimensional diagnostic system in clinical orthodontics.

Abstract

In recent years, there have been a significant progress in three-dimensional (3D) diagnostic system in the field of orthodontics. Remarkable development of intra-oral scanner, the use of digital model, 3D printer, and cone beam CT has contributed to these innovative changes. Combining these 3D tools will be able to visualize the problem and help patients understanding the treatment goals and may contribute in enhancing the work efficiency for the orthodontists. These techniques also have influenced in constructing various orthodontic appliances including in-house aligners and retainers. In this presentation, I would like to introduce how we apply these 3D systems in diagnosis and treatment planning such as setup models, visual treatment objectives, and managing surgical prediction and constructing the splints in our post graduate orthodontic program. I will also present some of our current research with regard to reliability and the usefulness of 3D diagnostic system in clinical orthodontics.

Cleft Lip and Palate

Cleft Lip and Palate

Jonathan R. Sandy

Orthodontists central to health care in cleft lip and palate

Jonathan R. Sandy

Professional Experience and Education

2014 to 2019 Dean of Medicine, Dentistry and Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Bristol.
2007 to 2014 Head of Bristol Dental School, University of Bristol.
1991 to 2020 Consultant Senior Lecturer, Reader, Professor in Orthodontics, Bristol Dental School, University of Bristol.
1988 to1991 Post-Doctoral research scientist, Biochemistry Department University of Cambridge.
1985 to 1988 PhD, Dental Institute, University of London, Eastman Dental Hospital.
1979 to 1985 Orthodontic training, Dental Institute, University of London, Eastman Dental Hospital.
1972 to 1976 Undergraduate dental training, Kings College Dental School, University of London

Honors and Awards

2007 FGDP Fellowship Ad Eundem, Royal College of Surgeons of England
2006 Northcroft Memorial Lecturer, British Orthodontic Society
2005 The Clifford Ballard Memorial Lecture, British Orthodontic Society
2005 Faculty Teaching & Learning Prize, University of Bristol
2005 British Orthodontic Society Distinction Award
2001 King James IV Professorship, Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh
2001 Charles Tomes Lecture, Royal College of Surgeons of England
1998 Fellowship of the Academy of Medical Sciences
1992 Colyer Prize, Royal Society of Medicine
1990 Chapman Prize British Society for the Study of Orthodontics
1985 Medical Research Council Research Training Fellowship for 3 years
1984 Association of University Teachers in Orthodontics Research Prize

Research interests

My research interests are centred around children born with orofacial clefting. I supported the National Institute for Health Research funded programme, Cleft Care UK, where we evaluated the impact of the centralisation of cleft services following the recommendations made by the Clinical Standards Advisory Group CSAG in 1998. I lead the Scar Free Foundation birth cohort gene backed study known as the Cleft Collective.

Abstract

The care of children born with a cleft lip and palate requires multidisciplinary care from a wide range of healthcare professionals and arguably, as this is a repairable structural anomaly, the surgeons (from whatever parent discipline) would be expected to be pivotal in organising healthcare of these children.
It is the orthodontists who have had influence in how changes in service and research can be used to improve outcomes with clear objective evidence to inform care configurations. In the United Kingdom (UK) this evolved from early work by Mike Mars in Great Ormond Street where he identified how craniofacial growth and dento-alveolar relationships are influenced in oro-facial clefting and by surgical treatment. In conjunction with Gunvor Semb from Oslo he developed measures of dento-alveolar relations (the GOSLON Index) which enabled surgical outcomes to be assessed by proxy. This was one of the measures used in the seminal six centre Eurocleft study led by Bill Shaw and the outcomes of this (where the two UK centres consistently had the worst results) informed the need for a review of cleft services in the UK. Using research from Manchester and Bristol, the Clinical Standards Advisory Group study published a report in 1998 and cleft services in the UK were centralised over several years. In a follow up study, the impact of this centralisation has yielded significant changes and improvements in overall cleft care in the UK and this has also enabled further research opportunities for clinical and genetic research.

Cleft Lip and Palate

Naoto Suda

Regenerative medicine and orthodontic treatment for cleft lip and palate children

Naoto Suda
2010-present Professor, Division of Orthodontics, Department of Human Development and Fostering, Meikai University School of Dentistry
2005-2010 Lecturer, Maxillofacial Orthognathics, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University
1998-2004 Assistant Professor, Maxillofacial Orthognathics, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University
1996-1997 Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science
1993-1995 Visiting Academics, St. Vincent Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne University
1988-1992 Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (Ph.D)
1982-1988 Faculty of Dentistry, Hokkaido University

Abstract

Cleft lip and palate (CLP) causes various morphological and functional problems in esthetics of nose and lip, feeding, speech and occlusion. Among them, correction of occlusion requires long and comprehensive intervention. It is important to minimize the burden of orthodontic treatment, together with providing successful outcome for patients with CLP. The condition of intermaxillary relation, maxillary arch form, and normal tooth eruption are all related to the difficulty of orthodontic correction. A tight collaboration of orthodontists with other specialists in related fields is essential to reduce the burden of CLP children.
The regular treatment protocol in our area is to perform Millard-type gingivoperiosteoplasty (GPP) together with cheiloplasty at 3-6 months old after presurgical infant orthopedics using passive plate. Furlow palatoplasty was performed at 12-18 months old. Early alveolar closure by GPP can enable the normal maxillary arch form with integrated alveolus, and avoid performing secondary bone graft. However, labio-lingual width and alveolar height are insufficient in some cases. Regenerative medicine using the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is expected as a useful strategy to increase bone bridge formation. We isolated MSCs from human umbilical cord and transplanted with hydroxyapatite and collagen into the animal model of alveolar cleft. The human umbilical cord derived MSCs could induce successful bone bridge formation in this model.
In this presentation, some possible attempts are going to be discussed to reduce the burden of orthodontic treatment for CLP children.

Genetics

Sylvia A. Frazier-Bowers

Designer Genes and Personalized Orthodontics: The Clinical Relevance of Genetic Advances

Sylvia A. Frazier-Bowers

Professional Experience and Education

December 1999 UNC at Chapel Hill PhD, Genetics & Molecular Biology
May 1997 UNC at Chapel Hill Certificate, Orthodontics
May 1993 University of Illinois at Chicago D.D.S., Dentistry
December 1991 University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign B.S., Dentistry
August 1987 University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign B.A., English, cognate in Biology
2018 to Present Assistant Dean, Inclusive Excellence and Equity Initiatives, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
2011 to Present Associate Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, School of Dentistry, Department of Orthodontics
2004 to 2011 Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, School of Dentistry, Department of Orthodontics
2006 to 2011 Adjunct Faculty, Carolina Center for Genome Sciences
2001 to 2004 Assistant Professor, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Dental Branch, Department of Orthodontics
2002 to 2004 Adjunct Faculty, UTHSCH Medical School, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Genetics Division
2000 to 2001 Postdoctoral Fellow andResearch Assistant Professor, UTHSCH, Dental Branch, Department of Orthodontics

Honors and Awards

2019 Relational Leadership Institute
2015 to 2017 Academic Leadership Program Fellow, UNC Institute for the Arts and Humanities
2013 SAO Faculty Lecture Award, Southern Association of Orthodontists
2012 Class of 2012, Excellence in Mentoring Award, SNDA, UNC School of Dentistry
2011 Class of 2011 Excellence in Teaching Award, Department of Orthodontics, UNC School of Dentistry
2009 UNC School of Dentistry Student Research Mentor Award
2006 2006 General Clinical Research Centers Outstanding Trainee Award
2006 UNC School of Dentistry Student Research Mentor Award
2006 UNC Junior Faculty Development Award (designated IBM fund award)
2002 2002 Earl Shepard Memorial Fellowship Award from the American Association of Orthodontist Foundation
2001 2001 Albert P Westfall Memorial Teaching Fellowship Award from the American Association of Orthodontist Foundation

Research Interests

My current efforts also broadly focus on gene discovery and phenotype dissection of dentofacial variation and eruption disorders using 2 and 3 dimensional methods for rigorous clinical characterization, genotyping and mutational analysis through the candidate gene approach.

Abstract

This lecture will provide an overview of current practices in the diagnosis and treatment of malocclusions with a genetic basis. We are quickly approaching a time when personalized orthodontics will be an integral part of our diagnostic regime just as it is with medicine. Taking a family history in fact represents the gold standard in the diagnosis and management of medical (and by extension) dental disorders. The objective of this lecture will be to recognize and diagnose both common and rare dental disorders encountered in orthodontic practices from both clinical and genetic perspectives. Data from genetic and clinical studies have helped to create a paradigm shift in contemporary orthodontic practices. Applying genetic knowledge to the field of orthodontics will augment the current differential diagnosis of dental disorders, permitting recognition of etiologically distinct disorders that respond to treatment in different ways. That is, proper diagnosis equals proper treatment. This session will include discussion of Primary Failure of Eruption, ankylosis, delayed eruption and Class III malocclusion with an emphasis on adopting a diagnostic rubric for proper management. Or, what to do, and what not to do.

Genetics

Carine E.L. Carels

Genetics and Genomics of Orofacial Clefting and Tooth Agenesis

Carine E.L. Carels

CV Prof. dr. Carine CARELS, DDS, PhD, hon fellow FDSRCS

  • Professor and Head Dept of Orthodontics, KU Leuven, Belgium, 1987-2008
  • Sabbatical Leave at Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands (to study Genetics and Molecular Life Sciences, Bachelor and Master Level), Academic Year 2008-2009
  • Professor of Orthodontics with emphasis on Dental and Facial Genetics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands (2010-2016)
  • Professor in the Department of Oral Health Sciences, KU Leuven, Belgium (2016-2017)
  • Professor in the Department of Human Genetics and of Oral Health Sciences, KU Leuven, Belgium (2017- now)

Abstract

Tooth agenesis and orofacial clefts both represent very common developmental anomalies and their co-occurrence is often reported in patients as well as in animal models. Here we aimed to perform a systematic review to thoroughly investigate the literature in order to identify genes and genomic loci contributing to syndromic or non-syndromic co-occurrence of tooth agenesis and orofacial clefts and to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying their dual involvement in the development of teeth and facial primordia. Altogether, 84 articles including phenotype and genotype description provided 9 genomic loci and 26 gene candidates underlying the co-occurrence of the two congenital defects: MSX1, PAX9, IRF6, TP63, KMT2D, KDM6A, SATB2, TBX22, TGFα, TGFβ3, TGFβR1, TGFβR2, FGF8, FGFR1, KISS1R, WNT3, WNT5A, CDH1, CHD7, AXIN2, TWIST1, BCOR, OFD1, PTCH1, PITX2 and PVRL1.
The molecular pathways, cellular functions, tissue-specific expression and disease association were investigated using publicly accessible databases (EntrezGene, UniProt, OMIM). The Gene Ontology terms of the biological processes mediated by the candidate genes were used to cluster them using the GOTermMapper (Lewis-Sigler Institute, Princeton University), speculating on six super-clusters: (a) anatomical development, (b) cell division, growth and motility, (c) cell metabolism and catabolism, (d) cell transport, (e) cell structure organization and (f) organ/system-specific processes.
This review aims to increase the knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the co-occurrence of tooth agenesis and orofacial clefts, to pave the way for improving targeted (prenatal) molecular diagnosis and finally to reflect on therapeutic or ultimately preventive strategies for these disabling conditions in the future.

Genetics

Tetsutaro Yamaguchi

Human Genetics in Malocclusion

Tetsutaro Yamaguchi

Professional Experience and Education

2019-prs Professor and chair, Department of Oral Interdisciplinary, Division of Orthodontics, Kanagawa Dental University Graduate School of Dentistry, Japan
2012-2019 Associate Professor, Division of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Japan
2007-2012 Assistant Professor, Division of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Japan
2004-2007 Research Associate, Division of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Japan
2000-2004 Clinical Researcher, Division of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Japan
1996-2000 Graduate School of Dentistry, Showa University, Ph.D., Orthodontics
1989-1995 School of Dentistry, Showa University, D.D.S., Dentistry

Honors and Awards

2018, 2017, 2015
The Japanese Society for Jaw Deformities, The Best Poster Presentation Award
2016, 2012, 2010, 2009, 2008
The Japanese Orthodontic Society, The Best Poster Presentation Award
2011 The Kamijo Grant Prize (Research), Showa University

Research Interests

Human genetics in orofacial disease and traits

Abstract

Malocclusion, an incorrect relationship between the maxilla and the mandible or a general misalignment of the teeth, is highly influenced by genetics. Genetic exploration of human craniofacial morphology, as morphological variation, began in 2001. In recent years, several genome-wide studies have surfaced that began with simple curiosity regarding the development and organization of the human face. Major contributions to progress in this area were made by researchers in various fields, including anatomy and human evolution, rather than by dentists. Explosive recent advances in genome science have identified genetic factors of malocclusion in humans. Research on the genetics of human mandibular prognathism was initiated in 2005; thereafter, it progressed by studying human genes with malocclusion as a phenotype.
Several important discoveries have been made, to date. Genes underlying congenital anomalies play important roles in the dentofacial variation in human malocclusion, even in healthy populations. Moreover, in genome-wide studies, genes with previously unknown functions were associated with human craniofacial morphology. Various phenotype classification and human genetic analysis, each having advantages and disadvantages, have been applied in relation to human genetics in malocclusion. With limitations in each method, the current status, based on associated literature, is difficult to report from the standpoint of reproducibility. In this context, considering everything that has been learned to date, what sort of progress in research will have to be made in future? What hopes and expectations are reasonable? To benefit clinical practice, prospective malocclusion research will be conducted by examining existing studies.

Yanheng Zhou

INVISALIGN- CHANGES TO ORTHODONTICS TODAY

Yanheng Zhou

Professional Experience and Education

2002-present Professor, Department of Orthodontics, Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing, China
2018-2021 Adjunct Professor, Department of Orthodontics, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
2010-2015 Chair, Department of Orthodontics, Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing, China
2009-present Adjunct Professor, Department of Orthodontics, School of Dental Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA
2000-2010 Vice Chair, Department of Orthodontics, Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing, China
2000-2001 Associate Professor, Department of Orthodontics, Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing, China
1998-2000 Vice Chair, Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Beijing Medical University, Beijing, China
1997-2000 Associate Professor, Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Beijing Medical University, Beijing, China
1996-1997 Adv. Dip. University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
1993-1996 Assistant Professor, Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Beijing Medical University, Beijing, China
1989-1993 Ph.D. Beijing Medical University, Beijing, China
1984-1989 D.D.S. Xi'an Medical University, Xi'an, Shaanxi, China

Honors and Awards

2012 2nd prize, Chinese Medical Association, China
2012 2nd prize, Beijing Association for Science and Technology, China
2012 Mentor Award for Outstanding Doctoral Thesis, Peking University, China
2001 1st prize, Chinese Medical Award, China
2001 3rd prize, Beijing Scientific and Technical Achievements, China
2000 2nd prize, Science and Technology Award, Ministry of Education, China
2000 2nd prize, the 7th National Excellent Young Teacher Award, Ministry of Education, China
1997 3rd prize, Science and Technology Award, Ministry of Public Health, China

Research Interests

Adult orthodontics
Combined surgical and orthodontic approach
Orthodontic treatment in periodontal patients
Micro-screw anchorage
Customized lingual orthodontics
Invisible orthodontics
Mechanism and immunoregulation of orthodontic tooth movement
Application of stem cell and bioinspired material in oral tissue defects repair

Abstract

How Invisalign change the orthodontics? As we know, Invisalign was first released by Align Technology in 1997. After 23 years' growth and development, the Invisalign has changed the life of our orthodontists. The Invisalign has changed the way how the orthodontists treat the patients, and also the way how the orthodontists work at the clinic. At the same time, The Invisalign has changed the way how the patients come to see the orthodontists. The Invisalign has made the orthodontic treatment more invisible and more comfortable. The Invisalign has also made the opportunity for those patients who couldn't receive the orthodontic treatment with conventional braces.

Geraldine G. Lee

Be ahead of the curve: In-house clear aligners

Geraldine G. Lee

Professional Experience and Education

2008 - 2012 Associate Consultant, National Dental Centre (Singapore)
2009 - 2013 Clinical Tutor, Orthodontic Residency Programme, National University of Singapore (Singapore)
2012 - Present Clinical Director, The Orthodontic Clinic
2015-2017 President, Association of Orthodontists, Singapore
2016 - Present Key opinion Leader, 3Shape

Abstract

As intraoral scanners and digital workflows gain popularity in clinics everywhere, clinicians are able to increase their clinic offering with in-house clear aligners and differentiate themselves from the rest.
Dr Lee will take you through the process of fabricating clear aligner treatment for simple cases entirely within your dental clinic. She will discuss proper case selection, how to take digital impressions and create instant treatment simulations, and fabrication of the clear aligners in-house. The biomechanics of moving teeth will be discussed, as well as what to look out for when planning a treatment strategy.

Noriyoshi Shimizu

Easy debonding of ceramic brackets bonded with a light-cured orthodontic adhesive containing heat-expandable microcapsules with a CO2 laser

Noriyoshi Shimizu

Professional Experience and Education

2019 Project Professor of Nihon University School of Dentistry
2016-2018 President of Japanese Orthodontic Society
2015 Research in Charge of Nihon University School of Dentistry
2014 Director of Nihon University Dental Technician School, School of Dentistry
2013 Vice Dean of Nihon University School of Dentistry
2007-2012 Director of Nihon University Dental Hospital
2003-2018 Professor and Chairman in Department of Orthodontics, Nihon University School of Dentistry
1999 Associate Professor of Nihon University School of Dentistry
1986-1988 Visiting Researcher, University of Toronto, MRC group in Periodontal Physiology
1985 Assistant Professor of Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo
1982 Graduated from Nihon University Graduate School of Dentistry

Honors and Awards

2016 Best poster presentation award, World Federation for Laser Dentistry
2013 Academic award. The Japanese Society for Jaw Deformities
2011 Excellent presentation award. The Japanese Orthodontic Society

Research Interests

Biology of periodontal tissues

Abstract

We investigated an easy debonding method for ceramic brackets using a light-cured Bis-GMA resin adhesives containing thermal expansion microcapsules and CO2 laser.
In order to debond the ceramic bracket, a heavy force must be applied physically to the bracket; this can sometimes cause fractures of the enamel and intense tooth pain. An orthodontic adhesive therefore must have contradictory properties that firmly bond the tooth and bracket during treatment but can easily separate them after treatment.
To find out the CO2 laser irradiation conditions (Operalaser PRO, YOSHIDA), the bracket surface was irradiated with the laser and the bracket base temperature and inside temperature of the pulp chamber under various conditions were evaluated using thermocouple sensor. Sixty brackets, bonded with paste and bonding agent containing microcapsule contents 0, 10, 20, 25 and 30 wt% were irradiated with CO2 laser. Shear bond strength tests were performed at 10 min after irradiation with a dental material universal testing machine.
With CO2 laser irradiation for 5s to the bracket, the bond strength in the 25% microcapsule group decreased significantly, to ~0.17 fold, compared with that of the no-laser group(P<0.05). The maximum temperature rise in the pulp chamber was 5.3°C with laser irradiation, which was less than the level that induces pulp damage.
From these results, it seems likely that the combined use of a light-cured orthodontic bonding agent containing microcapsules and a CO2 laser is a simple debonding system for ceramic brackets, with less debonding time, enamel damage, and tooth pain.

Evidence Based Orthodontics

Evidence Based Orthodontics

Carlos Flores Mir

Application of evidence into daily orthodontic clinical decisions - the unerupted teeth story

Carlos Flores Mir

H-Index

53 Google Scholar - 32 Scopus - 31 Web of Science

Education

DDS (Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia ? Peru - 1994)
Certificate in Orthodontics (UPCH ? Peru - 1998)
BSc in Stomatology (UPCH ? Peru - 1994)
MSc in Stomatology (UPCH ? Peru - 1999)
DSc in Stomatology (UPCH ? Peru - 2002)
Postdoctoral Fellowship (University of Alberta- Canada - 2005)

Employment

Tenured Professor at the University of Alberta Extramural Private Practice in Edmonton, Canada

Current Position

Orthodontic Program Director, University of Alberta (since 04/10)
Head of the Division of Orthodontics, University of Alberta (04/10 to 06/17)
Assistant Editor, The Angle Orthodontist (Since 04/12)
Assistant Editor, Dental Press Journal of Orthodontics (Since 01/15)
Assistant Editor, Journal of World Federation of Orthodontics (Since 04/17)

Presentations

More than 120 international presentations around the topics of Clinical Orthodontics, Evidence-based Dentistry and Evidence-based Orthodontics (Argentina, Australia, Bolivia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Chile, Costa Rica, Germany, Iceland, Israel, Italy, Mexico, Netherlands, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Romania, Uruguay, USA, Scotland, Switzerland and Spain)

Major Teaching awards

2014 Department of Dentistry, Gibb Teaching Scholar Award, 2010 Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta ? Tier II Clinical Award for Excellence in Mentoring Student, 2007 Association of Canadian Faculties of Dentistry (ACFD) - W. W. Wood Award for Excellence in Dental Education

Publications

6 book chapters related to Evidence-based Dentistry 280 peer-reviewed articles and 37 commentaries published.

Abstract

This presentation will explore how recently published evidence (systematic reviews and randomized clinical trials) focused on impacted teeth has impacted my day to day clinical decisions when faced with a potential impacted canine. The following questions will be explored:
Does CBCT make always a difference? - diagnosis focus
Is there a better outcome if a specific surgical exposure approach is used? - management focus
Is it always worth to attempt to tract the impacted tooth down? - prognosis focus
Can early extraction of deciduous canines reduce the chances of permanent canine impaction? - prognosis focus
Clinical cases will be shown to facilitate the conversation.

Evidence Based Orthodontics

Padhraig Fleming

Orthodontic Retention: Not letting go?

Padhraig Fleming

Professional Experience

2018- Present Professor of Orthodontics, Queen Mary University of London Consultant
2017- Present Postgraduate Training Lead in Orthodontics, Queen Mary University of London.

Honours and Awards

2007 MSc with Distinction
2008 Membership in Orthodontics and British Orthodontic Society Medal
2011 Chapman Prize, British Orthodontic Society
2013 PhD
2013 BF and Helen E Dewel Award, American Association of Orthodontists.

Research Interests

Treatment effectiveness and Predictability
Clinical Trials

Abstract

While there is increasing acceptance of the necessity for indefinite retention, there has been relatively little prospective research concerning the relative effectiveness of fixed and removable retention protocols in the longer term.

Prolonged outcomes with fixed and removable regimes will be discussed on the basis of a recent randomized controlled trial with 4-year follow-up. Patient experiences associated with retention, including factors influencing compliance with removable retention will also be presented.

The effectiveness of novel electronic methods in enhancing adherence will be discussed on the basis of a further clinical trial. Finally, practical approaches to improving outcomes with both fixed and removable designs will be illustrated.

Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Juan M. Palomo

Sleep Apnea and the Orthodontist

Juan M. Palomo

Dr. Juan Martin Palomo is a professor and the Orthodontic Residency Director at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. Dr. Palomo's contributions to craniofacial imaging, informatics, and airway analysis have been recognized through medical and dental research awards, national and international presentations, and numerous peer reviewed publications. At the American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) he is a member of the Council on Scientific Affairs, member of the AAOF Planning and Awards Review Committee, the AAO representative for the Imaging Gently Healthcare group, and past chair of the Committee on Technology. He is also the Associate Editor for the Innovations and Technology section of the AJODO. He was a member of the AAO task force that resulted in a white paper on sleep apnea and orthodontics. Dr. Palomo is a board certified orthodontist, and Angle Society member, and an active member of the American Association of Orthodontists, the American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, and the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Abstract

Traditionally we are trained to see and analyze the airway from only the lateral view on a cephalometric film. But the airway is a three-dimensional (3D) structure, and that third dimension may be hiding something relevant to our diagnosis. This presentation will highlight some of the airway research from Case Western Reserve University, and will show how different commercially available programs can be used to analyze the airway volumetrically, how the airway is different for different craniofacial situations, and what happens to the airway when we extract or expand as part of our treatment plan. With more than 80 respiratory disorders, the orthodontist can play a big role helping children and adults, specially regarding Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). This presentation will show how the orthodontist can help identify and manage OSA in pediatric and adult patients, from using oral appliances, to surgical movement of the jaws, and newest hypoglossal stimulation methods. When moving from 2D to 3D, distances and angles turn into areas and volumes, and understanding the airway may take orthodontics to the next level, increasing the scope of what can be done clinically.

Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Seung-Hak Baek

Treatment Guideline for Adult obstructive sleep apnea Patients in Perspective of Sleep Function and Facial Aesthetics

Seung-Hak Baek

DDS, MSD, PhD degrees from Seoul National University (SNU)
Intern and resident in the Department of Orthodontics, SNU Hospital.
Professor in the Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry at SNU Visiting scholar at NYU, USC, LACH, CHOP, and UCLA in USA and TMDU in Japan
Vice president in the Korean Association of Orthodontists
Past immediate president of the Korean Cleft Lip and Palate Association
Member of the Editorial Review Board of Angle Orthodontist, American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, and European Journal of Orthodontics
Associate Editor in Progress in Orthodontics

Abstract

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a sleep disorder due to repetitive episodes of upper airway collapse. Several treatment modalities have been used for OSA patients including diet, exercise, sleep position change, nCPAP, nasopharyngeal soft tissue procedures, genioglossus advancement, oral appliances, rapid palatal expansion appliances, maxillomandibular advancement (MMA), hypoglossal nerve stimulation, and tracheostomy.
Conventional MMA (con-MMA) surgery can widen the cross-sectional area of the airway, decrease the airflow resistance and collapsibility of the airway during respiration, and eventually improve the airflow. However, if patients have protrusive lip, acute nasolabial angle, and small nose with low dorsum, 9-12 mm advancement of the maxillo-mandibular complex would result in esthetically unfavorable change in their facial profile. My colleagues and I have reported the concept of segmental MMA surgery (seg-MMA), which consists of (1) Le Fort I osteotomy and segmental osteotomy with advancement of the posterior segment of the maxilla, and (2) Bilateral Sagittal Split Ramus Osteotomy and segmental osteotomy with setback of the anterior segment and total advancement of the mandible. Indication of the seg-MMA procedure is OSA patients with a normally or forward positioned maxilla, labioversed maxillary incisors, a protrusive upper lip, and an acute nasolabial angle. The seg-MMA procedure with/without counterclockwise rotation might be an effective alternative to the con-MMA procedure for improving the sleep function and preventing aggravation of facial esthetics simultaneously.
Treatment modalities for OSA patients must be individualized according to age, body-mass index, airway obstruction site, degree of symptoms, severity of OSA parameters, and skeletodental and soft tissue patterns.

Diagnosis and Treatment Planning

Diagnosis and Treatment Planning

Hong He

Airway-centered orthodontic diagnosis and treatment for children

Hong He

Dr Hong He, BDS, MDS, PhD
Professor, Senior Consultant and Supervisor of Doctoral Students,
Chair of Department of Orthodontics, School & Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University
Vice President of Chinese Orthodontics Society (COS)
Vice President of Hubei Orthodontic Society
President of Wuhan Orthodontic Society
Standing Committee Member of Society of Chinese Cleft Lip & Palate
Standing Committee Member of Chinese Medical Doctor Association Sleep Medicine Committee
Fellow of International College of Dentists
Member and Examiner of Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh(MorthRCS)

Abstract

Pediatric sleep-related disorder breathing (SDB) is caused by upper airway obstruction, resulted often from adenoid hypertrophy, tonsil hypertrophy or nasal disease. Mouth breathing is one of the most common clinical manifestations of pediatric SDB. Children whose mouth breathing remains untreated may develop long, narrow faces, high palatal vaults, dental malocclusion, gummy smiles etc. because of orofacial muscle imbalance. SDB in children has been associated with a variety of comorbidities, including failure to thrive, hypertension, attention deficit disorder, enuresis etc. Orthodontists who have the knowledge of SDB can play an important role in the early diagnosis and treatment of pediatric SDB. It is recommended that the orthodontist perform a clinical risk assessment for SDB. Orthodontists may be involved in the treatment of pediatric SDB by correcting the underlying dental and skeletal deformities. When making the orthodontic treatment plan, orthodontists should account for children's upper airway condition.

Diagnosis and Treatment Planning

Kunihiko Miyashita

Dr. Broadbent's 90- year life records and its clinical applications by Cephalometrics

Kunihiko Miyashita

Career History

1976 DDS (Nihon University)
1982 Ortho. Certificate (UCLA)
2000 PhD (Nihon University)
1995 Visiting Professor (UCLA)
1996 Senior Researcher (Bolton Brush Growth Center)
1998- present Adjunct Professor (Case Western Reserve University)
2008- present Board member (Joint Cephalometrics Expert Group)

Award

1998, 1999 Instructor of the Year (UCLA)

Writing

1996 Contemporary Cephalometric Radiography, Quintessence Co, Inc

Abstract

This presentation consists of four parts.
The first part introduces the history of Cephalometrics in Cleveland. Cephalometrics is now approximately one hundred years old. Dr. B. Holly Broadbent Sr. developed the Broadbent-Bolton radiographic cephalometer with Prof.T.W. Todd in order to investigate human growth and development. The Bolton Brush Growth Study Center (BBGSC) was established in the late 1920s.
The second part of this presentation shows longitudinal records for Dr. Broadbent's family for about 90 years. The materials include Dr. Broadbent Sr., his wife, son, Dr Broadbent Jr., daughters, grand daughter and great-grand sons. The record now covers four generations. In addition to these family records, this presentation shows some examples of longitudinal records of normal growth and development in children and adults out of more than the 5000 cases collected in the BBGSC.
The third part introduces the JCEG(Joint Cephalometrics Experts Group) and shows their state of the art cephalometrics meeting reports. The first meeting was held at BBGSC in 1955 in order to discuss the the objectives of cephalometrics. The members consisted of cephalometrics experts, including Prof. Broadbent Sr., and leading researchers in the USA. Since CBCT had become popular by the early 2000s, another JCEG meeting has been held at the same place since 2008. There is a web-site dedicated to it, and the members now come from all-over the world. The current agenda is the transition from 2D to 3D cephalometrics.
The fourth part shows some of my long-term observation cases with recent JCEG meeting conclusion.

TMJ

Kotaro Tanimoto

The Mechanism of Degenerative Changes in Temporomandibular Joint and Possible Approach for Orthodontic Treatment

Kotaro Tanimoto

Professional Experience and Education

2016 - 2019 Vice dean, Hiroshima University School of Dentistry, Japan
2016 - 2019 Section chief , Hiroshima University Hospital, Division of Speech therapy, Japan
2016 - 2019 Section chief, Hiroshima University Hospital, Cleft and Craniofacial Center, Japan
2013 - 2019 Professor, Department of Orthodontics and Craniofacial Developmental Biology, Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Japan
2009 - 2012 Lecturer, Hiroshima University Dental Hospital Department of Oral Health Development Orthodontics, Japan
1999 - 2008 Assistant Professor, Department of Orthodontics and Craniofacial Developmental Biology, Hiroshima University Graduate school of Biomedical Sciences, Japan
2001 Ph.D, Hiroshima University Post Graduate Education of Dental Sciences
1995 - 1999 Resident, Department of Orthodontics, Hiroshima University Dental Hospital, Japan
1992 - 1995 Associate dentist, Akabane Dental Clinic, Tokyo, JAPAN
1992 DDS, Faculty of Dentistry, Hiroshima University

Honors and Awards

2019 Best Poster Presentation Award, Japanese Society for the Temporomandibular Joint
2019 Excellent Posterboard Presentation Award, Korean Association of Orthodontics

Research Interests

Temporomandibular disorders

Abstract

Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are frequently accompanied with malocclusion in orthodontic patients. Severe mandibular condylar resorption causes retrusion and deviation of the mandible, leading to the onset and progress of malocclusions such as skeletal open bite. In our department, if TMDs are diagnosed during the initial clinical examination of malocclusion patients, Temporomandibular joint (TMJ)-MRI is taken as a general rule. In cases where mandibular condylar deformity is suspected, orthodontic treatment will not start unless the condylar resorption abates.
The pathogenic mechanism of TMDs has been studied to establish safe and reliable orthodontic treatment procedure for patients with malocclusion accompanied by TMD. Although the detailed mechanism of TMDs pathology still remains unclear, inflammation in the synovial membrane and condylar cartilage has been believed to play a crucial role in the incidence of severe TMDs such as osteoarthritis (OA). TMJ-OA is characterized by degenerative joint changes such as deterioration and abrasion of the articular cartilage, and occurrence of thickening and remodeling of the underlying bone. Several cytokines were detected in the synovial fluid in patients with TMJ-OA, and induce matrix metalloproteinases:MMPs. These enzymes cause breakdown of condylar cartilage, resulting in further deterioration of the lubricating and buffering function of TMJ. Recently, details of the mechanism by which an inflammatory response is induced through mechanoreceptors that receive an excessive mechanical load has been clarified.
In this presentation, the molecular mechanism of condylar resorption will be considered based on the basic research and clinical data for the past 28 years.

TMJ

Sunil Kapila

Idiopathic Condylar Resorption: Current Approaches to Diagnosis and Management

Sunil Kapila

Professional Experience and Education

1977-1981 University of Nairobi, Kenya, Bachelor of Dental Surgery
1984-1987 University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, MS & Certificate of Specialization in Orthodontics
1987-1994 University of California San Francisco, Ph.D. in Oral Biology
1993-1999 Assistant Professor, Department of Growth and Development, UCSF
1999-2004 Associate Professor, Department of Growth and Development, UCSF
2000-2004 Eugene E. West Endowed Chair, Division of Orthodontics of Orthodontics, UCSF
2004-2016 Robert W. Browne Endowed Professor of Orthodontics and Chair, Department of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry, University of Michigan
2016-Present Professor and Eugene. E. West Endowed Chair of Orthodontics, UCSF
2017-2019 CEO and Chief Dental Officer, UCSF Dental Center, UCSF School of Dentistry

Honors and Awards

1984-1987 Fulbright Hayes Scholarship
1987-1992 Dean's Fellowship, School of Dentistry, UCSF
1989-1990 Regents Fellowship, UCSF
1993 Hatton Award Winner, American Association for Dental Research
1995 Milo Hellman Research Award, AAO
1999 B.F. Dewel Honorary Research Award, AAO Foundation
2007 Outstanding Alumnus Award, Department of Orthodontics University of Oklahoma College of Dentistry
2012 16th Annual Robert E. Moyers Memorial Lecture, Ann Arbor, MI.
2013 Salzmann Lecture, Annual Session of the AAO, Philadelphia, Penn
2013 Fellow of the International College of Dentists
2015 150th Anniversary Alumni Excellence Award Recipient, UCSF
2018-2019 Burstone Fellow in Biomechanics, AAO Foundation

Research Interests

Hormonal Pathobiology of TMJ Degeneration
Biomodulation of Tooth Movement and Root Resorption in Orthodontic Therapy
Cone Beam Computed Tomography and 3D Imaging

Abstract

The pre-treatment or in-treatment identification of patients undergoing idiopathic condylar resorption of the TMJ and their management remains one of the biggest challenges in orthodontics. Frequently, because these joint resorptive events and associated adverse dental and skeletal alterations occur during orthodontic treatment, the concomitant compromised function and facial changes are often attributed to the orthodontic therapy itself. Much is still unknown about these perplexing conditions. In his presentation, Dr. Kapila will discuss the current understanding of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of idiopathic condylar resorption, including that which may occur during juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Early recognition through careful history taking and clinical examination together with newer diagnostic methods using 3D imaging and biomarkers and constant monitoring can help mitigate some of the challenges arising during orthodontic treatment. Alternatively, these findings can be used to defer treatment of these patients until stabilization occurs. Specific radiographic and other features that indicate cessation of the disease process are a prerequisite for initiating orthodontic therapy. Dr. Kapila will also discuss a range for patient-specific treatment options for individuals presenting with different phenotypic and degenerative TMJ findings in idiopathic condylar resorption ranging from conservative management to orthognathic surgery.

Craniofacial Growth

Ichiro Takahashi

Mechanical stress response of chondrocytes during early development of cartilage

Ichiro Takahashi

Professional Experience and Education

2009-present Professor and Chair, Section of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
Kyushu University Faculty of Dental Science
2011-2019 Vice-dean, Kyushu University Faculty of Dental Science,
2007-2009 Associate Professor, Division of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Graduate School of Dentistry, Tohoku University
2003-2007 Assistant Professor, Division of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Graduate School of Dentistry, Tohoku University
1998-2003 Research Associate, Division of Orthodontics, Graduate School of Dentistry, Tohoku University
1996-1998 Visiting Research Fellow, Craniofacial Development Section, NIAMS/NIH
1992-1996 Research Associate, Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Tohoku University
1988-1992 PhD, Graduate School of Dentistry, Tohoku University
1982-1988 DDS, School of Dentistry, Tohoku University

Research Interests

  • Temporomandibular joint morphogenesis
  • Mechanical stress responses of cartilages and chondrocytes
  • Tooth movement and periodontal ligament
  • Craniofacial developmental biology
  • Biomaterials in bone tissue
  • Education in Orthodontics.

Abstract

Scientific background of orthodontic-orthopedic treatment for skeletal malocclusion during growing period is one of the important issues to be addressed. Mandibular condylar cartilage (MCC) is the major growing cite of mandible by endochondral bone formation. We have been performing series of experiments to analyze the cellular response of differentiating chondrocyte to compressive and tensional stress loading. In the first experiment, electrical stimulation of lateral pterygoid muscle inhibited the chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal cells in the posterior area of MCC in growing rats. Since distribution of mechanicals stress in temporomandibular joints was unclear, we employed midpalatal suture cartilage (MSC) in growing rats to verify the hypothesis that compression enhances chondrogenesis and tension inhibits chondrogenic differentiation in the MSC. As the result, hypertrophy of chondrocytes was enhanced in the MSC compressed by orthopedic force, while the cartilage was replaced by bone under expansive force. Further, integrins are found to be expressed in the MSC and Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK) was activated by expansive force. To analyze the cellular mechanisms of mechano-response of differentiating chondrocytes, embryonic limb bud cells were mechanically stimulated in vitro. When mouse limb bud cells were compressed in collagen gel 3-D culture, differentiation of chondrocytes was accelerated with enhanced expression of Sox9, the transcriptional activator for cartilage specific collagen, Col2a1. On the other hand, expansive stress inhibited the chondrogenic differentiation of rat limb bud cells in stretched micromass culture through integrin mediated ERK signaling pathway. Thus, different types of mechanical stress would differentially regulate the differentiation of chondrocytes.

Craniofacial Growth

Laura R Iwasaki

Mechanobehavior to predict temporomandibular joint growth and degeneration

Laura R Iwasaki

Professional Experience and Education

2018-Present Chair and Professor (Provisional), Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU), USA
2007-2018 Leo A. Rogers Chair and Associate Professor, Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics; Associate Professor, Oral and Craniofacial Sciences (joint appointment); School of Dentistry; Graduate Faculty, School of Graduate Studies; University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC), USA
2006-Present Research Assistant Professor (2006-2019), Research Associate Professor (2019-Present), Oral Diagnostic Sciences (volunteer appointment), School of Dental Medicine, University at Buffalo, USA
1996-2006 Assistant Professor, Growth & Development, College of Dentistry, University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC), USA
1999-2006 Graduate Faculty, Graduate College, University of Nebraska, USA
1992-1996 Assistant Professor, Preventive Dental Science, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Manitoba, Canada
1992 PhD (Interdisciplinary Studies), Faculty of Graduate Studies, University of Manitoba, Canada
1987 MSc (Preventive Dental Science) and Orthodontic Certification, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Manitoba, Canada
1983-1984 Residency (General Dentistry), Vancouver General Hospital/University of British Columbia, Canada
1983 DDS, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Alberta, Canada
1981 BSc (Dental Sciences), Faculty of Science, University of Alberta, Canada

Honors and Awards

2019 Eugene and Pauline Blair Distinguished Service Award, American Association of Orthodontists Foundation (AAOF)
2018 GAC International Corporate Center Award, AAOF
2007 American Association of Orthodontists Orthodontic Faculty Development Award
2005 3M Unitek Corporate Center Award, AAOF
2000 BF Dewel Memorial Biomedical Research Award, AAOF

Research Interests

Biomechanics and behaviors of the human craniomandibular complex with special interests in the TMJ, jaw muscles, and tooth movement.

Abstract

Mechanical loading is important to the growth and maintenance of the secondary cartilages of the condyle and eminence of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The fibrocartilage disc between the condyle and eminence distributes loads, provides lubrication and, because it is avascular, depends on mechanical loading for nutrient exchange. Hence, therapies to modify jaw growth and prevent or ameliorate degenerative joint disease could be improved by understanding the mechanical loading conditions within the TMJ. Studies in humans where the magnitude and frequency of TMJ loading were measured to distinguish dentofacial phenotypes and predict longitudinal TMJ change will be highlighted. Key measurements of mechanical loading conditions are the concentration of work input to articulating tissues during jaw use, known as energy density, and the percentage of time that muscles are used to load the jaws out of a total recording time, known as duty factor. These measurements, combined into a mechanobehavioral score (MBS = (TMJ energy densities)2 X jaw muscle duty factors), are being applied to understand better the mechanisms involved with condylar growth and the susceptibility of the TMJ to degenerative changes. This presentation will describe how clinical treatment records and data collected via validated techniques, including numerical modeling, dynamic stereometry, and laboratory and in-field electromyography are employed to determine mechanobehavioral score. Future clinical approaches that could modify mechanobehavior to achieve more successful and predictable orthopedic therapies in children with jaw discrepancies and measures to prevent degenerative changes in the TMJ will be discussed.

Craniofacial Growth

Dror Aizenbud

The management of craniofacial anomalies - 30 years' experience of the orthodontic perspective

Dror Aizenbud

Prof. Dror Aizenbud is a full professor of orthodontics and the chairman of the Department of Orthodontics and Craniofacial Anomalies and the deputy director of the School of Graduate Dentistry, Rambam Health Care Campus and Technion Israel Institute of Technology – Faculty of Medicine Haifa, Israel. He is the past president of the IADR Israeli Division. He honored a visiting professor nomination at the Craniofacial Anomalies Center, Stanford University Hospital, California, USA. Prof Aizenbud holds a Master of Science degree, a degree in dentistry and a certificate in orthodontics, both from the Hebrew University and Hadassah School of Dental Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel. He spent a fellowship program in the Craniofacial Center at the University of Illinois at Chicago with the group of Drs. Figueroa and Polley.
Prof. Aizenbud's Oral Biology Research Lab in the Faculty of Medicine, Technion is focused on craniofacial anomalies, biology of tooth movement and accelerated tooth movement, craniofacial distraction osteogenesis, dentofacial orthopedics, Obstructive Sleep Apnea and adult interdisciplinary treatment. His main clinical interest is the combined orthodontic-surgical treatment of dental and skeletal malocclusions and anomalies.

Abstract

Congenital craniofacial anomalies can range from small isolated areas to extensive areas of bone loss involving the entire jawbone and teeth. The resulted malocclusion caused by severe skeletal and dental discrepancies pose a significant challenge for the orthodontist and other health care providers. Nowadays advanced three dimensional technologies of planning and performance of orthodontics, dentofacial orthopedics, distraction osteogenesis and orthognathic surgery type of managements has become a routine care for the growing child to deliver successful treatment results. Patients with these conditions often presented with functional and esthetic issues call for coordinated surgical, dental and medical multidisciplinary approach. Currently practice standards of patients with congenital craniofacial defects are achieved in a team setting and usually span the first two decades of life using the major advantage of patient's growth potential.
The aim of this presentation is to share our experience at the Rambam Craniofacial Orthodontic Department as the sub-specialty of orthodontics that focuses on managing patients birth defects and dental anomalies using multidisciplinary approach. These conditions often require coordinated surgical and restorative management protocol for practical and effective orthodontic treatment good aesthetics, functioning and occlusal relationships.

Bone Biology

Carlalberta Verna

The Influence of Bone Density on Tooth Movement Biomechanics

Carlalberta Verna

Professional experience and education

1989 DDS, Faculty of Medicine , School of Dentistry, University of Ferrara, Italy
1993-1996 PhD in preventive orthodontics, department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Florence, Italy
1996-1999 PhD in Odontology, Section of Orthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Aarhus, Denmark
1999-2002 Post-graduate degree in Orthodontics, Section of Orthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Aarhus, Denmark
2002-2012 Associate Professor, Section of Orthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Aarhus, Denmark
January 2013 - Professor and Head Clinic for Pediatric Oral Health and Orthodontics, University Center for Dental Medicine, UZB, University of Basel, Switzerland

Honors and Awards

Alice L. Jee Memorial Award for junior investigators. International Sun Valley Workshop on Hard Tissues, Sun Valley, Idaho, USA, 1998
W.H.B. Houston research award European Orthodontic Society, 1999
W.J.B. Houston scholarship from the European Orthodontic Society 2000-2003 Beni Solow award European Journal of Orthodontics 2004
Italian Orthodontic Society for the best scientific paper in 2006
Houston award for the best poster presentation European Orthodontic Society, 2006
Beni Solow award European Journal of Orthodontics 2009

Research interests

Biology of tooth movement, biomechanics, craniofacial anomalies

Abstract

The achievement of a planned tooth movement is the result of the interaction between variables related to the orthodontist and variables related to the patient. The orthodontist plans the individual biomechanical system in relation to the centre of resistance of one tooth or groups of teeth. It is known that the location of the centre of resistance varies according to the patients' anatomical characteristics; the anatomy of the supporting tissues and the shape of the roots. The quality of the supporting tissues in terms of bone density has seldomly been taken into consideration as potential variable that could influence the location of the centre of resistance. Surgically facilitated orthodontic tooth movement is one of the various attempts of orthodontists to influence patients' response to enhance tooth movement rate. The principle is based on the local acceleration of bone remodelling activities occurring in bone repair processes, where bone density is initially decreased. Accelerated bone turnover in animal models has shown to increase tooth movement rate and the application of a single force induces a controlled rather than an uncontrolled tipping, as would under normal bone turnover conditions. A Finite Element analysis of tooth movement after corticotomy revealed that translation in corticotomized teeth occurs at a larger M/F ratio compared to normal bone turnover. In order to achieve this, a bigger moment needs to be inserted into the wire.

Bone Biology

Hiroshi Kamioka

Bioimaging of Bone

Hiroshi Kamioka

Professional Experience and Education

2015-present Director in Okayama University Hospital Advanced Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate Treatment Center.
2014-present Professor and Chair in Dept. of Orthodontics, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University.
2005-2014 Associate Professor in Dept. of Orthodontics, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University.
1999-2005 Lecturer in Dept. of Orthodontics, Okayama University Hospital
1995-1998 Post-doctoral fellow in Dept. of Anatomy, Indiana University Medical School, USA
1993-1999 Assistant Professor in Dept. of Orthodontics, Tokushima University Dental School

Honors and Awards

2009 Microscopy and Microanalysis best biological paper award for 2008, Microscopy Society of America
2003 Best poster award in 21st Japan Bone and Mineral Metabolism Meeting
2000 Excellent presentation award in 59th Japan Orthodontic Meeting

Research Interests

Biological analysis of tooth movement

Abstract

In a variety of scientific fields, it is a worthwhile topic to visualize natural phenomenon. Newly developed visualizing method often leads breakthrough in the scientific fields. Especially, in the biological field, it is significant to reveal temporal-spatial response happened in the cells with visualizing molecular level phenomenon. Such visualization could provide information to understand cellular behavior to their extracellular stimulus in vivo and in vitro. Although osteocytes are the most abundant cells in bone, it has been difficult to study their biological feature because they are embedded in hard bone tissue. So, even the real 3D structure of the osteocyte was not uncovered till lately. As it is already known orthodontic tooth movement requires dramatic bone changes. Osteocytes are thought to be primary mechanosensory cells. In this presentation, we will introduce our application of confocal laser scanning microscopy, ultra-high voltage electron microscopy and focused ion beam scanning electric microscopy to reveal the bone microstructure and discuss the mechanosensitivity of the cells in bone.

Bone Biology

Sarandeep Huja

Need for Speed, An orthodontic imperative?

Sarandeep Huja

Dr. Sarandeep S. Huja, DDS, PhD currently serves as the Dean, of the James B. Edwards College of Dental Medicine and Professor, Department of Orthodontics Medical University of South Carolina

Dr. Huja initially received his dental (1987) and orthodontic (1992) training from the Government Dental College and Hospital, Bombay. From 1993-2001, he was associated with three US institutions, receiving his MS (1995) from Marquette University, Milwaukee, his PhD (1999) and Orthodontic Certificate (1999) from Indiana University, Indianapolis and his DDS (2001) from University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Dentistry, Lincoln. His PhD was conducted under the mentorship of Dr. David Burr from the Department of Anatomy and Dr. W. Eugene Roberts in Orthodontics from Indiana University. From 2001-2011, he was a faculty at the Ohio State University working under the mentorship of Dr. Katherine Vig, a world renowned orthodontist and educator. In 2011 he moved the University of Kentucky as Division Chief of Orthodontics. In 2016 he was appointed the Program Director of Orthodontics and Associate Dean for Faculty and Student Development and Graduate Studies at the University of Kentucky.
He has served as advisor for both PhD and Masters graduate students and has taught Orthodontics and Bone Biology to dental and graduate students. He has the Principle Investigator on grants from the NIDCR, NIH, Corporate and Foundations. His research seeks to understand bone remodeling, osteoclast biology and adaptation to physical forces. His students have been recognized with national awards on projects related to tooth movement and implant adaptation biology. Dr. Huja is also the recipient of the prestigious B.F. Dewel Memorial Biomedical Research Award, from the American Association of Orthodontists Foundation.
Dr. Huja is a member of the Midwest component of the E.H. Angle Society and is a Diplomate of the American Board of Orthodontics, and he also maintains an intramural faculty practice.
He is widely published in the field of Bone Biology and Orthodontics and is a frequent speaker at national and international meetings. He serves as the Vice Chair of the Planning and Award Review Committee of the American Association of Orthodontist Foundation and has previously served as an orthodontic site visitor for Commission on Dental Accreditation. He is an Alumnus of the ADEA Leadership Institute serving as the inaugural ADEA/ADEAGies Foundation Drs. Connie L. and Richard R. Drisko Scholar. He also served as the President of the Craniofacial Biology Group of the International Association of Dental Research.

Abstract

Many methods to expedite orthodontic tooth movement have been developed with little promise for current practice. However, the research has led to an affirmation that the benefits of reduction in treatment time is a worthy goal. We will describe and compare animal models to study tooth movement with the focus on tissue level bone biology and relate this fundamental information to tooth movement in humans and clinical practice. Forces for orthodontic tooth movement remain undefined. We will expand on the need to understand the force and engineering stress to produce optimal tooth movements and thus expediting/optimizing tooth movement. In the future, orthodontic tooth movement are likely to be individualize in a patient based on tooth root surface area, anchorage segments, desirable versus undesirable tooth movements, besides gender/age thereby producing direct path and personalized tooth movements for each patient. The participant will thus be exposed to most recent concepts and evidence based methods to achieving orthodontic tooth movements.

Allied Health Professional Program: Technicians

Advancement Digital Technology

Technicians: Advancement Digital Technology

Masahiro Iijima

3D digital models generated by intraoral scanning - Is it reliable for clinical use?

Masahiro Iijima

Professional Experience and Education

2018-Present Professor and Chair, Division of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, Japan
2005-2018 Associate Professor, Division of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, Japan
2002-2005 Assistant Professor, Division of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, Japan
2000-2002 Visiting Scholar, Ohio State University
1998-2000 Instructor, Division of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, Japan
1998 PhD, Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, Japan
1993 DDS, Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, Japan

Award

2013 Best Paper Award, Japanese Society of Dental Materials and Devices
2015 Academic Award, Japanese Society of Dental Materials and Devices

Research Interests

Biomaterials

Abstract

The use of digital technology in orthodontics has been increasing in the last few decades. In particular, digital 3D model generated by intraoral scanning has been widely accepted by the field of clinical orthodontics, and is advantageous due to the compact storage space, simplified method of transferring data, potential to expand application for treatment planning, and fabrication of customized appliances. Most studies reported that intraoral scanners are highly accurate, however, the accuracy is possibly decreased as the range of the scan and the morphology. Therefore, full-arch scan with undercut areas caused by crowded teeth may influence the accuracy. The establishment of a reliable reference is also important to investigating the accuracy of digital models. For fabrication customized fixed appliances and indirect bonding trays, the digital setup models should have reliable accuracy. This presentation will review the accuracy of full-arch digital models by intraoral scanning. In addition, setup accuracy in digital models and the clinical applications will be also discussed.

Technicians: Advancement Digital Technology

Makoto Tashiro

Evolution of orthodontic treatment with optical impression and 3D technology

Makoto Tashiro

Professional Experience and Education

2020 Assistant Professor, Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Japan
2019 PhD, Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Japan

Research Interests

Optical impression
3D Technology in Orthodontics

Abstract

In recent years, digital technologies have been applied in orthodontic clinic. There are many types of intraoral scanners on the market. The performance of the intraoral scanner has been improved, and it has become possible to obtain highly accurate three-dimensional intraoral data by an optical impression. With this situation, treatment using clear aligners has also become widespread. Clear aligners orthodontic treatment has many advantages over conventional fixed appliance treatment, including aesthetic aspects, and it is clear that it will become more widely used in the future. There are also many types of simulation software for designing clear aligners. This presentation will provide the principles, accuracy and scanning time, and the workflow using some simulation software. In addition, this will suggest the possibility of future orthodontic treatment using optical impression and 3D technology.

All sessions in this time slot will be released at 4 pm JST.
APOS Oration
Eric J.W. Liou

Redirecting mandibular and maxillary growth in pubertal growing patients with Class III malocclusion

Eric J.W. Liou

Dr. Eric Liou is an associate professor and the immediate past chairman of the Faculty of Dentistry, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital & Chang Gung University, Taipei, Taiwan. He is also a visiting professor in the Department of Orthodontics, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan. For the profession affiliations, Dr. Liou was the president of the Taiwan association of Orthodontists 2015-2016, and is the immediate past president of the World Implant Orthodontic Association (WIOA). Currently, he is the Vice President of the Asian Pacific Orthodontic Society (APOS) and an editor of the APOS Trends in Orthodontics, and Secretary General of the WIOA. His main research interests are distraction osteogenesis, TADs, orthodontic tooth movement, platelet rich plasma (PRP) and bone physiology, and surgical and non-surgical innovative approaches. Dr. Liou has numerous presentations especially on the topics of Class III orthognathic camouflage treatment, treatment of occlusal cant and facial asymmetry with yin-yang arch wires, accelerated orthodontic tooth movement with PRP, maxillary orthopedic protraction, surgery first orthognathic approach, and TADs.

Abstract

Mandibular prognathism and/or maxillary hypoplasia are the two most common features in pubertal patients with Class III malocclusion. Maxillary hypoplasia includes sagittal and/or vertical deficiency. The orthodontic camouflage treatment or orthopedic maxillary protraction in growing Class III patients usually focuses on the sagittal improvement of anterior cross bite and maxillary growth, but seldom on the maxillary vertical deficiency and control of mandibular growth. Furthermore, the subsequent relapse & cease of maxillary sutural growth after maxillary protraction, and outgrowth of mandible during puberty are substantially unsolved problems. Although we are not able to reduce the growth amount of mandible, the purpose of this presentation is to propose innovative thoughts and clinically feasible techniques for redirecting mandibular growth inferiorly and even posteriorly, and at the same time redirecting maxillary growth anteriorly and inferiorly by surface remodeling of maxilla (periosteal growth of maxilla). The rationales, clinical studies, and cases illustrations will be presented.